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flyingsaucer

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Everything posted by flyingsaucer

  1. Great post. Classic divide and rule tactics by the media to set working people against each other through scaremongering and lazy stereotyping, to distract attention from the real villains. Sadly, it works.
  2. £3700 it costs me - but when you consider that a season ticket from an anonymous, over-priced zone 6 suburb costs two grand, that seems like decent value ( at least in the context of our shameful privatised rail system). Well worth the extra money to live in a fantastic city by the sea.
  3. Do you think most poor people enjoy living in poverty?? I'd suggest you actually talk to some. The vast majority are trying to make a decent life for themselves and their families but are trapped in a spiral of low wages and increasing living costs. Economic policy of all governments since the early 80s has created a huge gap between rich and poor, and that's the real crime.
  4. Please tell me where these departments with mobile pay scales are and I'll be there like a shot! There's certainly no mobility in any of the three or four big public sector employers me and my friends work for.
  5. Clearly another example of omniscient hpcers knowing far more about the public sector than those who work there. Care to tell me what they are, cos I'd love to know! My salary's gone up by a total of 1% since 2010 (in real terms down several per cent due to increased pensions contributions, and that's even before you take considerable inflation into account).
  6. The gravy train where whole swathes of civil servants earn around £18k pa? There are three main reasons why public sector salaries are slightly higher on average: All the very low paid public sector workers' roles, like cleaners, caterers and security, were privatised The remaining public sector workers tend to have more highly skilled and/or graduate roles. there's a much more equal salary distribution in the public sector. Fat cats get nothing like their private sector equivalents. If what you say is true, then why are regions with low proportions of public sector workers (home countie
  7. Yep, I must have just imagined that big increase in my PS pension contributions in April, the first of several planned over the next few years. Plus that indefinite pay freeze already several years old.
  8. Couldn't agree more. Many people's opinions of Brighton are informed by the tacky bit round the pier. Brilliant place to live and bring up children. So much better than the clone towns across most of the rest of SE England.
  9. Wouldn't describe it as bleak. Stoneham Park does feel like more of a London inner city feel than Hove Park for example, but the area itself is nice enough and has a great sense of community. I visited a friend there last week and was struck by the number of more upmarket shops on what used to be a pretty unremarkable stretch of Portland Rd. Maybe it's more surprising it didn't happen earlier given all the posh houses towards new church rd. Agree that those apartments are well overpriced. Plenty of better alternatives for that sort if money.
  10. Great idea - let's sack all teachers, hospital support staff, binmen, border control staff. Who'd miss them? Certainly not those constantly bemoaning fortnightly bin collections or supposed open borders.
  11. Good post. Scandinavian countries broadly manage it, don't know why we find it so difficult.
  12. Why would shops be closed or roads not 'tick over'? If my friends, I've seen at least five who wouldn't even have considered joining the union a couple if years ago walk out today. Don't underestimate how fed up modestly paid workers are at taking the hit for a crisis caused by others.
  13. Labour's great shame was continuing the deregulation that Thatcher started. Anyone who thinks the Tories would have done any better is deluded. They promised to match labour's spend pound for pound, and wanted to deregulate the banking and mortgage sector even further.
  14. That's simply not true. The TUC has been making that point for years now, but then again you're not likely to hear that as most of the media,would prefer to portray all union figures as illiterate oafs only interested in their own members. Don't forget that unions like Unite represent over a million private sector workers. Their pensions are generally better as a result, but unfortunately union rhetoric has limited influence over non-unionised companies.
  15. Exactly - retirement (and provision of salary to fund our lives) is that end. I'm not belittling the means itself, but it's the obession with profit for profit's sake that has got us into this mess.
  16. Public sector workers pay tax too - including to fund tax relief for private sector workers who do have pensions. It WAS wrong in 2003 too, and that's what the unions have been saying.
  17. For me success is less about companies making money than about having millions of people having secure retirements, regardless where they work. Profit's just a means to an end.
  18. Millions of people work for the likes of Tesco, BT, GSK, Kingfisher, BP Amoco etc. I take your point that things are more tricky for SMEs. But the government could still reduce NI contributions in return for greater pension pay-ins. Even if we accept that private sector pensions are beyond slavage (which I don't), that's still not a jusification for radically reducing public sector workers' pensions. Ultimately, the state will have to support people in retirement anyway, whether through helping them save initially or providing welfare in old age - it's a false ecomomy to reduce occupatio
  19. They could increase employers' mandatory contributions when automatic enrollment starts.next year for large companies who can afford it, for example. They could also stop using the fact that private sector workers have been shafted (while their bosses retire on HUGE pensions) as a justification for hammering state employees.
  20. 'almost gloating'? They're idiots then, and have fallen for the govt's divide and rule tactics as well.
  21. I don't think many public sector workers are revelling in the poor deal their private sector counterparts get. the unions have been vocal in calling for levelling up rather than reducing all workers to the lowest common denominator.
  22. Agree that there's a real public - private split, but that's a deliberate devide and rule government ploy which has worked a treat. Yes, public sector pensions are significantly better than in the private sector, but that wasn't always the case. Private sector employees have been shafted while boardroom pay has rocketed. And that's because there's been no unions to speak of to protect them. I think we should be looking to level up on pensions, rather than this race to the bottom where everyone loses out.
  23. Exactly. Britain already has among the most anti-union laws in Europe. The Tories' endless sniping on labour's union funding is also a joke - for all their faults, at least unions are democratic organisations representing millions of ordinary people, unlike the Tories' shady City funders looking after only themselves
  24. I don't know enough about retail I'm afraid to give you names, but I'm certain that there will be plenty of experienced and able execs who could do a good job for what is still an enormous salary. I think you've hit the nail on the head - there's now a bidding war among shareholders and boards who think that's the going rate, who think they're selling themselves short if they're not paying double or triple that. It's a self fulfilling prophecy.
  25. you've bought into the myth that there's a direct relationship between astronomical salaries and performance. There's no proven link at all - some interesting analysis in the guardian this week looking at various industry studies. If I was a shareholder, I'd rather pay a CEO £1m - more than enough for any high flyer to live on - and invest the other £2m in staff pay and rewards.
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