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Futuroid

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Everything posted by Futuroid

  1. The article states.. "Unilever was shaken by a $143bn takeover bid last year from Kraft Heinz of the US. It fought off the approach but since then, Paul Polman, Unilever’s chief executive and a critic of Brexit, has lobbied the UK government for “a level playing field” in takeover rules. Mrs May hinted at a more interventionist approach with a pledge in the Conservative party manifesto to prevent takeovers motivated by “aggressive asset-stripping or tax avoidance”. But then... "However, within days of becoming prime minister in 2016, the £24bn takeover of UK technology company Arm Holdings by Japan’s SoftBank was waved through as “a vote of confidence in Britain”." After which she did sweet F.A. That Conservative manifesto sure was fake news and of course, good to know Mrs May helped this one along personally! The exit of the UK's third biggest company by value - happy, happy days!
  2. He would. Did his model predict a central bank intervention a few weeks after the vote and a slow decline of UK growth? Do you have a link to his 2018 economic forecasts? Who do I believe... The further you get from the present, the harder it is to make accurate predictions about the future. I'd go with the OBR for the next year, then all bets are off because the deal / no deal and subsequent fallout could influence the economy quite drastically.
  3. It tells the story of someone who doesn't know what they are talking about. Only someone drunk, mad or with only a history book that extends 10 years into the past would suggest that Afghanistan and Iraq are "are as stable as theyve ever been."
  4. "Since the war there’s never been 5 consecutive years of GDP growth of 1.5% or below, as forecast today by OBR" - Faisal Islam Well, if Brexit was about nostalgia sound like we are right on track. That's some impressive growth "This means that despite almost no-one feeling like Britain's economy is going gangbusters, the @OBR_UK thinks we are actually outperforming what we can sustainably produce - that's the real pessimism underlying today's grim forecasts " - Torsten Bell, Resolution Foundation Yes, it's looking pretty rosy. The only question now is how to spend that Brexit dividend. I know, how about on your essential bills when you get made redundant? "OBR: Fairly high chance of a recession before 2023" Oh, and just to sign off on a positive note... "Not that much to be Tiggerish about here. Growth forecasts dreadful compared with what we thought in March 2016, dreadful by historical standards and dreadful compared with most of the rest of the world." - Paul Johnson, Directory IFS. Pat yourself on the backs Brexiters - cos nobody else will...
  5. Wait... weren't forecasts unreliable last week (you know, the ones that said every Brexit option would leave us poorer)? Now they are reliable again! Hooray! War is peace, freedom is slavery, Brexit is doubleplus good!
  6. Go home, you're drunk. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_countries_by_Fragile_States_Index
  7. Couldn't have said it better. All remain need to do to win, is: 1. Wait 5 years. 2. Change name from Remain to "Rejoin" . Even IF (and it's a massive if) the people in positions of power in the UK were interested in making the changes that need to be made to ensure a more balanced and equitable economy, they simply won't have the time because they'll spend the next decade on wheel reinvention and firefighting.
  8. https://uk.reuters.com/article/uk-britain-economy/uk-consumer-spending-suffers-weakest-start-since-2012-visa-idUKKCN1GO018 "British consumers tightened their belts in February, giving the weakest start to the year since 2012, figures from payments company Visa showed on Monday, raising the prospects that the broader economy will slow in the first quarter of 2018." Not the time to be selling non-essentials in the UK.
  9. Reading this thread is like watching kids when they're told Santa doesn't exist. Is there any one of you who seriously thought May and the Conservatives were serious about building 300,000 new homes. To put that number into context, the only time in recorded UK history the country was building 300,000 homes was IIRC sometime in the 1970s and 40% of the homes being built were council houses.
  10. Yes, of course that won't be applicable or even practical in all cases. But when your work is outsourced to India, you have far fewer options. And the Indians or Chinese can undercut you because they use copied / pirated machinery, software / have no H&S, etc. Not to mention India / China, etc. aren't paying into the EU for things like structural funds. Rather interestingly, all Patrick Miniford's analysis showing Britain benefitting from Brexit rely on pretty much writing a large chunk of the manufacturing sector as a lost cause ('cos we'll never cut costs far enough to compete in a zero tariff world) and lowering standards on product safety, etc.so we can compete in other areas. A level playing field - of the lower common denominator.
  11. I know plenty of people who rent council houses and own dogs, so I don't think there is a direct correlation between dog ownership and home ownership. I do wonder how on earth some people on low incomes support dogs having seen the vet's bills my best friend ended up with for his - £800 in the first 6 months!
  12. It's good there are a lot charity shops on most UK high streets - I think people are going to be needing them in the next few years
  13. Of course. Any astute observer of UK government interaction with/intervention in the housing market would surely agree that governments of both colours prioritise the housing market over pretty much all else in the UK. Especially since the demographic who voted for Brexit overlaps neatly with the generation who benefited most from HPI (and also hold the most electoral power...)
  14. Are you entirely familiar with the Single Market concept? It guarantees the free movement of not only goods but also capital, services and labour. What this means is that when the inevitable external competition means your employer relocates or closes your workplace, at least you can move with it. It also means the rules on state aid, employee rights, safety, etc are level within the Single Market. Contrast this with the global market, where a populous country like India or China can massively undercut UK workers with not only lower wages, but also lower safety standards, no observation of IP, lower employee rights, etc. Far from undermining UK workers, the Single Market actually underpins them to some degree. If you do end up losing your job, at least you have the chance to follow it. P.S. The distance from China to the UK is very slightly longer than the distance from Hungary to the UK.
  15. Global Britain or Little Britain? UK could suffer a 'loss of trade' with around 40 countries on Brexit day, admits Liam Fox’s chief civil servant http://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/politics/uk-trade-deals-brexit-liam-fox-international-agreement-leave-eu-march-crawford-falconer-a8244716.html Countries with existing deals negotiated by EU will be 'trying to get something else extra', Trade Secretary's adviser acknowledges It's not personal. Just business.
  16. John Lewis and Waitrose owner reports 77% profit plunge https://news.sky.com/story/john-lewis-and-waitrose-owner-reports-77-profit-plunge-11280757 Earnings were hit by a squeeze on profit margins at Waitrose thanks to the Brexit-linked weakness of the pound - which pushed up costs at the same time as the supermarket was trying to keep a lid on prices. Ouch!
  17. You could be right - I seem to remember that it depends on the sectors/areas the trade deal covers - the EU is able to sign off on some, but not all. QMV doesn't get the UK off the hook though - they still need something that appeals to a qualified majority of countries.
  18. HMS Cake 2.0 has exploded on the launch pad. http://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/politics/brexit-theresa-may-trade-plan-rejected-eu-donald-tusk-uk-relations-latest-updates-a8243721.html Oh well, May's speech was always about smoothing things over within the Conservative party, nobody in Europe, or the world outside of the Tories, thought it had any legs.
  19. Did each country parliament need to pass the recent deal with Canada (CETA)? Yes, they did - https://www.theguardian.com/world/2016/oct/24/eu-trade-deal-with-canada-collapses-as-belgium-refuses-to-sign Once the UK leaves the EU, it becomes a "third country" just like any other.
  20. He took out a jumbo mortgage and maxxed out his credit cards to snap up a nice two bed new build flat for half a million. He's thinking of expanding his "portfolio" and now he talks about mad gainz with strangers at bus stops. It's like the bit at the end of One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest
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