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Bean counter

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  1. Per above post. It is quite possible law has changed recently as I haven't worked on a UK contract in last 18 months or so. It always used to be bog standard clause from when I graduated back in ..... Argh! Way too long ago!
  2. I can only speak for firms I have worked for or friends I know in Finance and Law. It's in your contract as pay, especially total compensation, is hugely confidential and sensitive as varies so much for what superficially seem similar levels of responsibility and expertise. I have always needed written permission to disclose pay when applying for a mortgage. My contract has always been very clear that the non disclosure of compensation does apply to immediate family and spouse. Quite what the sanctions would be if you did and got caught out I'm not quite clear on!
  3. In many professions it is in your contract of employment that you do not disclose your basic salary or total comp to anyone without prior permission. And this does apply to spouses and live in girlfriend / boyfriend.
  4. Gosh! Seemed to have re-ignighted this one with a woman's thoughts and views! Where do you draw the line? I'm an old-fashioned old git. I married my husband for better or for worse. Probably for worse with my luck??!! But seriously marriage is a very serious thing. It doesn't matter that large sections of society don't see it that way. Or does it?
  5. Because women, especially never married ones, still bear the overwhelming burden of childcare and earn a lot less money, even when they work. I have no vested interest in this; Mr Beancounter and I are legally married, I have my own money and we don't have children. But I do see from my previous (far, far less affluent life) that it can be very tough for women that don't have their own income and independence. We do not live in a world of equality.
  6. But how could one even prove (or indeed disprove!) a one off 'drunken bunk up'? As a feminist and someone interested in social justice I can totally see where Sir Wall is coming from. It is generally women (although not always) that lose out in co-habitation and generally those from the lowest socio-economic groups. They seem to be more likely to be in a co-habitation relationship and also have less independent earning power and resources. But, and it's a big but, as a libertarian I cannot justify the government imposing a sort of quasi 'marriage relationship' on people by default and without even the option to opt out.
  7. I'm confused as to how this could possibly be workable. How would it be determined as to whether the relationship was one of 'co-habitation' and when it began? Sir Nicholas Wall seems to refer to an 'intimate relationship'. Well by definition that is private for most people! Years before he became 'Mr' Beancounter, Mr Beancounter spent a year living in my house as a favour to a friend. It wasn't a formal tenancy but just sort of pay some bills and buy some food as you think reasonable. I had stayed with male and female friends on similar basis over the years. Would there be a possibility of a claim against property in each of these cases?! I assume it would have to apply equally to same sex relationships?
  8. Well it's certainly do-able but you will find it's all the stuff that's been hanging around on letting agents books. The well priced, attractive places go very quickly. Make sure you get a six month break clause, ideally a 'one month notice from five months' one. If you only have a short time to find somewhere you may end up with somewhere that is not ideal longer term.
  9. Absolutely agree. Maybe we have both been lucky? In our apartment everything is covered in little gas or electrical 'safety passed' signed and dated stickers as well as the safety certificates in the welcome pack. I do think the news article is perhaps somewhat generous in suggesting that some private, amateur LL are unaware of their legal obligations though; I suspect they are well aware of them (it's constantly in the press) and that they are either too tight or just can't be ar$ed to get all the appropriate checks undertaken.
  10. 'No time' as in 'very shortly from now' or as in 'at no foreseeable time'? ;-)
  11. I'm a little unclear on what the legal arrangement would be. It looks as if you buy the flat from her and as a previous poster states she then takes on the counterparty risk. But if she actually had the money to pay off the mortgage then why would she need to resort to such desperate measures? If she does have the money to clear the mortgage (and then effectively grant a mortgage to the buyer) then that is one hell of a risk she is taking on. Direct person to person lending is a new trend, Zoopla etc, but then your risk is spread over many borrowers so the default of one or two would not be a disaster. If she doesn't have the money to clear the mortgage then I'm sure her current lender would not accept such an arrangement. I suspect it may be some kind of stunt to attract attention but I'm not familiar with Australian lending practices so perhaps I'm wrong? Services charges? Not sure. It doesn't look like the sort of place that has gyms, porterage, gardens etc to push up the cost but these starter home type places usually have artificially low initial services charges (to help sell them new) that rise dramatically after a few years as there is nothing going into the sinking fund for repairs and replacements. I can never understand why people buy these starter homes anyway. Okay when we start out in our careers we all have to live in some pretty horrid places but to actually buy just seems too depressing. It locks you in for several years minimum without even the hope that you might progress up the slippery career pole earlier than you thought and hence off to live somewhere nicer!!
  12. btw the average rental price across all properties in that area may be around £288pw but most certainly not for a studio. http://www.rightmove...y-26882639.html Looks the same to me. And that is an optimistic asking rental. So you get to pay £8000 upfront plus legal fees and then can pay 'only' £288 pw plus service charges, maintenance etc. Or just pay £170 pw and save your money! It could only make any possible sense to buy if you were convinced that 'property only ever goes up', 'can't lose out with bricks and mortar', 'need to get on the ladder while you can'. Sigh. Do they actually still teach economics or even basic mathematics in our debased education system?
  13. http://www.docklands24.co.uk/content/docklands/news/story.aspx?brand=Docklands&category=news&tBrand=docklands&tCategory=znews&itemid=WeED06%20Apr%202010%2009%3A39%3A16%3A673 Perhaps reducing the price would be more effective than looking a prat walking around wearing a sandwich board? Even in London that's a lot of money for a studio room in a grim area.
  14. Just last week we had a heating engineer round (via the managing agent). It was a view on how we (as a society) used to be until very recently. The old guy was a grumpy old thing of sixty odd but who really knew his stuff. He was teaching his 16 year old trainee his job really well. He was like, 'The customer told you she heard this type of noise..'.What should that suggest to you? Is the problem the boiler etc?'. Skilled trades are something to be proud of, not something to be pushed to one side.
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