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penbat1

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About penbat1

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  1. penbat1

    Buying Hard Palladium

    you dont pay VAT with an etfs. I have recently bought a load of PHPD etfs http://www.etfsecurities.com/msl/etfs_physical_palladium.asp i dont think there are many palladium coins around although the US is due to issue some soon.
  2. A couple of years ago i used to look at a website, I think it may have been the hometrack website. It gave the monthly change for each individual town in the UK for different types of dwelling. You could also see a graph of changes over a period of years. Does anybody know where this information can be found. I cant find it on the hometrack website.
  3. penbat1

    Gerald Celente

    Celente has been running his world trends prediction service since 1980 so he has form. He is a gold bull like quite a few others such as Schiff, Chapman, Malone, Ron Paul, Turk, Faber and Keiser. There is even serious talk of $15,000 gold. There are quite a lot of independently minded gold bulls - but it is not an absolute certainty and it may be a very bumpy road.
  4. Joe Public = sheeple Scroungers = scapegoats Media = sycophants Bank chiefs = sociopaths There is a symbiotic relationship between these groups of people.
  5. Farm land and agricultural (aka soft) commodities in general should rocket - personally i have got a shedload of Baring Global Agriculture Fund. Also we may get El Nino this winter.
  6. The program explained that we are well and truely f*cked as we will be getting a perfect storm of peak oil, climate change, peak soil, water shortages, population increases and increased consumption of processed junk food. The whole concept of investing in property is an abomination as all the money poured into futile property investments should have gone into trying to secure resources for the world. We are doomed doomed doomed. Also having the credit crunch didnt do us any favours as if we didnt have enough problems already.
  7. It is most likely a significant factor behind explaining why the population of the UK has more than twice the European average incidence of mental health issues and personality disorders.
  8. penbat1

    Guernsey Mint

    Cant comment on Guernsey, but July and August are normally seasonal lows for gold prices as from the end of August, the Indian Gold jewellry buying festivals starts up in a big way and extend through to the new year. If ever buying gold, right now (August) is usually considered the best time of year. Most commentators are bullish on gold for both the short and long term but a minority of commentators are bearish. Silver has more potential growth than gold as the global economy recovers as it has industrial applications, but silver can be very volatile and while the chances of growth are very good short and long term, it isnt guaranteed.
  9. Ive got a shedload of Baring Global Agriculture fund which i had already chosen as a good long term play. But if El Nino happens, crop prices will spike soon and i could double my money in months.
  10. And the opportunities for parents to abuse their children are endless with 24/7 access to their children and the chances of conviction are very low as it is done behind closed doors.
  11. Parents "work" with children as well (their offspring) . So why exclude them.
  12. There are quite a few female paedophiles and nobody has a better opportunity to abuse children than the mother. only very few get convicted though. It makes a mockery of the scheme as most abuse is within the family unit.
  13. Oh really - try this for size http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2009/jul/1...nge-environment As well as droughts, floods and other extreme events, the next few years are also likely to be the hottest on record, scientists say.In the UK, a Met Office spokesman said yesterday that the El Niño event was likely to cause a hot, dry summer following a warm June, but said it could have other unpredictable effects on weather in Britain and north-west Europe. "Much depends on how much the El Niño deepens in the next few months." "The last major El Niño in 1998 killed more than 2,000 people and caused billions of dollars worth of damage to crops and infrastructure in Australia and Asia. It led to forest fires in south-east Asia, a collapse of fish stocks in South America and a drought threatening 700,000 people in Papua New Guinea. Strong El Niños often have long-lasting effects. The 1991-92 event led to droughts in Africa and food shortages that left 30 million people at risk of malnutrition and set back development for a decade." "
  14. You must have picked this up from my blog entry but i only put it up about a minute ago. Anyway i have loads piled into Baring Global Agriculture fund so i may personally be on a winner.
  15. penbat1

    El Nino

    http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/news/worl...icle6695339.ece El Niño, the warming of the Pacific Ocean that creates chaos in global weather patterns, is on its way back, threatening droughts, floods, crop failure and social unrest. According to scientists at America’s National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), a new bout of El Niño is under way as the surface of tropical waters across the eastern Pacific has warmed roughly 1C (1.8F) above normal and is still rising. Further down, some 150 meters (500ft) below the surface, the waters are heating up — by around 4C (7.2F). These indications have been emerging for about the past month from satellite pictures and an array of robotic buoys strung out across the Pacific. “The persistently warm sea temperatures are important indicators of an El Niño,†Mike Halpert, of NOAA’s Climate Prediction Centre, said. function slideshowPopUp(url) { pictureGalleryPopupPic(url); return false; } “We’re also seeing a link between the ocean and the atmosphere, with Indonesia tending to dry out as tropical rainfall shifts towards the international dateline in mid-Pacific.†The implications are severe, not just for climate but for the effects on food, water supplies and other commodities. Australia, still recovering from its worst drought in a century, will be hit again if the rains fail to nourish its wheat belt. Indonesia is one of the world’s biggest producers of palm oil — a basic source of income for many of its poor — and a drought would hit this commodity hard. Farming in India is already suffering from an abnormal monsoon, which scientists think could be related to the emerging El Niño. The rains arrived early but stalled. They picked up speed again only last week and covered the whole of the country, although rainfall is far lower than normal. There are fears that, if the rains do not improve, water shortages will kill crops and lead to soaring food prices. Shortages and food prices caused riots all over the world in 2008, from western Africa to Mexico, Uzbekistan, Haiti and Egypt, as well as consumer protests in Europe and panic in food-importing countries. Rice-producing nations were urged to stop hoarding supplies as stocks fell to their lowest levels for 30 years. The emerging El Niño is expected to continue strengthening over the next few months and reach a peak during the northern hemisphere’s winter. However, every bout of El Niño is different and much depends on the extent to which the Pacific warms up. At present forecasters say that it is too early to assess this El Niño — the NOAA’s meteorologists expect to have a clearer picture in September or October — but early signs suggest that it could become a moderate-to-strong episode. El Niños are still something of a mystery. They recur every few years and vary hugely in strength but no one entirely understands why. When a severe one does strike it unhinges weather patterns across the Pacific and beyond, leading to drought in some areas and heavy rains in others, such as the western coast of South America. In the last severe episode in 1997-98 torrential rains pulverised California, heatwaves swept across Australia and Brazil, forest fires blanketed Indonesia, eastern Africa was flooded while southern Africa withered under drought, and floods and storms caused billions of dollars’ damage to crops and buildings. That episode was so strong that it helped to break the record for the world’s highest average temperature for the year, which has not been broken since. The turmoil in the global climate caused havoc with food prices as staple crops such as wheat, rice and sugar were hit hard. There are, however, some benefits to El Niño, especially in the US. It tends to kill off hurricanes in the Atlantic, bring welcome rainfall to the arid southwest, a milder winter across the north, and a reduced risk of wildfires in Florida. Sometimes El Niño — Spanish for “little boyâ€, a reference to Jesus as its effects were said to be most pronounced around Christmas — has even helped to change history. About 1,500 years ago the Moche civilisation of Peru suffered severe El Niño spells that are thought to have led to its downfall. A severe El Niño in 1787-88 may have set off the atrocious weather in France that led to crop failures, soaring food prices and ultimately the French Revolution. In 1520 El Niño is thought to have given the explorer Ferdinand Magellan unusually plain sailing over calm Pacific seas as he sailed from South America to the Philippines, where he was killed in a battle with natives. There is even a positive aspect for Australians: a recent study has linked El Niño to increased chance of an Australia-in-Australia Ashes victory. Records from 1882 to 2007 show that the tendency for dry wickets in El Niño years favours their fast bowlers.
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