Jump to content
House Price Crash Forum

Dr fellgood

New Members
  • Content Count

    13
  • Joined

  • Last visited

About Dr fellgood

  • Rank
    HPC Newbie
  1. When i last went to a dentist- i paid for it. Reason- shortage of NHS dentists in my area and the fact i could get an appointment very quickly by paying. Most people pay for their eye check ups, thus limiting demand.
  2. If Tescos and the BMW garages were funded by taxation, and kept exactly the same managment and staff as they have now, what do you think would happen to the demand for their services? irrespective of how the place the run, it would be enevitable that demand for their services would increase and the cost to the taxpayer would rocket. Just imagine- you could pop into Tesco's and take what ever you like and not have to pay anything at the till. There may be someone people who only take what they need to feed themselves, but i assure you there are a lot pf people who would take what ever they could get their hands on -because 'they would be paying for it anyway through taxation'. Healthcare is no different from other essential services- arguably many other services that we pay directly at the point of delivery are much more important - gas,electricity, shelter, food and water. I can go a couple of years without seeing my GP with no problem but could not go with gas/electricity. Why shouldnt we pay for healthcare at the point of delivery?
  3. what absolute tosh! so you obviously havent insured a car, house or ever hired a car............ask yourself what is the purpose of the insurance excess whereby you pay the first amount of any claim in return for a lower premium? In the free market goods or services are not free at the point of demand- just imagine what would happen if they were! Going to tescos, local BMW show room etc................all free at the point of demand and paid through taxation?....................ridiculous!
  4. You are obviously very young or have a short memory- i remember in my life time mortgage interest rates of 17% - and you say rates of 9% could never happen! what happens when we need to control inflation after all that 'printy printy' (and possibly more to come). Take a look at historical bank of England rates an explain why a rate rise could not possibly happen? http://www.bankofengland.co.uk/monetarypolicy/decisions/decisions10.htm
  5. Thats just a reflection of supply and demand- i bet if everyone had to pay say £50 for a GP/casualty appointment (like an ''insurance excess''), demand would fall and you would get to see a doctor much more quickly! problem is because its free, many people see there GP/go to casualy when they dont really need to-with the enevitable result the truely sick/ill patients have to wait longer
  6. first off, NI is just another form of general taxation- not really specific to pay for healthcare but just another method to disguise the true level of income tax. Your figures seem a little suspect - if your paying £500 NI per month, then you must be earning approx 17-18k per month- hardly the average tax payer. http://www.hmrc.gov.uk/calcs/nice.htm You contribute much more than the average taxpayer, but thats the society we live in. Now on to healthcare, i dont feel the NHS is particularly inefficient, its just that healthcare is very expensive and the NHS is free at the point of delivery. If you have a system where the product or service is free at the point of delivery- demand will inevitably increase. I work in both the NHS and private practice and it is notable the the percentage of patients who actually have anything wrong with the is much greater in private practice. Its common sense i suppose- if you are gonna fork out £300 just to see me, you gonna make dam sure the consultation is really needed. In my NHS clinic- it is not uncommon for patients to come to clinic even if the original complaint has completely resolved. I've even had patient come to see me who forgot what there original symptoms were -'just for a check up!' I estimate about 95% of patients in my private practice have an organic illness wheras that figure drops to about 30-40% in the NHS. Therein lies the problem!
  7. you dont need to do many medicolegal report in the private sector to make 50k .........http://www.greenmedicolegal.com/fees.htm
  8. And they too earn a lot more in the private sector! ........................£300 per hour for a specialist consultant in a shortage speciality. Even the average is £200/hr for boring medicolegal stuff! http://www.greenmedicolegal.com/fees.htm
  9. If you take out a directors loan- thats all it is - a loan. You have to pay it back to your company. If you take it out with the express purpose of NOT paying it back, you are defrauding the inland revenue and will go to prison if you get caught.
  10. So you think educating your offspring , treating you when you are ill, ensuring the rule of law and the security of our country are not productive and those working in these sectors are simply 'leeching' of those who work in the private sector do you? And exactly what do you do in the provate sector which is so more 'productive' to society?
  11. i dont know...............i can imagine being a banker quite a nice private sector job- i mean you got job security, good pay and even bonuses are now back!
  12. I thought i join this debate............. I consider myself well paid for my job in the public sector with a good pension. I earn approx 93K per year and will have a pension of approx 50k a year by the time I reach 60. I’m also self employed doing much the same work as I do in public sector, but spending about 25% of the time (40 hrs public, 10 hrs private). I consider myself very well paid for the job I do and the hours I work. My profit after deductions are approx 90k year, of which I put 30k in a private pension. Each sector has its own advantages and disadvantages-all depends on what you do!
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.