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Tapori

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Everything posted by Tapori

  1. Very interesting points. I bet you the FSA would fail any actual ACOBA restrictions on civil service/revolving door restrictions and banks
  2. https://www.telegraph.co.uk/property/buy/property-mini-boom-will-become-mega-bust-kafkaesque-cladding/?li_source=LI&li_medium=liftigniter-rhr This property 'mini-boom' will become a 'mega-bust' if the Kafkaesque cladding crisis is not solved This will cripple the entire property market – not just hurt those with leasehold flats
  3. "Can't buy weed and pussy with contactless."
  4. Are you implying that middle-class and upper middle class comfortable kids have never always existed? Money + Comfortable ness = SJW first-world problems. Individualism and Technology has a lot to answer for.
  5. Boris Johnson has promised to create "Generation Buy" with low-deposit mortgages to help get young people onto the housing ladder. The Prime Minister said he would "fix" the problem of unaffordable deposits that has caused millions of people to put their dreams of home ownership on hold. Mr Johnson told The Telegraph ahead of the virtual Conservative Party conference that he was determined to press ahead with a "massive domestic agenda" and deliver on manifesto promises, despite the coronavirus crisis. He also insisted he remained a low-tax, libertarian Conservative who would pay for the cost of the pandemic through a "free market-led recovery" and dismissed talk of rivalry between him and Rishi Sunak, the Chancellor, as "untrue". In a wide-ranging interview, Mr Johnson also addressed criticism of his Covid restrictions by saying there was a "moral imperative" to save lives, as well as discussing the chances of a Brexit deal and revealing how he gets his baby son Wilfred to sleep. Speaking in his Downing Street office, the Prime Minister outlined his plans for a successor to Margaret Thatcher's Right to Buy policy as he explained how he would solve the problem of "Generation Rent". He said: "I think a huge, huge number of people feel totally excluded from capitalism, from the idea of home ownership, which is so vital for our society. And we're going to fix that – 'Generation Buy' is what we're going for." Boris Johnson wants to turn 'Generation Rent' into 'Generation Buy' CREDIT: Paul Grover for the Telegraph More than two million people who are comfortably able to afford mortgage repayments are locked out of the housing market because they cannot save up for deposits, which typically run to 15 or 20 per cent of a property's value. Mr Johnson has asked ministers to work up plans for encouraging long-term fixed-rate mortgages with five per cent deposits. They are likely to involve reversing regulatory changes made in the wake of the financial crash that have required banks to stress-test applicants. By removing stress tests, banks would be able to offer 95 per cent loans, as was the norm 15 years ago. It is understood that the Government could also accept some of the risk through a form of state guarantee to give lenders additional confidence. Mr Johnson said: "We need mortgages that will help people really get on the housing ladder even if they have only a very small amount to pay by way of deposit, the 95 per cent mortgages. I think it could be absolutely revolutionary, particularly for young people."
  6. Me mam literally used to take the piss, as those Twigs when bundled together, are used to sweep floors in South Asia. "How much for a wicker broom from Ikea? ****** off."
  7. I do not understand this being "trivial." If you inherit 300k vs 0 inheritance, it's literally the opposite of trivial. I do understand the context of your point that HPI screws everyone but the other poster has a really good point plus you're assuming that via HPI the children would all want to buy a similiar house in the same area. So, if a lad inherits 300k from a London sale, he can buy straight cash, the equivalent house in another city. If he wishes to buy the same house he grew up in, things are of course, geared towards the issues you cite. But I lean to the other poster's points; HPI has helped a whole rung of people benefit who would otherwise have not have done in as much of a cpacity as possble, as the disparity in wants, needs and purchasing power, allows that excess raw cash accumulated from HPI sales, to be used far more extensively than non-hpi scenarios. Take say, your council bought property in Brixton. Yes, the split inheritance of a million pound family house may not buy you the equivalent in that area, but my days, 300k vs what you could have got had HPI not occurred for the same proportion of inheritance of the house, is markedly substantial.
  8. haha I blame the lobbyists advisors. Could you analyse the economic treasury teams, BoE teams, consultants that led to the BoE independence policy and idiots like Danny ******ing Blanchflower Should have listened to Ann Pettifor but she was cast aside.
  9. Oh it's even worse. Didn't "Liberalisation," lead to the absurd situation that hard earned pension funds for companies and later privatized state assets, were put in the hands of pension fund gamblers managers who then realized through an Accountant that had spotted that you could either borrow or by up the shares on the free-market of a company. These funds then bought their own companies shares and deprived future workers of investment by asset-stripping the company itself under the guise of maximising shareholder profit which benefitted many pension funds but screwed over the future bases
  10. https://www.telegraph.co.uk/politics/2020/10/02/exclusive-boris-johnson-vows-put-generation-buy-housing-ladder/ Boris Johnson has promised to create "Generation Buy" with low-deposit mortgages to help get young people onto the housing ladder. The Prime Minister said he would "fix" the problem of unaffordable deposits that has caused millions of people to put their dreams of home ownership on hold. Mr Johnson told The Telegraph ahead of the virtual Conservative Party conference that he was determined to press ahead with a "massive domestic agenda" and deliver on manifesto promises, despite the coronavirus crisis. He also insisted he remained a low-tax, libertarian Conservative who would pay for the cost of the pandemic through a "free market-led recovery" and dismissed talk of rivalry between him and Rishi Sunak, the Chancellor, as "untrue". In a wide-ranging interview, Mr Johnson also addressed criticism of his Covid restrictions by saying there was a "moral imperative" to save lives, as well as discussing the chances of a Brexit deal and revealing how he gets his baby son Wilfred to sleep. Speaking in his Downing Street office, the Prime Minister outlined his plans for a successor to Margaret Thatcher's Right to Buy policy as he explained how he would solve the problem of "Generation Rent". He said: "I think a huge, huge number of people feel totally excluded from capitalism, from the idea of home ownership, which is so vital for our society. And we're going to fix that – 'Generation Buy' is what we're going for." Boris Johnson wants to turn 'Generation Rent' into 'Generation Buy' CREDIT: Paul Grover for the Telegraph More than two million people who are comfortably able to afford mortgage repayments are locked out of the housing market because they cannot save up for deposits, which typically run to 15 or 20 per cent of a property's value. Mr Johnson has asked ministers to work up plans for encouraging long-term fixed-rate mortgages with five per cent deposits. They are likely to involve reversing regulatory changes made in the wake of the financial crash that have required banks to stress-test applicants. By removing stress tests, banks would be able to offer 95 per cent loans, as was the norm 15 years ago. It is understood that the Government could also accept some of the risk through a form of state guarantee to give lenders additional confidence. Mr Johnson said: "We need mortgages that will help people really get on the housing ladder even if they have only a very small amount to pay by way of deposit, the 95 per cent mortgages. I think it could be absolutely revolutionary, particularly for young people."
  11. We cannot know about a dead man's perspective. We can speculate. The main point stands. Your rejoinder doesn't erase decades of mass selling off of state assets and replenishing the coffers of bougie spivs and banks. For the record, Bevan was against the ideas of mass open door EU migration but approved of taking select refugees in certain conflicts. Even if, for arguments sake, he backed open door migration, it wouldn't erase BTL, Asset-Strippers and Scam HMO Landlords benefitting from the teat of the taxpayer en-mass: irrespective of immigration. Number of population is in line with housing stock. The issues include who owns the stock and the state of the stock of housing. "Many of those quoted were on the streets or out of prison - at least they get a warm room here." As did the people post WW2 onwards including under successive Conservative governments. Harold McMillan carried on and built tons of social homes at nowhere near the same fiscal freedoms of monetary policy today (usually today benefitting speculators and gambling banks) and with far less income generation and substantial loans (Thank you U S of A)
  12. Thank you Pat. Did the privatization benefit these same people when RM was sold on the market?
  13. Steady now. Any mass movement will be labelled by the eccentrics that normally get coverage. Shambles
  14. Without going off-track, I hope you also are aware of what happens to oil rich countries that deny America any influence...
  15. This. Unis calling the shots ******d the exams and forced the insane system for grading that was given. I mean we can move billions of pounds of football schedules for locdowns and Qatar WC but can't move exams or uni schedules? Anyone else would simply have delayed the exams and moved the semester to January Start times but oh no, the moneymen and uni spivs need their cushy money
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