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MrMagoo

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About MrMagoo

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  1. napkin maths aside, is the above not actually the point of why a steep tax of 1% is so punitive in this (home tax) equation. you work hard, pay all the above tax, then buy a nice house as a "reward". Some people might buy a nice car (they pay VAT etc for the privilege). Others might go on many holidays (VAT again). Someone foregoes those, but buys a house that just happens to be beyond the "normal" multiples, end up paying a lot of interest for the privilege (under normal circumstances in any case). Then they have to pay an extra 5 or 10k a year on top, out of money that they have already been taxed on. To have any semblance of fairness, and in principle I am not against those which costlier homes paying more (as current council tax bands are too close together with not enough of a spread). Would the tax on wealth not have to also take the following into consideration: Apply some tapering to the equity gain to take inflation into account. Tax only the gains made since the purchase (allowing for any debt used at time of purchase, but now allowing MEW to be taken into consideration) - after all, income tax has already been paid on any capital repaid, and that is not a gain in any case) Allow maintenance costs (within defined limits to avoid abuse)* to be offset proportional to the gains (after all the gains would not be as much if the property was not maintained). Apply some form of smoothing to the gains curve, to prevent steep spikes year to year. Fall with HPC as well as rise with HPI - after all if paper gains are being taxed, surely the amount payable should reduce with paper falls in the value. Have a normalisation process when the property is sold - a bit like applying CGT to the gains - so that the real gain, if indeed there is any, is realised. * I can see this being a loophole. People spending money on home improvements - therefore in theory pushing up their paper gain, but at the same time reducing their home tax liability to zero. Then realising the "return" at the time of sale.
  2. Apple must be bricking it. Though given that they make more profit out of their mobile business than Samsung, HTC, Nokia and RIm combined, I doubt it. Whichever makes the best HW/SW combo, and every fanboy has their fav, it seems clear which has the best business model at the moment. http://www.macrumors.com/2012/02/03/apples-share-of-profits-among-top-mobile-phone-vendors-hits-75/ quite a feat when you consider that between them, Nokia and Samsung sell nearly 10x the number of units http://www.macrumors.com/2012/02/01/apple-passes-lg-to-become-worlds-third-largest-mobile-phone-manufacturer/ I bet the execs at LG's mobile division are in a bit of a flat spin though. Incidentally, IOS has ralied slightly against Android, at least in the US, in in recent quarters proved at least as popular if not moreso. http://www.macrumors.com/2012/01/26/ipad-grabs-58-of-tablet-shipments-in-4q-2011/ I'd wager that LG and Samsung make more money making and selling components to Apple than they do from competing with them in similar market segments.
  3. I've not looked at mass builders cost base in details, but since they mostly build crap to date, I would deduce the figures in their financial reports are based on current material standards. IF they upped their specs, no doubt they could still acheive economies of scale, but their material costs and labour costs would be higher. Relative to self build quite likely cheaper than today, but better building also needs better skills therefore more expensive trades. attention to detail also costs time. Of course they could build bigger and better if the land was far cheaper, I was just suggesting that the houses might still not be quite as cheap as another poster imagned, certainly not that much more interesting architectually. Maybe like staring at a fleet of 5 series all parked in wide bays, rather than a fleet of Astras parked in a Supermarket car park.
  4. Ok, therevare nice blue skies, and the houses are not too close together compared to worst I've seen in the UK, but at any price those homes don't look much better than glorified sheds!
  5. Ignoring land costs etc, just focusing on materials and labour, I'd suggest that you'd stuggle to build to a high quality on anything but a perfect isite for £550 a m2, which is what you are suggesting, even in the cheapest regions of the UK. You might be able to get a structure for that, but to have it built to a German standard AND kitted out with floor coverings, fixtures and fittings etc, you'd nearly need to double that number. I'd venture £800 would be much nearer the mark, and then you'd be talking UK style fixtures. On the subject of asthetics, this is mainly down to a lack of immagination on the part of builders, and lazyness on the part of Brit house buyers. Most just don't want the astle. Most of the team I work with who live on the continent bult their own homes, or bought from self builders who moved on. None in the UK have done the same. The chepest construction is usually a dull box shape, start with any odd shapes, angles, unusual materials and the price can quicly exceed £1000 m2. From talking to collegues in Germany, Belgium, France and Italy, this is about the same all over, give or take 10% and ignoring extreme fluctuations in exchange rates. I'm not trying to act trollish, just saying, based on personal experience. It costs a lot more than you think to build quality.
  6. Out of interest, how big is the house? I'm guessing approx. 180 to 220 m2 for that type of budget, fully kitted. Or is it larger and that is the cost to build out to dry shell?
  7. 1) Yes, but a lifetime BoE tracker is much the same today is it not? Ok, not quite that low, but not far off. 2) Yes it would, but I expect "growth" would be a lot slower. That'd surely upset the politicians unable to meddle with GDP stats and the like. 3) Or set expectations contrary to what we are supposed to be programmed to strive for.
  8. Those who subscribe to Sky best stock up on Vaseline.
  9. In principle I like the idea, but implementation would be incredibly difficul if not impossible if done by any government we've seen in recent years! Bing bang approach? would cause chos Slow drip approach: would cause hardship for those with jobs, with little in return fore those without. who's going to hire someone for a few hours a week whils the adjustment is made? Certainly companies would not be made to carry costs which would ease the pain for workers! Having said that, I quite like the notion of taking more time off as a reward/dividend for performance. I.e rather than take a pay rise, take a pro rata reduction in hours. Something I was coincidentally discussing this evening with my partner not long before i noticed this thread: more pay or more time off work. The big problem is that the practicalites in the workplace for many jobs/professions, don't lend themselves to such discussions.
  10. i completely agree. General grade inflation, combined with what can only be described as a general deflation in average graduate apptitude, surely could not result in anything other than measures where the institutions who have targetted the highers "acheivers" shifting the goal posts accordingly. The same is true of so called "graduate" salaries that was the topic of another recent thread. I dare say most of today's graduates would not have had a hope in hell in getting into the Universities of the past, any more than they would have of getting the best grad/milkround type jobs. They'd have left school with o levels or maybe gone to a poly. PS: I'm not a boomer, but went to an ex poly! Though I blame that on Thatcher for stealing my milk, otherwise I'm sure I'd have received a 1st from Oxford.
  11. I think ofit in terms of the way the NHS has made more and more treatments available, which should mean that the population at large is healthier, yet the result for substantial numbers is obesity, heart conditions, drink related etc all on a dramatic rise. I e recklessness is rewarded because of an implied safety net. The difference being that the public did not have any say in the removal of the protections that previously existed (or if they did not exist should have been put in place) to prevent bankers doing the same. Human nature at its worst in many areas of society has screwed things for everyone and the sensible are paying the price, just as the slim, t-total none smoker does. PS: Anyone know how to get this RFID chip out of my neck? Lol
  12. One of the benefits of modern "tablet" devices is that they don't have keyboards into which the contents of recently consumed beverages can be spat. Otherwise I'd be off to PC world in the morning, only to come back and then fail to post that here was nothing in stock! :-)
  13. Bacon butties and inexcusably shoddy service aside, might the low stock situation be a normal occurance after the festive and sales "frenzies" of the past month? Certainly might explain the lack of joysticks and board games. What with the economy being fecked and everyone being spent out, would it really make sense for retailers to be stockedup to the eyeballs with such product lines? I'm not convinced it would. slightly off topic, but I wonder if the increased demand for de-humidifiers is a function of people blocking up the ventilation in their homes so as to mitigate the effects of fuel saving in the face of rising costs? Though as this would be counter productive in the long term regarding maintenance, this might be an illogical conclusion. Since everyone in the country is apparently living in a MEW'd to the eyeballs new build rabit hutch, are there really that many single glazed, poorly ventilated homes these days? i would think that a heat revover measure applied to the ventilation would be a better long term investment than a de-humidifier. (last comment not aimed at the OP) just a general though based on another post which suggested sales were up.
  14. With jobs like this in the area propping it up I suppose: http://www.careersforleaders.com/JobDetails.aspx/5473/Head_of_Street_Scene The house itself looks like a council house though. Does not look very well built or appointed.
  15. You should have gone to Debenhams. They had their regular ranges of suites and work clothes are what seemed like real discounts. At least 50% off in many cases. I managed to pick up a set of luggage there, cases down from £195 to £84.
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