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jocohen

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About jocohen

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    HPC Regular
  1. jocohen

    Question Time

    Douglas Murray is just an intellectual charlatan, he devoid of any ability or cohesive or logical argument, its a real shame that he seems to be the poster boy for various conservative groups at the moment because he's quite clearly out of his depth. there are so many able speakers out there who can develop a rational argument but he's not one of them, his nick name is an apt one ..'nasty but dim'!
  2. I think this is so true, there are far too many poorly paid people who are effectively subsidising very comfy lifestyles for professionals in 'protected 'jobs. I feel so sorry for companies who have to fork out for maternity and paternity pay. Its a great thought but when it means that doctors and lawyers can take time off for their family life it is at a cost. in those cases to the NHS or a big company, but try getting the same rights for low paid low skilled people who are in short term contract jobs or in small companies who could never ever afford such luxuries. Obviously maternity/paternity is an emotional issue and I repeat its a lovely idea. but there must be one that is genuinely fair and affordable. Also take into account there are dozens of little benefits and perks such as this and then you really realise who supports who in this nation
  3. jocohen

    My Pragmatic Spending Review

    I like the idea of being pragmatic but there are some obvious problems. for example imposing very reasonable pay restrictions on high paid government workers such as hospital consultants and nurse managers; but i think the problem is of contracts. even if 99% of staff within an indiustry agreed you'd only need one to object and the legal costs would be tremendous. Same with the 'bankster' even though they have robbed us blind are so footloose they can move their business to the middle east and far east within days. banks have been an evil influence for 300 yrs but now they are biting their own home nations. i don't think we can actually get at them. the reality is that there are very few re\ally'poor' people in this country and so many of our problems is the 'dependency'culture and at least osbourne is attempting to confront this although the proof will be in the results rather then words
  4. What LAWS!! american sponsered 'laws' for their own business and political interests. If europe and uk had any balls we should tell the americans to go and FO. We need to stop pandering to narrow US interests which involve hampering ourselves. Look at the US political vitriole directed at BP, if it was just about alleged poor practices it would be fine. But the real aim was they want to take hold of BP's commerical interest in Libya, where US companies have no hold. Similarly there are huge financial prizes in Iran and Sudan where the chinese are making hay. Who's missing out, we are. How many contracts did brits win in Iraq..very few if any... Its all about economic interest, we should starting looking after our own now our oil is all but finished.
  5. jocohen

    Man Down! Man Down!

    To be fair wasn't the money wasted as soon as it was given to you. After all Uk and 'cutting edge medical research' is a bit of an oxymoron. We are now 2nd maybe 3rd rate in terms of medical research. So shouldn't be accept that and stop wasting money on the scientists who are having a nice holiday with our tax and various charity monies
  6. the alliance of the greedy undeserving super rich and the equally undeserving scrounger poor. Only leaves the hard working, cautious careful middle classes to stomp up for the excesses of one and the neediness of the other
  7. jocohen

    Jp Morgan Uk Future At Risk

    How honest london is is irrelevant. All powerful cities could have been describes as moral vacuums. The cotton mills of the north made effective slaves of the rural populus that moved into the cities. Have any of those northern cities ever really recovered when the trade disappeared..no..they are cities dependent of handouts from london. London probably has what it takes to adapt but there are no guarantees. its the catch, justice dictates we would like to see the bankers 'get it' , but there is no point destroying ourselves in the process.
  8. jocohen

    Jp Morgan Uk Future At Risk

    haven't you noticed for all the fine words both Paris and frankfurt are bending over backwards ( and forwards) to get these banks to relocate. Sure they introduced anti hedge funds rules which are virtually all based in london. Did they touch any of the other major regulations, not even started discussing them. Sure tweaking of a few Basel rules but nothing substantial. The only bank that has grown over the last 10 years ws RBS but look where they went. Of course new banks may come but what seems to happen is when a division of a bank do a particular job very well, the people in the division don't leave to form a new bank. They form small single function companies often to cream off money in a very small niche field. Ultimately leaving those banks which were in power in the late 80's post deregulation are pretty much as they were. Of course if we had let them go bust what you say would happen new dynamic companies may have been started. But there will be no chance after lehman of that happening, far too many vested interests!
  9. jocohen

    Jp Morgan Uk Future At Risk

    The difficult thing to understand is that they do have access and control over a huge amount of business, eg mergers and acqs; ipo's; risk ; etc etc So if they are not based here the business may not necessarily go to another bank in the UK. Whatever contract work they do can be done from any office in the world. London alongside new york is the favourite place for financial types to work and live, maybe even more favoured then new york. So head offices and building do make a difference. JP morgan may do the work in another office anywhere in the world. That is why these institutions have so much power, they can take their business elsewhere. There are always substantial contracts which governments need doing, and its always the same banks that do it. Be it goldman or jp morgan or UBS they all want preferential treatment. And watch they will get it. But that is the catch 22 we are in we all need them, for their core work,sure their speculative work and bonuses has destroyed the western world economy but until world wide rules are made and enforced we can do nothing but sit back and watch as the bonuses restart. The danger which Europe is still not facing up to is that it is us in europe most at risk from this crash no the US. it is financial centres in mid east and far east taking business now, add to that India becoming more competitive only adds to our potential woes. whereas european politicians want to delude themseves that european standards of living are not about to fall.
  10. jocohen

    £26M House Knocked Out For £16M

    finally gibson is getting away from the gold diggers, there is a man who should be giving up the drink..OZ should be just right...
  11. jocohen

    Jp Morgan Uk Future At Risk

    If only that were true, the financial sector has its boot to our throat. Even after the huge and repeated bailouts, we are as dependent on them as we were before. The term bankster is just so appropriate except that most of what they do is legal even if its morally bankrupt. The only advantage of the crash is that the average man in the street has realised the power of banking, so those lonely academics who have been shouting about this fo decades at least have an audience. The question is will we remember and will we actually hold our political 'masters' to account. In reality we need the american populus to do something as without their involvement anything we do will be counter productive. Until we realise that the core functions of banking and finance are a utility we will continue to buy into this banking con which has been destroying lives over the last 250 years
  12. jocohen

    The Cuts Will Save Us All

    I'm sure some people who are cut are actually needed. But in industries I have seen: the NHS; the quangos there are thousands who do not justify their salaries. Often they may be hospital consultants who have a nice niche and may be well qualified but are paid full time for onto 18-20 hours of work a week. Or quangos whose purpose it is is just to exist and take money from governments. The problem is that the people who will lose their jobs first will be cleaners and maintenance staff who are needed. Noone has the guts to go after senior high paid people because of pure laziness Until we recognise the damage ideology has done and may do in the future we will continue to go from one extreme to another
  13. jocohen

    Graduate Tax

    Unfortunately the problem lies with labour's policies. It was their destruction of gcse and a level exam which has made them meaningless. It was the expansion of pointless university courses and people being sold a false dream. To add to our troubles the once great british university system has been eroded down. Its a great shame that this tax will have to come in. But we're the ones to blame when we believed the labour party and its agenda for social engineering and if be bought into their unfunded dreams.
  14. its the sensible choice. families need to act as families, my daughter and son in law have been back with us as they have realised that they can save alot by rationalising heir costs. its not great for parties to admit to, but when they can afford their own place with their own money then they will be far happier
  15. jocohen

    Universities Superannuation Scheme

    the problem was that however well meaning so many of these social engineering projects were ..eg protecting women pension rights for unworked years, allowing pension plans to pass on to spouses and a whole raft of similar policies; they were all uncosted. So when we're looking at worthless pension plans we know we were all to blame when we failed to ask questions of the huge social engineering experiment over the last 13 years
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