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Mark Alexander

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About Mark Alexander

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  1. Nope just choosing to ignore the crap you are spouting, I have a life outside of HPC you see, I could debate each point with you from now until the end of time but I have better things to be getting on with, like keeping my tenants and my bankers happy.
  2. Yes I am still lurking Even if my mortgage lenders were to allow me to offer assured tenancies I would not do so because I have no faith in section 8. I am not alone. Until this problem is fixed I will probably do what most landlords do and continue to resort to using section 21 to gain possession when I need to do so, even in the event of default where theoretically section 8 should be the fastest route to gaining possession. I wish this wasn't necessary but sadly it is. Thankfully I have only ever had cause to evict three tenants in 26 years in of being a landlord. I have had thousands of
  3. Just popped back to say thanks for all your feedback and to let you know that we have amended a lot of our "How It All Works" based as a result of it. PS - a deed of assurance is not an insurance policy, it is a contract by way of deed. Call a spade a shovel if you like but there is a difference.
  4. Parting thoughts ..... If your landlord decides to sell up would you rather they serve you notice and sell their property with vacant possession or would you rather they look to sell the property to another landlord? When you or somebody you know next rent a property would you recommend signing a six month tenancy or try to find a landlord who offers you a Deed of Assurance? This is a very simple list of what good landlords want from their tenants:- 1) rent on time 2) respect the neighbours 3) respect the property 4) mutual respect and cooperation between landlord and tenant 5) a long
  5. Thanks for the welcome What do you mean when you say "take out a Deed of Assurance"? Do you think this is some sort of insurance policy perhaps? If so you have misunderstood. It is a legal document which states a landlords intention to allow a tenant to occupy a property for a longer period than the tenancy says (subject to the tenancy conditions being met of course) combined with a legally binding promise from landlord to tenant that is possession is sought for any reason other than breach of tenancy on the part of the tenant then the landlord will pay a pre-agreed level of compensation. I
  6. That is a very good point. I agree that the vacant period is realistically 4 months based on selling a rented property to a homeowner as opposed to selling it tenanted to another landlord. However, I think it is more likely that the period between offer and completion is closer to three months and that properties generally vacated at least one month prior to the buyer being found. I accept that it usually takes a few months to find a buyer but properties can still be advertised whilst a tenant is in situ. Whether their tenancy provides for access for viewings and whether tenants respect such
  7. So what's to stop governments from compulsory purchasing land and developing new affordable housing stock? Just look at the speed that Dubia emerged from the desert, and even the sea. The UK housing crisis could be completed in less than one generation. The problem of successive governments relying too heavily on the private sector and I agree that this only serves to drive up prices. I also agree that the current incentives you have listed are pointless. They are designed to win votes, not to solve real housing issues. Post war, the population was re-housed very quickly. Coventry was flatt
  8. The biggest issue that I have in terms of selling the Deed of Assurance concept to landlords is the "why should I attitude". This is far easier to explain in the provinces where it is more difficult to find and replace good tenants, however, in areas such as London where there is a huge queue of tenants for every available property its a major issue. IMHO it would be far better to increase the supply of property. This is because it is the supply/demand issues that fires the capitalism causing the problems. Imagine if there were more rental properties available than tenants. The cost of rentin
  9. The relationship between a tenant and landlord should one of a working business relationship. No business relationship can survive if it is one sided and a party refuses to assist in making it work. A Landlord may have no option but to sell. Why try and stop them from replacing the owner rather than the tenant? Isn't that akin to cutting ones nose off to spite ones face. Let me put this another way in the form of an analogy; if I stay in a hotel and refuse to allow the maid into the room I can hardly complain when I have no clean towels can I? The status quo right now is that if a landlord
  10. I think it's more likely that those people you speak of will sell conventionally, i.e. to owner occupiers, with or without a correction in house prices. Can anybody here provide me with some stats on how many properties were sold in the last 12 months as a split between BTL buyers and owner occupiers please? My best guestimate is around two third of purchases were to owner occupiers and one third to landlords but that's based on anecdotal evidence as opposed to in depth research.
  11. Thank you for sharing the counter-arguments, this thread is now transforming into a constructive debate. I appreciate that I've wandered into the dragons den and to many HPC members my views are likely to be about a popular as a fart in a space suit. Nevertheless, I'm happy to ignore the ignorant and have a sensible debate with people like your good self. Much like the NLA, I am pro-landlord, although I do disagree with the NLA on several issues. FWIW I am not an NLA member, I'm not even sure they'd have me, I'm too maverick for them! There are several reasons that I have yet to raise in te
  12. I came up with the concept yes. Several of my tenants are elderly, disabled or have young children with special needs. Many of them had previously had bad experiences with amateur PRS landlords who promised them they could stay long term and then decided to sell up as soon as the initial 6 or 12 month fixed term AST came to an end. These poor people had barely unpacked and got settled only to learn they had to find new homes and fund the costs of moving through no fault of their own. I wanted to offer my tenants more than a verbal promise. I want nice long term tenants and I was prepared to pu
  13. I'm interested in what you have to say. Please explain further how you see the notices given by homeowners working and on what basis it is different to section 21. What are the provisions that you think would "come back"? What act of former legislation are you referencing please? I'm pleased you like the Deed of Assurance concept at least in principle. The beauty of it is that the landlord cannot be judge and jury. In the event of a dispute over whether compensation is due it would be settled by the Small Claims Courts, and as with Deposit Protection disputes the burden of proof rests with t
  14. I don''t think it is as black or white as that Neverwhere. If section 8 eviction procedures could become more effective (Court times, bailiff turnaround times etc.) then I doubt section 21 notices would be used anywhere near as much. However, if I was a home-owner wanting to let my property for a year or so whilst working away/abroad I would be campaigning hard to retain section 21. Same goes for young couples renting a property whilst they try out living together. As a professional landlord, in the business for the long term, I offer my tenants a Deed of Assurance. If you don't know what t
  15. Thank you for your feedback and well wishes. I'm not looking to use this forum for promotion, I was alerted to the thread by Google and didn't like what I was reading so felt compelled to reply.
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