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flyingscotsman

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About flyingscotsman

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  1. Topping the "best offer" if outbid was the plan I mentioned in my starting post. And of course we'll only go as high as we dare
  2. Hi We submitted an offer for a house being sold by an estate agent who is acting on behalf of the bank. The offer has been rejected and we have now been asked to submit our "best offer" together with more formal information on our circumstances - e.g. what finance is in place etc. Our understanding is that in house sales like these you can put in an offer and then even if it is accepted you can still be beaten by a better offer until contracts have been exchanged. The estate agent informs us that when an offer has been accepted it will be advertised as such with an invite to further potential bidders. Therefore I think we should just make a slightly better offer and if it is again rejected we ask how we will find out what the accepted offer is. My guess is will show up on Rightmove as that is where the house is currently advertised. We can then decided whether to improve upon the last offer we made. The idea that we should just come up with our "best offer" now does not seem acceptable to us. Any advice on how to handle circumstances like this would be much appreciated. Thank you.
  3. For those people who went for option 1 isn't there a possibility that if they wanted - or had to due to a change in circumstances - sell their house that they may not recoup their initial outlay. I assume that they would value the house with a premium to cover the cost of the installation and the potential income. But potential buyers may: a.not want the hassle of dealing with the contactual issues - or their percieved contracual hassles b they may not like having solar panels and conside them unsightly c not agree with the the buyer with the valuation of the house that includes the premium for the solar panels - the seller is unlilely to ever get the value they think it is worth
  4. My thoughts were that whether I or the vendor paid for the PIR report then the comeback will be on the electrician should anything go wrong since they will be registered with NICEIC or other recognised organisation. As it is I am leaning towards paying for the report and asking the vendors to pay for any work required.
  5. For some time I've been thinking that supermarket shopping has become a new pastime rather than a necessity. It doesn't matter what day of the week it is - what time of time - or which supermarket. They all seem to be busy busy busy. Now my wife does most of our shopping so I am little out of touch on prices. But what I have noticed is that in years gone by prices used to go up by a few pence - but supermarkets now think nothing of slapping 10-15p on routine items and in some cases just doubling them. It truly is astounding. And one thing we have always been very careful about is that we have zero wastage in our house. Not a single item of food is ever thrown out. Our meal and snack sizes are big enough to satisfy our appetites and no more. If you are throwing food out because you've let it go past its sell by date or you cooked too much then you might as well lift the lit on the bin and empty your purse or wallet into it.
  6. I did see the second half but not sure I comprehend what you are hinting at Unless it is a newbuild - which it isn't - then the house will be previously occupied. So how does that changes things?
  7. Hi I've been reading about periodic inspections (PIR) here on the Electrical Safety Council website. They advise that a PIR should be done: In much the same way that a buyer would pay for a structural survey - or pay for various tradesman to view and report on the house - I thought the onus would be on the buyer to pay for the PIR. I am mindful that even structural survey's usually advise getting someone qualified to check electrical - or plumbing - or whatever it may be. So again I thought this was suggesting putting the responsibility for arranging and paying for this additional inspections onto the buyer. Or if buying a home is it reasonable to ask for the vendor to arrange and pay for a PIR?
  8. I had kind of thought that this would be the answer - at least for this work. Some of the issues can be addressed by the vendor - e.g. servicing a boiler etc.
  9. So - got the Homebuyer Report from the surveyor today and overall not too bad. Structurally the house is sound - it is a couple of issues inside that are a concern. Comments regarding electricity suggest the installation appears dated and there are safety deficiencies. For example the consumer unit does not incorporate modern circuit protection devices and there is limited evidence of earth cross bonding. The opinion of the surveyor is that the installation should be brought up to modern standards. I am going to speak to the surveyor and ask if this means the house needs re-wiring throughout. The other issues are that the house is centrally heated by an oil fired boiler and has not been tested for 18 months and getting a sweep to check the living room flue. The plan was to go back to the estate agent to make them aware of the issues and get them to put it to the vendor that they seek to resolve them before exchanging contracts. There is also the problem of the house we want to buy being 3 hours away so it is difficult for us to arrange getting quotes for work to be done if we were to take on this responsibility. Our view being that since the vendors are obviously in the house and in a much better position to have the work done that is recommended by the surveyor. For those of you reading this who have been in similar situations how did you resolve to have issues sorted out before committing to the purchase. Any advice would be gratefully received.
  10. Hi everyone - sorry for all the questions - perhaps if I learn anything from this experience I can give back to others. Our solicitor has applied for all "necessary searches" against our new property. In her letter she also advises that there are 2 additional searches that she can obtain: Environmental at £49 and Chancel Repair Check at £18. I've done a ton of searches - no pun intended - in these forums and the intarwebz and I am thinking we can't avoid them. I've been on one website - homecheck.co.uk I think - and after putting in the post code of the new property nothing much was flagged up except maybe pat industrial use of the land sicne it is in a village. As far as the Chancel search goes I don't think we take the risk of not taking out the search. I have no idea of these search costs are reasonable but it does stick in my throat that they were not mentioned at the time I asked for a quote. Is the concensus of the forum just to suck it and pay up for peace of mind? As always and thoughts would be appreciated.
  11. Many thanks to Spark and InLikeFlynn for your additional comments - I will certainly be taking up some of these issues with the surveyor and our solicitor.
  12. Thanks GC - that gives me some measure of comfort. It looks like the roof of the garage of the house we are buying has a pitch of about 6 inches from right to left as you look at it head on. There is a gutter and drain pipe on the left side to take away rainwater. Anyone know if there is a minimum pitch height at which a roof is no longer considered flat? One of the other reasons I ask is that my wife was getting a quote for building insurance and of course they ask if there is any part of the building that has a flat roof. They also ask for overall percentage of the total roofing that is flat. The main part of the house has the normal roof as it is a semi-detached bunglow and I would say that the garage roof takes up approx 1/5th of the total roof surface area. Just wondering if we can avoid adding to the insurance costs by declaring that there is no flat roof if a 6 inch pitch would clear this.
  13. Hi The property we are interested in has a built in garage that has been converted to a kitchen. The garage looks very similar to those on this street: hope this link works - should be a row of houses with flat roofed garages We are having the house we are purchasing surveyed and will also personally inspect it to see if I can see anything obvious that doesn't look right. Just wondered if anyone on here would concern themselves with this type of roof. There are a lot of house in the street I have linked to above with such roofs and the property we are looking at in another town has many houses with similar roofs.
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