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Kinky John

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Everything posted by Kinky John

  1. Gotta love those google map hacks; http://flood.firetree.net/ Drag the slider ... watch them drown. Hours of global warming westminster flooding fun.
  2. I reckon that people at that level of wealth no longer have to care about the future value of the land & property they buy. It's just a posturing game to show who is the richest and most extravegant; and not an investment. Got to have something to blag about at the golf club. Of course they will stop doing it as soon as economic conditions change and they feel their wealth is threatened, but in the meantime I think it's nice that there is still one area of the market where a house is consider a consumable item and not an investment
  3. Well, in my experience (London) estate agents usually charge about 100-200 quid "arrangement fees, " and may tack on absolute absurdities like 50 quid for a credit check. If you hassle them you can usually get it reduced; and if they think you'll walk they usually come around. They're all desperate at the moment anyway (BIG difference to a year ago I can tell you) so I suspect you'll have some good barganing power. It should be cheaper outside London too. As to the safer thing, that depends. If the estate agent is actually managing the property rather than simply finding a tenant for an independent landlord then it probably is safer. They will obey the law, such as checking gas appliances, and not coming around unannounced. They will also get inexpensive things fixed relatively effectively and promptly. However, do not expect stellar service. Also expect them to try and thieve at least some of your deposit as a matter of routine. If you get an independent landlord (either through something like loot or through an estate agent), then you are open to both the best and worst of the renting world. You could easily wind up with a nightmare landlord who will come around unannounced, won't fix things and will steal your deposit. On the other hand, you might get some absolute darling who appologises for coming around on Sunday afternoon to do the garden, and who gives the whole deposit back even though you left a big mark on the living room wall (speaking from experience). I advise going through loot, if you've got time to search and can keep your wits about you (get an inventory, check out the person who will be looking after the property etc. etc.); it'll save you money and get you a nicer place if you get it right. If you gotta get somewhere quick then try an estate agent.... Remember, no matter what happens that as a tennant the law is ABSOLUTELY wholeheartedly not on your side. It's esoteric, and always requires action from the tenant (rather than the land lord). Even if you have enough for the solicitors to get it enforced the penalties on landlords are pathetic. If in doubt - don't sign! it's not easy to force them to give your deposit back if they don't want to give it; it's not easy to force them to fix something that you didn't realise was broken; it's not easy to get them to leave you alone. Hope that helps.
  4. Hey there, Well, your friend is in a similar mess to me. I recently signed a shorthold on a flat that has transpired to have mold problems. Being an athsmatic this is not a good thing, and it is certainly not somewhere I can tolerate for six months. After examining the law on the matter it is clear to me that tennants in a shorthold tennancy are second class citizens in comparison to landlords. It's roughly equivalent to signing your soul to the devil in blood (but thankfully only for six months). However, your friend hasn't signed anything - just cancel the direct debit and leave. There is nothing binding him to the place, and if the landlord isn't co-operative in returning the deposit you will get it returned tho it will probably take some sort of legal action. In the meantime make sure you have proof of his son's condition and that his noise sensitivity is confirmed by a doctor. Make sure you don't sign anything ever, and make sure you do not pay any rent. Apparently paying rent is equivalent to accepting the terms of tennancy. Keep all communications to the landlord or agency in writting and then get a solicitor. Let me assure you that the law is absolutely not on your side here (probably part of the governments long term aim of making home owners), but also let me assure you that the law is flexible and your story is so sensible that you will do well. Be careful and get a solicitor NOW!
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