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House Price Crash Forum

Nicnic

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About Nicnic

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    HPC Newbie
  1. Hi, I've been looking at funding circles such as http://www.thincats.com/. The fact that you can spread you money across several loans and due diligence is undertaken by a sponsor plus the loans are secured by a charge or personal guarantees does reduce the risk slightly, however, this is not the same as putting your money in a bank or building society and you don't have instant access to your funds. Has anyone else experience of this type of investment? Nic
  2. 1.Because the majority are scarred stiff of being alone. How many people leave their partner before finding someone else? Not many in my experience. And those who have been dumped make it a priority to find someone else as soon as they can; 2. They cannot afford to live on their own with rent and house prices at ridiculous levels; 3. They stay for the kids; I did for about 10 years and still think this was the right thing to do. There are many reasons and perhaps we expect too much because it is drummed into us that finding the perfect mate is the be all and end all. Then reality hits!
  3. Everyone is different awake eagle. I know there are 1000's of very lonely people out there and I wish I could make them less so. My ex mother in law lost her husband and misses having some one to look after, she is very lonely so we encourage her to go out and, hopefully, find someone else she can have a meaningful relationship with. Me, I don't want someone else. People may find this odd but I am happy and believe I will still be happy in 10 years time. I certainly don't want a partner just incase I have a chronic illness; how selfish is that? I would rather shoot myself!!
  4. In my experience many of the partners have an eye on you rather than you having an eye on them! They think, because you are alone, you are desperate!
  5. You are right and it makes me ashamed of being a woman when I witness wives taking their husbands to the cleaners and then going in search of 'the lifestyle', they believe they deserve by looking for a new partner with a bank balance rather than a personality! However, each case is different and there are a lot of women desperately trying to bring up their children on their own because their husband has walked out and refuse to maintain those children. Then, we the tax payer, end up paying.
  6. I have lived on my own for 3 years and absolutely adore it. If the right person came along I wouldn't mind them staying over occasionally but there is no way I would ever co-habitate again. I am not scarred and have not been put off men, I just don't want to live with one! Friends do worry about me and probably don't believe me when I say I am happier than I have ever been; but I am! I am totally independent and don't receive, and never have received a penny from my ex husband through choice and we remain great friends. I might become lonely in my old age but my son tells me he is going to send me on constant cruises to keep me out of mischief!
  7. There will be a vesting schedule. Options can vest on date of grant, monthly, annually or be tied to milestones etc. Once they vest they can be exercised but no one would normally exercise them unless the company is being sold and any gain between the option price and the price per share achieved in the sale can be realised. This is the beauty of employee options in the UK, the holder has no liability until they make some money and they have no obligation to exercise the option unless it is beneficial for them to do so. In some EU countries you have to pay a tax up front which is a bit of a bummer if you then leave the company or it goes under. The only time you would exercise before an exit is if the option is about to lapse. The lapse date will be in the option contract and can be no later than the 10th anniversary of the grant of the option under EMI rules. Nic
  8. There is not a lot you can do about dilution. Some option contracts have an anti dilution mechanism but not many. The company may also grant more options if it has a capital increase. If you want to work out what 'stake' she has in the company you need to find out what the fully diluted number is which is shares in issue + options + warrants. You then divide the 109 by this number and show as a percentage. As the fully diluted number increases your relatives 'stake' in the company will decrease unless she is granted more options. The number of issued shares can be found at Companies House but the number of warrants and options in issue is not shown on public record. There may also be loan capital which may cause further dilution in the future. I would just be happy to have the options. Something is better than nothing!
  9. Hi, This is not advice but my own understanding of EMI options. You can find a lot of information on the HMRC website. There is no reason why she should not sign this. She would not need to exercise until an exit and with an exercise price of £0.01 per share she will only pay £1.09. She will not own the shares until she exercises the options. The actual market value (AMV) is the value of the shares now. At an exit, hopefully, the price per share will be higher. There will be income tax and NICs to pay on the difference between the exercise price and AMV: 21.99 x 109 = 2,396.91 (this is the figure tax will be paid on). She may also be liable to pay the employers NICs; this should be stated in the option agreement. There will be capital gains tax to pay if the exit price is higher than the AMV but she will have her annual allowance to take advantage of. As I have said this is my own interpretation of the rules which are quite confusing. What I can definitely say is she should sign as there will be no liability until the point of exercise and with such a low exercise price she cannot lose. I would not even think about the value at this point, as it is irrelevant. She will be told how much each share is worth at the time of exit.
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