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House Price Crash Forum

Ronaldo McDonaldo

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About Ronaldo McDonaldo

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  1. A "buyers strike"? Isn't this the whole problem with modern society? If something's hard to get, there's no need to work for it, save for it, sacrifice for it! Simply cry and stamp your feet and what you want will be delivered to you on a plate. University? I'm not going there, you've got to do loads of work, but wait what's this? Uncle Tony's offering first class degrees at any university we want? All we have to do is go to a lecture every so often and we can spend the rest of the time getting drunk and increasing the population of the country with equally worthless individuals and then spend the rest of our lives on the dole. So you think a "buyers strike" (Che Guevara would be proud) is going to get you a house is it? Good luck with that, you just sit around while everyone else puts in the work, raises the money and, most importantly, takes the risk and gets themselves a house, gradually increasing prices. What a pathetic society we live in.
  2. I hope you sister ignored the letter. But tell her to keep the letter in case she gets home one day to find her house in ashes or wakes up one day and her tyres have been slashed, she'll be able to point the authorities in the right direction. Don't put it past people.
  3. If you get it Leasehold then you don't own the land, you have to pay rent on the land. Something like £3.50 every 10 years or something like that depending on the house.
  4. No thanks. I'd rather my money went to people who deserve it, no matter what country they're in. Cutting the "benefits" at home is the only answer. Being paid to sit around watching Jeremy Kyle all day? I'd rather my money went to earthquake survivors and I'm sure you feel the same.
  5. That's fine but what I want to know is how can you believe that taking on a mortgage over 25 years and owing money on that is any different to owing money in rent for that same amount of time. You're in debt either way unless you want to live on the street, but the many users of this website seem to think that only people who have a mortgage are in debt.
  6. What I just don't understand is that there are two options really. You either buy or rent (Ok you could live with your parents until you're 45 or get a council house, but assuming you have self respect buying or renting are the only options). So if you buy you end up in debt, but according to people on this website what does renting mean? OK you don't have a 25 year rental agreement but what do you think is the difference between renting and owning? You buy and end up in debt for 25 years or you rent for 25 years and pay rent for that same amount of time. You're pretty much in debt if you rent anyway because you have to live somewhere. I wouldn't mind an answer to this actually. At least by buying you own something at the end of it - which may only be 25 year - whereas renting is something you can do all your life and at the end of it have nothing to show for it.
  7. Increasing house prices mean that the ratio of debt-to-value-of-the-property falls. As mortgages are generally cheaper than the rates you would get if you were to borrow to get a new car it means that you can borrow against the house to buy that new car or holiday or business investment or...second home? Who knows what fun we can have, but everybody else has been there and done it and now I own a house I want my turn!
  8. Inevitably it'll happen about 5 minutes after you buy a house.
  9. Isn't the answer to this problem quite simple? I mean we've said that she should wait until house prices drop down so that the 15% deposit she has now automatically becomes 25%. Fair enough, that's what this website is all about. And we've also said that she should borrow the other money needed for the deposit. Surely the answer is pretty obvious: Look for a cheaper house? Maybe your 15% deposit would be worth a 25% deposit of a cheaper house? Does that not make sense to anybody else? Or am I going to get a lecture about how I didn't consider the fact that this person NEEDS a four bed house in Kent and how insensitive I am for discriminating against someone in someway.
  10. So what's the answer? They could stop the "most vulnerable people" from having bank accounts at all. Then again that would be against THEIR human rights or something. I think it's fine the way it is. Besides THEIR "benefits" come from somewhere don't they? Anyway where does this myth about these people subsidising free banking for the rest of us? We pay for our accounts by way of them taking a cut of the interest we receive. We all pay one way or another, it's just that some people pay more than others.
  11. So what's the problem with that then? The terms and conditions are there for all to read. If you don't want to pay unauthorised overdraft charges then don't go overdrawn without authorisation. Simple.
  12. ...or just sit at your PC copying and pasting links to websites that might indicate that the end truly is nigh, whilst crying into your keyboard because the world is just not fair. Oh wait, that's what seems to be happening already. Don't worry, I'm sure your Uncle Gordon will read this if you whinge long enough and all that you could ever want will be handed to you on a plate. Generation Y? How does that even work? The age bracket overlaps with that of Generation X so someone like me ends up being in both Generations. Although you won't catch me (touch wood) stacking shelves by day and sniveling at their computer by night whilst living with their parents. I just had to register to say that, sorry I couldn't resist.
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