Jump to content
House Price Crash Forum

Dave Ja Vu

New Members
  • Content Count

    26
  • Joined

  • Last visited

About Dave Ja Vu

  • Rank
    HPC Newbie
  1. Last thing is about overcentralisation around London - and wealth gap, does that have a significant impact on house price inflation. other than that, you seem to be saying that I'm mostly ok with the summaries I'm making. Taihen doumo arigatou gozaimasu ZZQ113-san! "may your bed be graced by a thousand lotus-skinned japanese undergraduate girls"
  2. No, I won't get off my high horse, it's very comfortable up here (No I'm not a Dr Who fan, I can't take looking at that rubber-faced stage-school troll "Billie") I'm sick of giving air time to people who write like they need the toilet Listening to and debating with idiots, makes you an idiot - look, it's happening already! No, don't bother, this thread is not about "Hidden Inflationary Processes" any more than it's about intergalatic timeshifting pop-gnomes. Please delete your post, and start your own thread about your topic of interest, don't fill up mine with off-topic garbage. I
  3. "justanewbie" I asked for input from knowledgable people. I'm yet to be convinced that you fall into that category. Likewise, "zorn", your post is not relevent to the subject of this thread. Please delete your own posts. Thanks.
  4. I'm just trying to establish cause and effect of the main and fundamental causes of increased demand for housing in very simplistic terms. I'm breaking it down into: ------------cause------------- 80s council housing sell-off ------------effect------------- lack of social housing; debt culture & commodification of housing; ------------cause------------- globalisation (Chinese imports) ------------effect------------- low inflation; low interest rates; ------------cause------------- pension crises, 80s council house sell-off (commodification of housing); aging ----------
  5. Thanks again. I need to get this in my head in simple approximate terms, as I've got to translate it into Japanese for a presentation tomorrow. So we have Pensions Crises + House Buying culture? [is house-buying culture mainly a result of the Thatcher 80s council house sell-off?] So, back to low interest rates -> low inflation -> globalisation? Services are made more expensive by low interest rates because of the price of assets going up? Inflation is the cause, Low Interest Rates is the effect? high personal debt -> (caused by) low interest rates -> (caused by) low
  6. Thanks for taking the time to do that, I really appreciate it. I just want to clarify and put it in simple terms (as I'm not an economics graduate). Is it true then to say in simple terms that: (1.) BTL increase is mainly due to general lack of confidence in the pensions industry. (2.) Inflation is low because of globalisation: mainly due to Chinese imports and competition (overcapacity). [Please can you explain the inflation in asset prices?] (3.) Interest rates are low because inflation is low - see (2).. [shouldn't it be the other way round?] (4.) High personal debt is due to (low i
  7. Can anyone (knowledgable) help answer these questions please? 1. What's the main reason for the upsurge in BTL? Is it the pensions company crisis and middle-aged people moving their funds into housing? 2. Is inflation low because of globalisation? Inflation is either a response to increase cost or increased demand - if demand (i.e. consumer spending) has remained high, then has the cost fallen due to importing developing world goods (China) and services (India)? Oil prices are going up; how is it they're not filtering down to consumers? 3. Why are interest rates low? Is it somehow connected
  8. I don't think implying Brainclamp is a racist is either big or clever. He's brought up some interesting stats and graphs that in my opinion are misconstrued - i.e. that he's confused "in-migrants" with "immigration: migrant workers, informal workers: including asylum seekers", when in fact 80% net "in-migrants" could be regarded as foreign students (and only a minority as bogus ones) at universities across the country. That still leaves about 30,000 excess immigrants, plus an uncertain number of informal unrecorded individuals. There's also the issue of what group of immigrants we're talkin
  9. read my lips - brainclamp's "immigration" is not what it seems
  10. It's an interesing idea, but I think this is simplistic; and the BNP would love stats like this (which does not mean I think you are racist by the way). Yes you do have phenomena like Asian "student-lets mini-tycoons" in places like Leeds, but surely the bulk of immigrants, as with the native population, are lower earners and more to the point less likely to live in single households for cultural reasons. You talk about migrant workers without talking about what sectors or pay levels, and how permanent they are. You may have a nice graph, but in my gut, i just don't buy it. I've seen ONS i
  11. Having read the FAQ on why house prices have risen in the UK, I'm left with a couple of questions... 1. Can the factors be listed in order of importance/impact? 2. Prices are reported to be rising globally - and not just in developed countries... is something missing from the list of factors applied to the UK? This very recent article: http://www.rediff.com/money/2005/jun/18guest1.htm says house prices in South Africa are up 35%, even India has boomed (yes they must be talking about the affluent bits, but)... could Globalisation be playing a role in this that makes this boom different to
  12. Clearly I was referring to the state, not the individual citizens. "debt mountain" is very emotive, how much debt did we have before it became a mountain? (ie pre 80s) What do the French have, a hillock? It's not like debt's new or innately evil, just more than you can handle is bad, non?
  13. http://www.15seconds.com/issue/981025.htm It'd be nice if you could convert these into gifs, i can't open them at the moment
  14. Home Front, BBC 2 - the Andy Pandy of house programmes in comparison to today's Teenage Mutant Ninja Hairdressers
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.