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rollover

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Everything posted by rollover

  1. Lend or lose out - UK banks "Help to Buy" dilemma
  2. The cost of a National Lottery Lotto ticket has doubled to £2. The rise, the first since the lottery started in 1994, is part of a package of changes including bigger prizes, says operator Camelot. Prizes for matching three numbers will rise from £10 to £25. Average jackpots are predicted to rise to around £5m on Saturdays and £2.5m on Wednesdays. Camelot says this will mean more money for charities. It has raised £30bn for "good causes" since 1994. Total National Lottery sales have increased by 35% since 2002, when the game was officially renamed Lotto. Some 30 million tickets are reportedly bought every Saturday. BBC
  3. It's that the sweetener to hook someone up? House prices 'to rise by 25% in five years': Average home will cost nearly £280,000 while in London they will cost £566,000.
  4. Fiscal panics & selfishly erratic monetary policy…the world may still be too reliant on the Dollar to care, but that will change. https://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_detailpage&v=4mrpz2toYtU
  5. MORTGAGE borrowers who use the government’s new guarantee scheme could see interest rates fall by up to one percentage point, City A.M. understands. Banks lending under the scheme will have to pay the government a fee for each mortgage given out, a cost that will be passed on to borrowers. But the fee will only cost around one-third of the likely gain for subsidised borrowers. The scheme will give borrowers with as little as a five per cent deposit for their house a guarantee covering up to the next 15 per cent. As a result the lender should present a lower risk to the bank or building society. However the banks cannot treat the borrower in exactly the same way, as they will not have a track record of saving up for the larger deposit, and because the bank has to pay the government a fee for the guarantee – to cover the risk of paying out on a defaulting mortgage and to cover the admin costs. As a result, insiders at the lenders expect a borrower with a five per cent deposit plus 15 per cent guarantee to pay the interest rate typically faced by a borrower with a 10 per cent deposit. On a £200,000 property that could cut the rate on a two year fix from around 4.6 per cent to around 3.6 per cent. Similarly a typical borrower with a 10 per cent deposit and 10 per cent guarantee will pay the same rate as a borrower with a 15 per cent deposit.
  6. Daddy, there's a million pigeons Ready to be hooked on new religions.
  7. A super result for Angela Merkel. But, in a reference to coalition building, she said it was "too early to say exactly what we'll do". Her Christian Democrats took about 42% of the vote (39,4 % in 2009). But Mrs Merkel's preferred coalition is at risk, as her Free Democrat partners appear not have secured the 5% needed to enter parliament. She may, therefore, be forced to seek a grand coalition with the Social Democrats - estimated to have won 26% (27,9 % in 2009). There was some speculation on German television that the Christian Democrats (CDU) might even win enough seats for an absolute majority - the first in half a century - if both the FDP and AfD fail to make it into parliament.
  8. Mrs Merkel asked for votes to continue with her government's policies into 2017. Let's wait and see.
  9. Prime Minister Viktor Orbán says the government is forecasting 2 % cent growth in 2014 now the country has overcome major problems such as paying back its 2008 loan from the International Monetary Fund. Orbán, delivering his pre-agenda speech in Parliament on Monday, summed up the greatest achievements of the past months as contracting inflation, raising the wages of teachers and healthcare workers, and the decrease of unemployment. He emphasised that this progress could not have been reached without the great efforts of the Hungarian people.
  10. That was my thought as well, when I saw it.
  11. Efforts to right the ship are taking longer than expected, officials involved in the recovery of the crippled cruise liner have said.
  12. The ship has been detached from rocks.
  13. Not really! If there is someone capable to deals with the problems, they discredit him. For example: Hmrc's David Heaton a government tax adviser who was secretly filmed offering tips on how to keep money "out of the chancellor's grubby mitts" has resigned.
  14. Gold slipped on Monday, reversing early gains as growing conviction the U.S. Federal Reserve would decide to roll back its stimulus from this month dented the metal's appeal as a hedge against inflation. The consensus is that the Fed will initially reduce its bond purchases, now $85 billion a month, by $10 billion or perhaps $15 billion and will announce the taper to its quantitative easing (QE) after its September 17-18 meeting.
  15. The European Central Bank has room to manoeuvre to help offset any turbulence caused by the U.S. Federal Reserve reining in its monetary stimulus, ECB Executive Board member Peter Praet said. The bond market rout has driven yields higher across the board, including for low-risk German debt, which Praet said was a sign of "normalisation" after the record low rates of recent years. He said that recent tensions on short-term money markets were partly due to falling liquidity in the banking system as some banks repaid 3-year loans that the ECB granted during the darkest episodes of the euro zone's debt crisis. Banks were paying back the 3-year loans because they were trying to shrink down their balance sheets and reduce lending to the economy, possibly causing a de facto tightening of monetary policy. Link
  16. Is all the talk about housing bubble related to the Fed's decision?
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