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House Price Crash Forum

northern-git

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About northern-git

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  1. So far as my limited understanding of Marxism extends, according to Marx capitalism contains the seeds of its own destruction. What I think he was essentially getting at is that, as Wonderpup has already explained, the endless competition between industrialist bosses would inevitably lead to a collapse of their customer base. This, in turn, would lead to civil unrest and, eventually, revolution. The reason for the above is the need for profit. In its most essential form, profit may be defined as a situation whereby you exit an economic transaction with more resources than when you went in. In
  2. They have actually risen in some places (London) fallen slightly in most places and only fallen significantly (about 20% or so) in a very few places. In those places where they have risen, this is because there is big foreign money buying them. In those places where they have fallen significantly, this is because half the workforce worked for the local councils and are now on short hour contracts or are out of work. In other words, for ordinary people, house prices are further than ever out of reach due to them not falling, or falling but with salaries/employment prospects falling even faster.
  3. They have actually risen in some places (London) fallen slightly in most places and only fallen significantly (about 20% or so) in a very few places. In those places where they have risen, this is because there is big foreign money buying them. In those places where they have fallen significantly, this is because half the workforce worked for the local councils and are now on short hour contracts or are out of work. In other words, for ordinary people, house prices are further than ever out of reach due to them not falling, or falling but with salaries/employment prospects falling even faster.
  4. The main idea is to simply keep the boat afloat for a while longer by patching it up with more debt. Debt's the only game left in town. It's not a long game, mind you, given the lack of real primary economic growth on the horizon. But, then, the time horizon of our booms and bust are getting shorter with each sucessive cycle and so the "long view" taken by our leaders is getting comensurately shorter also.
  5. House prices, as valued in FIAT, will never be alowed to fall. Haven't the monetary manipulations by our dear leaders over the last 6 years taught you that yet? On the other hand, if you have some non FIAT asset to exchange for a house (usinf FIAT as a temporary intermediate means of exchange), only then may you see a "fall" in the exchange value of a house relative to that asset. If you are hoping for that to be the case with your FIAT, though, you can forget it. Aint gonna happen.
  6. My guess is that is has now reached critical mass in terms of prevelance in the workforce. That is to say, as long as it was only being applied to low income, low socio-economic status workers, your average BBC type wouldn't give a shit. However, such employment practices are now creeping significantly into the white collar sector and so the chattering classes are starting to get a bit twitchy. First they came for the gypsies...and I said nothing
  7. First, they came for the gypsies...and I said nothing. Then they came for me
  8. The first thing that strikes me about the rise of zero hour contracts is that everyone is going to get dragged along to this particular party whether they like it or not. In other words, any company that is able to and choose to implement a zero hours policy vis a vis their workforce, is going to competitively advantaged because they will be able to save on manpower costs during relative slack periods. This, in turn, will leave anyone who does not choose to follow a similar policy, competitively disadvantaged. Thus, all companies will be forced to implement such a policy once a critical mass o
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