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thejaksie

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About thejaksie

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    HPC Poster
  1. thejaksie

    London Rent Rise

    I've noticed rents are dropping rapidly. Looking a bit to move , the agents are DESPERATE several voicemails everyday. easily 10-20% discounts on everything (price category 2200-2750 PCM)
  2. My my, here I am checking back in to enjoy some great updates of the latest reductions instead it appears I've joined arguingcouples.com? Has anyone seen any concrete evidence of reductions, blood in the street type stories? Need a bit of positive (ie negative) news to keep me from falling into a housing induced depression. Best bit so far is foxtons at 50 % below ipo price... The other that a French dude I sort of know bought a flat 2 weeks before brexit, he was duly warned
  3. anecdotally this week a variety of colleagues were mentioning that london is coming down hard. What surpirsed me is how several people matter of factly mentioned it in passing, as if it wasn't a surprise and widely known. The news of the Big London Crash is finally making it to the wider population
  4. Awesome I would love to see them go under. Would break open the champage. They are just opening another branch in maida vale FFS, there are already 6 or 7 agents servicing 20 streets. doomed to fail
  5. thejaksie

    Ea Fees + Comission

    I used housenetwork.co.uk, fixed price 600 quid or so . Sold it (in the end, took a while but that was the market), all in all good service I thought and would use again. Only downside you need to do your own viewings but I didn't mind that so much. Take as long as you possibly can to do a 360 with an extended arm in a small room as if you're showing of acres of land . quite fun edit: it's not bad to do your own viewings as alternatively you need often leave your house, and logistically more difficult which was my main reason I didn't mind it
  6. I can give a bit more insight into this I suspect.the flats above are not in the nicest areas, Amsterdam in the nicer areas are now selling at 6 up to 10k per m2, and the Hague somewhere around 4-5k also in nicer areas. So although cheaper it's not bargain basement by any standard and that is actually not too far off where I'm looking to buy in london commuter belt (perhaps eventually!) with prices at gbp 4-5k m2. However, the additional benefit is that mortgage interest is tax deductible, so on those prices the government still subsidises marginal rate tax too (53%). The property values outside the 4 bigger cities have taken a hammering since 2007 and are still 25-35% below 2007. I know lots of ppl who have been trying to sell for years, 1 I know of had been trying to sell for 7 years...! What is also interesting to observe is that there has been a lot of new builds bit this did not keep the bubble in check pre 2007.
  7. thejaksie

    Thank You For Graham Recommendation

    The best investor book ever written
  8. This loan from the government sounds strange, what are the interest charges on it? 1.75% but linked to RPI seems strange. Also what happens to that loan if the property value goes down > do they share the downside risk?
  9. thejaksie

    Going 100% Property Or Taking On Debt?

    I've been wondering the same - my conclusion is to (once the time is ready to buy) go for a small mortgage you can easily afford for diversity purposes. For instance it's not beyond the wildest imagination to see government driven mortgage debt cancellation. Debt is also a great inflation hedge PROVIDED you fix the interest rate as long as possible. The last point isn't followed by majority UK debtors, before long they will have a sweet reminder of interest rate risk IMHO.
  10. thejaksie

    Investing Using A Management Company

    Great to see you're making steps into diy investing. It's a great feeling to realise that most financial advisors and investment managers don't have special tricks up their sleeves and you can do it too. At a much lower cost. Some advisors are outright scammers. The only thing to point out is that you state you want to buy a house soon and may need the cash, don't forget that with a majority share driven portfolio you can see some big declines and this needs to fit your risk appetite. Investing in shares is not a cash alternative. You need to consider For instance if you lost 25% on this portfolio over 2 years (quite possible) how would this make you feel, and how would this impact your other financial plans? If you're not comfortable with that possible loss you may want to consider a higher bond percentage,like LS40 or 60.
  11. He clearly hasn't read the bit where it informs you that 60% of new builds get sold below the first sale price. There was one great example in my search area CM23, 550k in 2004, 375 in 2008, 495k in 2014, now on the market for 535k. That is still not at original price 12 years later! And the market generally is probably 2007 + 20%. Whahahahhaha
  12. thejaksie

    Investing Using A Management Company

    And for a good fund have a look at the vanguard lifestrategy funds. For instance the lifestrategy 60 (60% shares 40%bonds) or lifestrategy 80 (80/20%) are suitable for long term investment, at 0.24% all in costs. Depending on your risk appetite and hold period you can have more or less shares %. Very easy, well diversified, and low cost. And will do as well or better than most of not all active funds. Www.vanguard.co.uk You open an account at www.iii.co.uk or so, put your money in. Place an order to buy the relevant vanguard fund. Happy days. But remember, if can go up as well as down!
  13. thejaksie

    Would You Buy A House Now ?

    Ok I will come clean, I've put a yes down. terrible I know - it's defintinetly not that I think this is a wise financial choice - and I see all the downside risks and no upward pressures other than fierce inflation (which would rise IR). If I could live my life without having to ever to enter this ponzi scheme I happily would. Don't really know why but it feels I have thrown in the towel in the fight (against stupidity )and decided to go on with life and in that I would like to have a nice family home. Having said that we've been looking for a year and within that timeframe we've seen only 2 houses we liked (and were sort of reasonably priced against the utter crap out there) - and didn't get either. In other words we remain relatively diligent and unwilling to compromise. I suspect that in effect having criteria against a budget means we're not really buying because for 99.5% of houses you need to be pretty stupid to buy in this market.
  14. thejaksie

    Investing Using A Management Company

    far too expensive - especially as the funds they will invest in will charge on top and you don't know what risk profile they will invest in. you can easily do this yourself. I manage much more than that myself , it's easy. in today's low return environment you can expect returns of 2-4% after inflation in the long run so paying out 1-2% of that in fees is pretty pointless. This is a great site run by a fellow HPC'er: http://www.retirementinvestingtoday.com What you invest in largely depends on your horizon. Vanguard are a great fund manager - and generally the cheapest in the world, with a good seleciton of funds. If you are lucky fund managers will just place your money in those and charge 0.75% for doing so, if you're unlucky they will place them in funds that do the same but charge another 1.00%. Keep your costs down is my key mantra
  15. I str in 2012. Timing wrong, but would do it again . I didn't str just for the sake of it, wanted to move in any case and didn't want to buy. Renting has been great for me I have to say. Especially when I took a year off from work to travel - with no property hassle
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