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_SUNDANCE

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About _SUNDANCE

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  1. Over the past month i have not been reading the forum as much as previously but now that we have settled in our new house i would hope to check in more often.
  2. We have decided to rent for the foreseeable future. In terms of economics i think it makes sense to rent with house prices going to fall further. Moreover, in terms of our individual life circumstances it also makes sense. We have a little boy and the whole house buying thing was so stressful in terms of raised hopes and then disappointments. I am sure there will be a time when buying will be our preferred choice but its unlikley to be within the next year. So happy at the moment in our new house ( albeit a rented house ). Our previous landlord give us notice to leave before christmass so with that backdrop negotaiting a house purchase was even more stressful. At times we felt we were in a real corner. Moved into the new house 5 weeks ago - two days after seeing it advertised. We were even able to negotiate quite a reduction in the rental asking price on the basis that we would take up immediate tenancy. A little surprised to see the house we had previously rented and wished to stay on in has now come back onto the market for rent - a month after we moved out. When we were given notice to leave after several years renting it it was because the landlord told us he had an offer to buy it from another party. This seemed strange as no one had ever viewed it. When we enquired we were told the offer was from a housing association but the deal could not be completed until we vacated as they would not complete with sitting tenants. We asked the price as buying this house may have been an option. We were told we could buy it if we matched the already agreed sale price but we had no decision to make when we were told the price. It was rateable value. This seemed a way over the top price as a house a few doors down in the same small development ( albeit a repossession but superior in terms of finish inside ) has come onto the market at rateable value minus 20% asking price and i expect it to sell at much less than its asking price. I found it hard to believe that a housing assocation would pay so much over the odds and even more bizare that my ex landlord ( a local estate agent ) could be so out of touch to think they would. At a lose to what was going on. I left this house 5 weeks ago with the landlord giving me a reference which stated i was the best tenant he ever had. I also received a full deposit back having left the house in very good condition. I even painted it a week before i left. I was paying £530 rent per callendar month and would have agreed for the rent to be increased to in the region of £560 had i stayed on. I paid cash every month in the office and never missed a payment ever. Now 5 weeks after i have left the house is being advertised for rent again at £500 per month, considerably less than i was paying. To boot even if the owner gets a new tenant soon he will have seen the property vacant for a time. We loved the house, mostly as it had so many memories and would have loved to have continued renting at the very least but at a total loss to what went on with regard to my notice to leave, a sale that was apparently agreed and the house now being marketed for rent again at a much lower rental figure.
  3. The tenancy is up on the house we presently rent and the landlord expects us out on Monday so busy looking for somewhere new. To be fair the months notice ended on christmass eve but we were given a few extra weeks to leave. However, we were hoping to move straight into the house we were planning to buy and that only fell through on Tuesday. Now we have to find somwhere by Monday. Got a text from the landlord this morning to say we would like the keys on Monday and that we owe two weeks rent. Never been behind in rent in several years renting the house. Thought he may have allowed for other things to have been more important over the past few weeks than squaring up the rent. Of course i knew i owed two weeks rent. I was not going to skip the country. If the vendor of the house we were interested does come back in a months time we will have moved on and wont have the same flexibility or desire to eneter into any new negotiations. Totally drained at the moment what with the stress of trying to buy a new house and also being a first time dad shortly before christmass. Looking forward to not even thinking about houses for a while and devoting more time to our little boy. Once again thanks everyone for all your advice and nice words.
  4. Thank you shotoflight for the nice words. Over and above the financial lose of the deal falling through we put so much time and hopes into this all.
  5. I know people will say you should not lose out on a house you like for a thousand or two pounds but we think we already were giving more than the house was worth. I mean where do you stop at adding another thousand or two on. There was only so far we could go in light of the work needed doing on this house. The difference between 125 and 130 was going to be a bridge too far. I doubt our final offer ( which came with intention of exchanging monies and keys with a few days ) with ever to bettered. The vendors have already seen one sale fall through. We give them certainty of completing within a very days but they seemed to want blood. My wife is very disappointed but we will move on. Just wanted to let you all know how things turned.
  6. To be fair to the estate agent i think he did all he could. He put a lot of time into the sale and i thanked him for all this afterwards. At the end of the day if a seller is stuck of a price there is nothing anyone can do. Next time we try to buy a house ( no plans for that in the near future ) i think i will handle things differently and better. Thanks everyone for all your help and advice.
  7. We would also point out we only had access to the deeds after we put in our initial offer of £130,000 and it was accepted. It was only then that we knew the ground rent figure and covenants. We understand the ground rent may never have been requested and even if it was it would be a small matter. However,legally the leasee can ask for this anytime and moreover request for any monies to be backdated six years. The ground rent is important in that we believe it is used to calculate the cost of buying out the leasehold. Think its multiplied by around 20 times and on top of that there would be solicitor fees and costs of changing deeds.It was always our intention to buy out the leasehold to the house following any puchase. Infact we explicitly said this was the case from an early stage in negotiations. This is another additional cost we had not accounted for. Prior to putting in our first offer we were led to believe during viewing it was only a technical matter of taking over the leasehold for a small nominal fee
  8. Sale has fallen through. Put in a new offer of £120,000 but too the unusual step of increasing it to £125,000 the following day even before we had a reply to the previous offer. Thought some of the things included in the £120,000 offer were unreasonabe and petty and did not want to come across as people the vendor did not want to sell to at any price. There is a fine line with bargaining hard and alienating the other party along the way. We did not wish to cross that line. Think our offer of £125,000 was more than fair. This new offer reflected the cost of certain work needing done but was appreciative of the fact its unreasonable to expect some of the things to be included that we initially listed. So we were happy to withdraw some of these items from any calculations.. The new offer reflected mostly the costs of updating the heating system and electrical works. We have itemised estimates for these both. However, the new offer was appreciative of the fact that we should also contribute a certain part of the money towards these things. Again any of the things we tried to renogiate the price on were things we put forward as unexpected late information. We entered into the initial agreed price of £130,000 in total good faith of completing the deal. Infact we withdrew the total ammount from a year long fixed savings account when we first saw our solicitor and he said the deal could be wrapped up within a very short time. The penalty for withdrawing the cash from this savings account ( which had only 6 months to mature ) was over £2,000. We are now walking away from the deal minus that ammount and more in fees. The reply from the vendor to our offer was that they would not take a penny less than the agreed initial price of £130,000. Wish we had known that before we paid for a builder, electrician and plumber to look at the house after we had seen the epc report. It would now seem it would not matter what these professional tradesmen had said.
  9. Oh and i have promised my wife not to get into any arguments ( at least for the time being ) on the legalities of the epc reports and who should tell who what and at what stage.
  10. I could not meet the relevent other party today due to understandable personal reasons on their side. I will tomorrow. I have calmed down a lot though. Following my mini meltdown yesterday. I came back from the meeting with the estate agent yesterday and my wife said oh dear what have you said now! She knows me too well. I have typed out a polite and detailed letter for the seller. I have stated the price i had bargained for when we agreed a price did not include unforseen problems which were first highlighted in the epc report and later looked into and found to be very expensive problems. I took back my offer in the light of what i descibed as late information. Thought it best not to describe it as hidden information... Made out a list of these "extra problems" and detailed costings. I did not try and over exagerate any problems and all the costing are backed up by professional tradesmen. I did not include everything in the epc report. Just things i thought came as unexpected surprises. I did say i wanted a liitle extra added on to all the quotes to cover contingencies incase some of the problems are worse than anticipated. This could be the case with the electrics. To paraphrase i said if these late and unexpected costs came to x ammount i wanted that figure taken off my original offer. I would not be getting the house any cheaper as all the work outlined needed doing. We will see what happens.
  11. Dont care anymore if he did read this forum. My offer tomorrow will be non negotiable. Absolutely seething about the way this has been handled.
  12. If the deal falls through it will be ALL because i was not shown the epc which highlighted all the problems which later transpired. In my view hidden problems. So what you may ask? We are not yet in contract and any party can walk away. True, but the seller does so without any lose. We will be lsoing about £3000.
  13. Yes i agree the legalities are something about nothing even if i am proved right. However, if the deal fall through i will be happy to tell you why i am so upset about this. I went in today with the intention of forgetting about the legalities of the epc but it was the estate agent who brought it up and was handing over papers to me to show he was right and had done nothing wrong. I am going in tomorrow with a new offer based quotes for repairs i need to carry out. I will be detailing everything and will have quotes to back them up. No idea how things will pan out.
  14. At one stage the person from building control did seem to concede that i should be given the report but the relevant person obliged to do this was the seller. You would at least think building control would clearly know the law but the guy on the phone had to get the legislation from a file to look through it.
  15. The relevant person shall make available free of charge a valid energy performance certificate to any prospective buyer or tenant— (a) at the earliest opportunity; and (b in any event before entering into a contract to sell or rent out the building or, if sooner, whichever is the earlier of— (i) in the case of a person who requests information about the building, the time at which the relevant person first makes available any information in writing about the building to the person; or (ii) in the case of a person who makes a request to view the building, not later than the time at which the person views the building. (3) The relevant person shall ensure that a valid energy performance certificate has been given free of charge to the person who ultimately becomes the buyer or tenant. Any legal eagles out there. I went to the estate agent today to discuss the property but things got sidetracked when he was still made about my opnion from an earlier date that i believed the epc regulations had been broken when i was not provided with the report at the earliest opportunity. Things got so heated that he picked up the phone and contacted building control in belfast in order to prove he was right. He kept maintaining he only has to provide the epc report when asked. In the end the estate agent, myself and the man from building control were all debating the points of law over the phone. The estate agent put us all on conference call. At the start the man from building control said the estate agent acted properly as i did not ask for the report. However when i pressed the matter he was not so sure. As far as my reading of the legislation the legalities of handing over the epc on request is only one part. The paragraph making availabale the report to potential buyers at the earliest opportunity precludes the need for the purchaser to have to ask. Also it states clearly when a person views the building they should be given it then, agian without the need to ask. I was given a contact number in building control in order to get clarification. Any views on this strict point of law and the seeminglt non enforecement of this legislation.
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