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Crashchris

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About Crashchris

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  1. "if I stopped" good point, need new break pads.... haha. My old car actually did have a crank..... Never used it but it was in the boot.. i think CCC's car might have one lol. Agree re. the whinging and mental health BS. Too much time on their hands? Stop analysing life through the facebook echo chamber and get on with living it! Toughen up flower.
  2. Community v consumerism. Everyone is trying so hard to pretend to live a life they believe they should that they miss out on actually living. I must be getting old lol. I even got told I should buy a new car as mine had to have a bit of welding to the exhaust. This was form someone who can't afford a car but their friend has a new Audi A3 and it's "amazing". I said there's no way he owns it. He's renting it from the banks. This was checked and yes it was leased, costing around £4k per year for 3 years and then hand back (plus deposit I guess)! I then explained that I've probably saved about £30k over the last 7 years that I've had my current car compared to him and I still get from A to B in a tidy comfortable and fun car to drive (Golf V5). He was shocked and "had never thought to look at it that way".... OMFG!
  3. My car 14 years old, you beat me I love going away though and would do without many things before I gave that up. I love the experience and time with friends whether abroad or in this country. Have had fantastic holidays in Scotland in a big house with friends, hiking by day and drinking wine by night . It costs very little with 6 or 8 people sharing the drive and the accomodation
  4. hahaha bangers and splash My friend just bought a 2 year old 3 bed house for £130k in Louth (LN11), about £5k less than when it was sold new. Lounge is tiny and looks onto the car park, garden overlooked by literally everyone on the estate with 4ft high cheap fences and a mud bath next door with 2 huge dogs trampling in their own excrement! What a bargain!! The kitchen is a fair size as is the master bedroom but the other 2 bedrooms should really be one! I am sure the developer squeezed a dozen more houses onto the plot than they should have, it could have been a decent area but as it is, it looks cheap and nasty and cramped. Also built in the flood plain DB! In fact the last house they bought was also on a swampy area and the house moved so much the builders had to com back in and re-level the upstairs floors!! I'd have asked for underpinning too! Shocking quality, plumbing and electrics were the same, leak after leak. Not for me! Although to be fair, in his case it was cheaper than an old Victorian 2 bed terrace....
  5. Lot's of different views and it depends whether or not you can afford to buy in the area you want to live. I wouldn't expect the government to be picking up the tab in the future. I am a similar age and could buy mortgage free and will if I find the right place in the right area. Until then I am going to buy a bolt hole in France or Spain. Something cheap and small and low maintenance close to friends who have done the same. For £70k you can get something quite decent in the Loire valley, even less for a wreck and do the work yourself. It's a lovely area and I have friends there and it's an easy drive / short flight / train. My only advise is son't buy something because it is cheap. The location and proximity to friends for me is the number one priority. An ugly run down house can be altered but the location and surrounds cannot. Regarding Thailand. A lot can change in the next 10 years so I personally wouldn't want to wait, hoping for everything to stay the same. I am sure this country will also be very different in 10 years and maybe the value of the pound will be worthless abroad by then (maybe not!). A lot of things to consider. More than just the price of a house. If you can buy in an area you'll be happy with a small mortgage that you can pay off (it sounds like you can) then it may not be a bad choice. I personally cant do that in London so it is not an option for me. You could also rent a room out to cover the running costs of your house.
  6. I see the funny side but it's also sad. I do blame the breakdown of community and in my opinion it has been engineered that way. A society that doesn't work together is one that is easily controlled and brainwashed. I look at my nephews and can see one that would definitely fit in the with stats above; and the other that has lower expectations of life and is more of a local, happy where he is type of guy. One is part of a real community and takes responsibility for his actions, one is part of an online community and can't cope with the real world. I'd go further and say he can't cope with hard work, graft and disappointment (I have no patience for it). My take on the root cause of my nephew's problem is a complete lack of resilience, everything has to be someone else's fault. It all started in school and never got better. Everyone is different of course but I have 2 real life examples that fit both with the original post and the jokey response by Chronyx :p. Winkie nails the problem and it is also what I miss since my original support network has essentially died off or become spread world wide. I don't know what the answer is but surviving in a shoe box miles away from friends and family and living on your shiny iphone trying to convince the outside world that you are happy and living the dream is not the way to happiness.
  7. Absolutely and even a tiny house up north will save you a fortune in rent. How can people afford to rent when they are retired? My parents couldn't so are happy to still be paying a small mortgage on their little house, they even said over it Easter that they don't know what they'd have done if my dad hadn't been made redundant from the farm and they'd been forced to find their own place in their 40s. What is going to happen in 20 or 30 years when all of these renters want to retire?
  8. I did thanks. I am addicted to this thread and read it every day I wish I could contribute more than I do. I am self employed now so my company can pay into a SIPP but I have enough in it now and I think I'd rather pay the tax going forwards and have an ISA despite the tax implications. Personal circumstances and fear of what will happen before I retire mean that I want the ability to invest in assets TPTB cannot take from me or take it all out to live self sufficiently!
  9. +1 It's not their fault. It is the fault of their parents and the government for encouraging people to have unwanted kids for a living just so they keep their fictitious GDP growth propped up with more consumption and imported housing demand, all paid for by QE and tax payers. What hope have they got with no role models, no discipline and a society that thinks everything is up for grabs and with no consequence. It's very sad. I have personal experience of this in the family and you simply cannot blame the kids.
  10. I've decided to rent for another year or two having sold my place last year. I was kicked out of my last place on a whim and I was almost tempted to buy in the SE to feel settled again but screw it, I'll just leave the South (or UK) in 2 years if things stay the same. Life is too short to saddle yourself with that amount of debt, depending on income etc. I've got a lovely flat in a great area at a good price. The landlord seems great and really interested in keeping it in a condition they would be happy to live in. Interview the landlord and don't take it if you have doubts. Good landlords do exist it seems, they are just hard to find.
  11. Good advice, thanks. I think I'd feel more comfortable with more control given where we are and what might happen. ISA it is.
  12. I've been thinking about this (The end of the next cycle) and whether or not I should put any more into my pension on the basis that I will be able to draw down in 10 years time, just about the time the whole thing may go pop! If it isn't in a SIPP then I can at least use the cash to invest in something I can live in / grow food on (wherever that may be) prior to the big event.... If it's in a SIPP I might lose the lot and not be able to do anything about it or have a portion of it stolen by TPTB! The tax benefits of a pension don't mean much if there's a chance of losing it. Anyone have any thoughts on this?
  13. +1 First time for everything. Lesser of the 2 only evils worth voting for!
  14. and then there's other facts without the log scale ( I know nothing about bitcoin, just couldn't quite work out the chart scale)
  15. Great Idea, I've read this thread from start to finish at least 3 times!! It's full of fantastic information and great links for those just starting to get their head around it all. Thanks DB and all. It's my daily dose of reality
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