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Dr Doom

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About Dr Doom

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  1. So it was a private bank during WW2? Who owned it then I wonder?
  2. Britannica Building Society, now part of the co-op has one: PROPRIETOR: ILLIUS PROPERTIES LIMITED (Co. Regn. No. 6475331) of Britannia House, 2nd Floor, 10 Town Road, Hanley ST1 2QQ When I downloaded their report a few years ago it showed they had about £100m worth of property.
  3. The case I looked at a couple of years ago, I downloaded the deeds, which showed the property had been transacted at an artificially inflated value between the shell and the individual being repossessed, artificially inflated I assume so the bank doesn't have to mark it to market and realise a bad debt on their balance sheet. Very enron-esque, not sure how they manage to account for the shell without breaking accounting rules, as obviously they have to lend money to the shell so that it can buy it off the repossessee for above-market value. Would be very interesting to talk to somebody who's been offered this sort of deal by a bank.
  4. I started a thread about this 2 years ago. Banks Buying Back Distressed Properties Through Shell Companies http://www.housepricecrash.co.uk/forum/index.php?showtopic=122299&st=0 Yes it's a disgrace.
  5. Dr Doom

    Silver

    Yes, not that strange really. A lot of precious metals gurus, i.e. Mike Maloney, Gold Money, etc etc have businesses which enable people to take ownership of precious metals. It's usually the case that someone who knows the most about something is likely to be in that business. I'd be more suspicious of an entity which acts as the custodian for silver ETFs, while simultaneously holding massive concentrated paper short positions. Silver ETFs are essentially a kind of naked short position as well; with some small print to say they can settle in paper if they happen not to have any physical silver. Great.
  6. Dr Doom

    Silver

  7. Dr Doom

    Silver

    I'm pretty sure there's data somewhere on JP Morgan's & HSBC's massive concentrated short position, it came out in CFTC hearings that these two entities were short something like over half the outstanding paper contracts. Or ~10 years mine supply. Why don't they buy lots of it? Because they don't want the price to go up. They have unlimited finances, and can make the paper market go up and down at will probably, but probably time movements to stop out as many longs as possible, demoralising those trading the paper silver markets. What they don't really control however is the physical silver market, if enough people get wind that silver should rightly be at $500+/oz and buy it and hold onto it, there won't be enough silver.
  8. Dr Doom

    Silver

    Options Expiry Time ? I've no idea if this is actually the case, but if you believe in the JP Morgan Giant Short Position Conspiracy Theories, these ******* will push the price down just as before their short contracts roll-over, minimising their own losses, then I assume let the price rise again, and take on new short positions.
  9. 14.39, nice bit of nose picking, mmmm
  10. Dr Doom

    Jp Morgan Trading Desk Reaction

    There's no suppression of the gold price. $1300 is the equilibrium market value. Why would anybody want to keep the gold price low ?
  11. Dr Doom

    Jp Morgan Trading Desk Reaction

    There was some talk on the Keiser Report a few days ago about a dirty dozen of arab billionaires, intent on busting the LBMA by withdrawing massive amounts of physical gold. On a slightly random gold tangent, I was recently flying back from Asia and saw some HSBC marketing on the walkway from the plane which said something like "there is enough gold under the ocean to give 100,000 euro to everybody on the planet" alongside is a picture of a deepsea diver finding some gold in the deep sea, no further explanation. Anybody know wtf that could be about ? (especially strange considering they are one of the two banking powerhouses accused of holding these massive manipulative short positions).
  12. Dr Doom

    Things Must Be Bad

    + of course hefty fees for extending the lease which will have to be done at some point, i believe the property becomes unmortgagable if the lease slips below 70 yrs i think.
  13. Dr Doom

    Things Must Be Bad

    how do you know they've gone bust ? but yes, would agree, these would be great investments at these guide prices
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