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notnow

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Everything posted by notnow

  1. For those people who were in the process of buying, does the team think mortgage offers will be being re evaluated with some urgency right now, with many people finding that agreed mortgage offers are withdrawn ? Or will lenders ease the path for buyers to catch a falling knife?
  2. Happy days are here again, Parkdean holiday camps have opened their 70 plus camps for bookings from a weeks time, May 15th. I guess their directors like prison food.
  3. Being close to retirement age means that i remember when politicians would come out of their house to face the press in the past. Their hair would be combed, they would be immaculately dressed, and their apology to the Queen, the party, the people, their family and freinds would be sincere. They would explain how the lie they told, the fraud they had committed or their betrayal of loved ones they had carried out meant that they were clearly not capable of holding public office. They would go on to explain that they would withdraw from public life, and look deeply within themselves to find why they had gone wrong. They would spend the rest of their lives trying to make up for all the hurt they had caused to those close to them. It makes me genuinly sad that the people now accept such low standards of behaviour from those that, while claiming to represent us, lie and cheat.
  4. Can I have a pound on being back in the EU and using the Euro within ten years please?
  5. Having given your comment some thought, I think I am more sad than bitter. Putting all politics aside, lets just think about one tiny part of leaving. Speaking as someone who has spent time living in Europe, while benefitting from health cover provided by the host country under EU treaties, it does sadden me that working,travelling and living in the EU will not be available as a right to future generations. Simply losing mutual health cover will change the way my children and granchildren will experience the world. The rich will be able to use their private health care across Europe. Everyone else will have no health cover which is illegal in Europe. They will also need a visa. Being retired and with a half decent pension will no longer mean retiring to Tuscany or wherever being an option. So thats one small issue. Now multiply that by the 1000 other issues covered by EU treaties. Yep that makes me sad. Life is too short and imperfect to spend time on bitterness.
  6. So Farage leads the countries voters into a frenzy of hatred of European rules ("they take our jobs!!!") , "wins" the Brexit vote, celebrates with a pint and then resigns as leader and then leaves UKIP because its racist???? If I had led the countries voters down a catastrophic path, I would disassociate myself from my actions as well. I worry about the future Mr.Farage.
  7. A full understanding of the content of all the treaties we signed up to, (some good and some bad), should have been a pre requisite of having your vote counted in the referendum. Fancy taking early retirement after your windfall/inheritance/lottery win to live in France/Spain after end of March? Good luck with that. What a sad inward looking little irrelevance UK has become.
  8. Hi spyguy, , thanks for your comment, I have edited my post to make it clearer that B did not sell my house. When you wrote " If you have to pay B that means they have sold your house" you would expect that . But what if they did not sell your house?. They just bought the contracts from an insolvent agent, and sent out bills to those who exchanged completely by their own work around the time of the insolvency. Some people may not mind that. But I did. If I employ A, I expect to pay A, (or their insolvency practitioner), not B. If I get an invoice from B, I expect an explanation from B, not just a demand to pay up. The point of my post is to say that if people do not want to be in that position, a good start is to mark any contract as non assignable before signing.
  9. Should you sign that contract with an estate agent as it is?. I am not an expert in contracts, but I think that some recent experiences with estate agencies going bust may make readers here think about the wording of contracts they may be about to sign. Say you choose and sign up with Agency A. How would you feel if the bill you eventually received was from agency B who are completely unknown to you and who you never had a contract with , and worse, that you had to pay it? This does happen. If agency A goes bust, agency B may walk in and take over the contracts, even after you have exchanged contracts and send you the bill . This is an assignment of contracts. It happens. Obviously Agency B should have written to you with a full explanation of the contract assignment, for your solicitor to check. But we are dealing with estate agents here. Some agents do not think they have to act like a business. They just take the money with the minimum of work. They may not even respond to solicitors letters. I would only ever sign a non assignable contract now. This means that insolvency accountants may have a claim on your payment, depending on the timing of the insolvency, but a random estate agency will not. Is this a serious issue? It has been estimated in the more upmarket press that 20% of estate agencies may go bust this year, so yes, it’s a serious issue. The going rate for selling has been pushed down in many areas to 0.8% or even less, due to competition for sales and the rise of the cheap fixed fee online sellers. This low income puts many estate agencies, especially those paying huge fees for franchises - which is most of them - in a precarious financial position. I have no connection with any agents, but I have had a bad experience with an insolvent agent. You guessed it - I had to pay an agent I never signed up with. For those who think I should not have paid, remember that I would have then been chased through the courts. I just wish my contract had been marked non assignable.
  10. Should you sign that contract with an estate agent as it is?. I am not an expert in contracts, but I think that some recent experiences with estate agencies going bust may make readers here think about the wording of contracts they may be about to sign. Say you choose and sign up with Agency A. How would you feel if the bill you eventually received was from agency B who are completely unknown to you and who you never had a contract with , and worse, that you had to pay it? This does happen. If agency A goes bust, agency B may walk in and take over the contracts, even after you have exchanged contracts and send you the bill . This is an assignment of contracts. It happens. Obviously Agency B should have written to you with a full explanation of the contract assignment, for your solicitor to check. But we are dealing with estate agents here. Some agents do not think they have to act like a business. They just take the money with the minimum of work. They may not even respond to solicitors letters. I would only ever sign a non assignable contract now. This means that insolvency accountants may have a claim on your payment, depending on the timing of the insolvency, but a random estate agency will not. Is this a serious issue? It has been estimated in the more upmarket press that 20% of estate agencies may go bust this year, so yes, it’s a serious issue. The going rate for selling has been pushed down in many areas to 0.8% or even less, due to competition for sales and the rise of the cheap fixed fee online sellers. This low income puts many estate agencies, especially those paying huge fees for franchises - which is most of them - in a precarious financial position. I have no connection with any agents, but I have had a bad experience with an insolvent agent. You guessed it - I had to pay an agent I never signed up with. For those who think I should not have paid, remember that I would have then been chased through the courts. I just wish my contract had been marked non assignable. I would always avoid using an agent that is a franchise as well, as they have huge fees to pay, and are the first to go bust. Give me the local independent villain, rather than the franchised chain, or better still - why use an agent at all?.
  11. Has anyone had a bill from w h brown for estate agent services when they have no contract with them?
  12. 8 Norfolk branches gone in Hunters insolvency and more than twenty jobs gone. National press is saying 20% of agents are reporting being in In financial difficulties. Its starting to look a little like 2007 all over again, sales numbers are stalling, estate agents rates are getting lower due to the cut throat nature of the business at the moment. Anyone else see similarities between 2007 and now - with very different causes obviously.
  13. I very rarely post these days, but I feel the need to say it seems to me that I am seeing 2007 all over again, only from a rather different standpoint. There are a lot of people in my circle of friends that keep on saying the same thing, and that is that they are financially worried. These are people who would normally be impervious to a bit of a dip.
  14. Come on Masked Tulip, its not that bad! O.K. so the time to buy a house was years ago for those in high HPI areas. Also the time to go and live in France/Spain ets was years ago, before the rules were changed by the EU making it harder to work and be in the social system in your adopted country. So, if the housing market is mad where you are, then move. Its cr*p here ! (East Anglia) . Its worth it though, there are quiet country lanes everywhere, beer is good , life is slower. The natives are friendly and they speak English - sort of.
  15. I tend to watch land registry figures for sales volume, which lag by 3 months (why?) . I wonder if there is a trend now? Norfolk lost 36% of sales in May 2008 post apocalypse, compared to May 2007. From 2009 to 2012 similarly the lost sales are 46%, 43%, 45%, and 41%. All very steady and the lack of buyers showed in the stuck market. Less demand equals lower prices... However..... This year the same sales volume figure is "only" 25% down on pre 2008 figures. Its a sudden gain of around 350 sales out of 700 needed to recover sales to "normal" pre 2008 figures. All down to the various Gov't attempts to lift the market I guess. The next few months will show if its a blip. Broadland certainly has seen an increase in sold signs , although the stupidly overpriced and sadly unloved are still sticking very badly.
  16. You cannot live retired in another EU country before your OAP date and be covered for health costs. Others have explained this at length. The biggest issue though is for those that google the average income of a country , calculate they will have as much or more, so think they will be OK. They will end up as peasants, with a hand to mouth existance. The average wage in the part of europe I lived in (retired ) for some years was 10k euros. I was on double that and was just about Ok - because I wanted to live like I did in the UK, not walking the lanes looking for firewood and apples. The euro rate and change in health laws has killed the dream of the cottage in France or the villa in Spain, except for the very well off.
  17. You probably already use propertybee, but if not I can highly recommend it. Rather than the figures you have been looking at, it gives you all the history of all properties attempts at selling. Original prices, price drops, sold then back for sale etc. Its like being able to read the mind of the seller. There are ways round it for very savvy sellers but I wont expand on that here !
  18. Thankyou for your kind words. Campervanman I do realise my comments were not all encompassing, as the subject of getting into the French system would take pages and pages to cover completely. I am sure you know that. There are a number of very good expat sites that cover the complexities of the French health system and the nightmare some expats find themselves in. Forums full of genuinely frightened people who are being turned away from care. All of the points you make are correct, but i know people who are still trying to get cover in France after going to live the dream, (and I guess you do as well), who did not do research which you obviously have done. You are probably aware that it is the pre OAP age early retired people with some money that find they are not covered. You clearly know that the french insist on private health insurance for "inactifs" for the first 5 years. Full cover costs around £60,000 for the 5 years required for a couple. I agree my comments were too basic for some, so may I just say that if anyone is reading this and thinking of going to live in france, please please do your research first. And may I suggest that you rent, do not buy, until you are sure you want to stay there. Google something like "stuck in France" Campervanman, I hope to live in France again someday, but I will rent, and I will be over OAP age so that I will get my E121 - or is it S1 - so that I can apply for healthcare, and contribute in france. Of course this means that I will lose my right to healthcare in the UK and my right to an ehic card. Which part are you in? Shall we take about wills in france now???? Oooooh don't get me started
  19. Early retirement financed by UK house price inflation and very cheap houses in France saw Brits buy in droves, until 2007. Then the French law concerning non working EU residents changed, simply put they were left with no health cover. Now people are desperate to get back to UK. France is beautiful, but living there can be hard. Selling a house in france takes years.
  20. I envy your inheritance, but not the massive tax bill you are going to get. Its 16%.
  21. "Can I afford the payments?" was obviously always part of the buying process, but now the concept of value has been lost. Our used cars are very cheap compared to most of Europe, our new cars are more expensive than most of Europe. Hence the new car buyer in UK takes such a massive hit that salesmen now focus on the "Only £299 a month Sir" A cash buyer must be quite hard to sell to, as it is clear that the deal is to give say £30k for a car and three years later you have lost half that amount, at least. Worst investment you can make, financially. - correction - second worst.
  22. Insurance does not pay out on fools who keep money in a shoebox. Perhaps the first £300 is covered if entry is forced. Not "taxing" the small saver - who is covered under euro law anyway , is the only good thing to come out of the final decision. Who would want to be a banker or politician in Cyprus now ? ( target for hitmen ?)
  23. http://www.rightmove.co.uk/property-for-sale/property-35582965.html 40% off, that must be some sort of record? It is rather out of the way, but even so....
  24. They told you the other offer value ? Do you believe all this? Can I sell you my car? It is worth £50,000 but you can have it for £20,000, but be quick, there are lots of people after it....... Seriously though, I do respect and understand you, this is a classic case of heart ruling head, been there.... Now that I am older and a little wiser, my rules are to view, and then contact the agent in writing with the following and stick to it :- 1.You intend to make an offer, 2. You intend to walk away if it is not accepted or there is any other interest. 3. If it is accepted you will proceed to completion with all haste. The secret to good buying at the moment is to find the desperate seller who does not mind admitting it. They do exist. In your case, it would be very interesting to not make an offer and to talk to the vendor to explain that the agent says it is as good as sold.
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