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Confusion of VIs

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Posts posted by Confusion of VIs

  1. 19 minutes ago, Cocha said:

    I think this is what hurts them the most. Some of them actually enjoyed looking down their noses and sneering, rather than engaging, but in the end that is what has cost them. Like Cameron before the referendum, they were far to complacent. 

    Now they are struggling to deal with the fact that those they loved to see as losers and beneath them, have beaten them. No wonder their teddies are still flying all over the place!

    The areas of the country hardest hit by Brexit seem to have been those where the Leave vote was highest. The area least affected and recovering quickest being London and the worst being the "red wall" and industrial areas in the NE.

    Brexit: The UK area that will see the biggest drop in wages (aol.co.uk)

    Is this what the winners voted for.

     

  2. 1 hour ago, yelims said:

    I’ll believe it when I see it

    quite a lot of tech at moment offering solution to the storage problem is vapourware, until it’s not prices are tied to gas costs and standing charges are tied to costs of building grids to remote locations 

    We are still in the development phase, full scale Commercialisation won't happen until the rate of progress slows down and one or two winners emerge. No point in investing a couple of billion in today's best tech when there is a good chance it will be rendered obsolete by the time you have built it. 

    The same issue is affecting wind turbines, firms are still leapfrogging each other with every new model they produce. To really ramp up they need to agree on a standard size so that the infrastructure for mass production of offshore turbines can be built. A year or two ago it looked like 14MW might be it but now it looks like the race is on for 20MW. 

     

      

  3. 54 minutes ago, slawek said:

    I am a simple man. I believe that honesty wins long term. Call me naive if you want.

    Starmer makes many other false claims not only that Brexit can be better. He is manipulative, resorting to lies and not keeping his promises.  Definitely not a honest guy, probably still better than BJ but not by much. 

    Starmer is simply accepting the reality that the UK will not be re-joining the EU any time soon, if ever.

    I still speak to people I used to work with in the Commission and they say there is no chance that the UK would be accepted back by all 27 states. One or two are pretty ambivalent about wanting the UK back at all and several more think the risk of a second Brexit would be too high. 

    Maybe in 10-15yrs and after we have adopted a proportional voting system it might be worth revisiting but until them fixing Boris's botched Brexit is the only sensible policy for Labour.    

  4. 7 minutes ago, Timm said:

    https://polarnightenergy.fi/technology#:~:text=We Use Really%2C Really Hot Sand as The Storage Medium&text=Additionally%2C sand is a cheap,to and from the storage.

    We convert electricity to heat, and store it for later use. We use sand as the storage medium, which leads to safe operation and a natural balance in the storage cycle. Additionally, sand is a cheap and abundant material, which can be heated up to 1000 °C and even higher.

    Inside the sand we build our heat transfer system that enables effective energy transportation to and from the storage. Proper insulation between the storage and environment ensures long storing period, up to months, with minimal heat losses.

    The size of our storages varies from tens to thousands of cubic meters. It is possible to locate the storage underground, reserving minimal space from the often highly valued square meters in construction sites.

    It can be said that the heat taken from our storage is as clean as was the electricity fed into the storage.

    Yelims knowledge of renewables is very outdated, little more than parroting the information produced by the fossil fuel industries paid lobbyists. 

    There are a large number of competing technologies that will reduce grid scale storage costs by far more than needed to make renewables plus storage competitive with fossil fuels. It's too early to say which will win out but we are not short of options.  

    In the UK Renewables are now helping to offset increases to energy bills and save consumers money.

  5. 58 minutes ago, yelims said:

    Renewables 

    more wind and solar means more grid infrastructure to often remote places and more gas plants having to idle on standby as backup as there is no cheap storage solutions (batteries need 10x cost reduction and hydro storage is expensive and destroys mountains and valleys)

    Gas and electricity prices in the UK are set according to the European/World market gas prices. The fact that most of our gas comes from domestic production makes no difference. 

     

  6. 9 hours ago, henry the king said:

    Totally agree. 

    And petrol is £2 a litre and Boris does nothing. But he will send billions to Ukraine in a war they are certain to lose anyway

    Who cares about the price of petrol, the higher it goes the sooner we will end dependence on the likes of Russia. 

    Given that we signed a treaty guaranteeing Ukraine's sovereignty and territorial integrity shouldn't we be doing enough to ensure they don't lose. 

    9 hours ago, henry the king said:

    Why are we defending places like Estonia too though? What benefit is there to us? The EU shafts us at every opportunity anyway. We should withdraw all military support from europe and use the money to cut tax and build up our UK defences.

    What money? The UK's defence forces rely on allies to be able to operate. On our own we don't have enough escorts for our aircraft carriers, anti submarine planes/ships to allow our submarines to leave port without being tracked, etc etc.

    Turning back the clock to the days when the UK could operate independently would cost enough to make whatever we give to Ukraine seem like lose change. 

    6 hours ago, henry the king said:

    Mail readers hate getting involved in Ukraine. 

    The same readers who thought it was a good idea to leave the EU at a cost of +£100bn a year.   

  7. 3 minutes ago, BaldED said:

    I was shocked at the price of instant coffee. £6+ for a jar when a year ago it was about £3-4. Ironically coffee beans (which i drink cos im posh) have stayed the same price. Presumably because instant is guzzled by the majority of people and it cost energy to make it.

    That's marketing, coffee is not really £6+ a jar. Most people now buy it when it is on offer at half price. 

  8. 9 hours ago, scottbeard said:

    Your view on inflation is shared by some senior analysts at my firm (although not by the market at large at this point).

    I would dispute that "a massive crisis is coming" though since if you are right the whole point of the delay is to avert one.

    If interest rates went up to 12% tomorrow yes, that would cause a massive crisis.

    If they rise 1% a year for 12 years, not so much.

    I doubt interest rates will rise much beyond 2%.  

    Rising energy prices will take £50bn out of disposable household income in the next year, in a weakening economy that itself will do the job of demand destruction.   

  9. 2 hours ago, micawber said:

    You changed the outcome of the 2010 election so I don't buy the BS about your votes being worthless.

    I voted for LD last time out. Should I just give up and have a temper tantrum because they won't form the government?

    But please answer the question that I asked you. Is the win more important than reduced division? We have all seen the result of close votes and the cancer they cause. 

    History seems to indicate that successful independence votes seem to heal rather than exacerbate divisions. 5yrs on people seem to accept it as the natural state of affairs. 

    Obvious exception would be Brexit but there leavers were voting for something they already had so not surprising the results have been somewhat underwhelming.

     

  10. 5 minutes ago, bomberbrown said:

    Slightly off topic, but I’m curious. With £1BN going to Ukraine, will that have a deflationary effect, all be it very small in context, on UK economy?

    I doubt there is £1bn going to Ukraine.

    From what I have heard much of what we are sending is missiles at or approaching their use by date and equipment currently in storage because we haven't the troops to use it.

     

  11. On 29/06/2022 at 13:45, kzb said:

    Do you recall what happened to the Catalan government after they called that referendum?  Is that chap still on the run or did they arrest him?  I can't remember now.

    That's how they deal with ad-hoc referendums in the EU.  Which you are very keen to join.

    Under Spanish law nothing to do with the EU. 

    On 29/06/2022 at 13:45, kzb said:

    Plus we are still waiting for the legal procedure.  As I said, there is no exit clause to the treaty and it was established beyond doubt that referenda are only advisory.   The Westminster parliament would have to vote to enact the dissolution of the union.

    There are two types of referendum under UK law binding and advisory. The EU referendum was advisory not binding. Why are you having such problems understanding this simple fact.

    Presumably the Scots would want a binding referendum.    

  12. 7 hours ago, spyguy said:

    Lie, exceptionally incurious about the potential numbers, not really paying attention to what they are seeing.

    Hardly the centre of journalist excellency.

     

    Pre 16 nobody bothered much about counting. 

    IIRC back then the HO guessed the real number was around 4m. 

    Now the number is an overestimate because no account is taken of people who decide to leave. 

     

     

  13. 8 hours ago, spyguy said:

    An ex colleague who still works in the Home Office told me last year that the stats are a mess, including many hundreds of thousands of duplicate applications and a million plus from people who have already left the UK.

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