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SarahBell

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Posts posted by SarahBell

  1. 15 minutes ago, Frugal Git said:

    Instead of being angry, look at it from their perspective. 

    They are acting rationally. They lose 73p+ in the £ for every actual earned pound. 

    In effect, at minimum wage they’d be taking home about about £2 p/h per extra hour earned because of the taper rate. So why wouldn’t they say sod it?

    you could say things like pride, self respect etc. Easy to say, but given how screwed they are regardless in terms of housing etc, you can hardly blame them. Not to mention pride and self respect means valuing your time too. And £2 or £8 p/h are both utter sh1t. 

    The sensible option is to lower benefits the longer you are on them. They are a safety net not a forever gift.

  2. 3 hours ago, Mikhail Liebenstein said:

    Maskies read and weep:

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-9914969/Popular-blue-surgical-face-masks-NOT-stop-people-infected-COVID-19.html

    "Cloth surgical masks only 10% effective" - which in my book is as good as zero percent over time

    Apparently even N95 spec masks are only 50% effective. Which long term is also as good as nothing - they are also impossible to breath in if doing anything needing mild exertion.

    Of course the researchers can't use the same language as a tabloid, so they have to call for better masks to stick to the orthodoxy. That is of couse like finding unicorns. As an engineer i can make a 100% effective mask, it's just you'll either suffocate or have to carry pumping equipment / oxygen around.

    https://uwaterloo.ca/news/media/study-supports-widespread-use-better-masks-curb-covid-19

     

     

     

     

     

    But they do allow you to mouth swear words at people and not be seen doing so.

     

  3. https://www.taxinsider.co.uk/1675-Buy_To_Let_Property_Too_Costly_To_Sell.html
     

    In this scenario, Philip faces a dilemma. If he sells that one property now, he will be roughly £32,000 out of pocket – although he will save himself £1,600 a year of increased tax cost, indefinitely. But if he can afford to suffer the additional tax cost of finance, and he believes that the property will ultimately claw back the value lost in the last few years, then he could be better off biding his time

     

  4. On 24/03/2017 at 8:13 AM, AvoidDebt said:

    The Wrekin Landlords Association says Telford and Wrekin council’s scheme to licence private landlords in seven locations - at £160 a time - will raise £1.2m for the authority but will ultimately be paid by tenants because rents will have to increase as a result.

    •  


    What it will ultimately create is more pensions to be funded. 
    Employing council staff to manage private rentals isn't a sensible idea. (Manage they will, to fill plenty of officer hours)

    What councils need is more environmental enforcement officers trained to deal with substandard housing.
    And to enforce action against bad landlords.

    The initial scheme in Manchester's Moston and Lightbowne folded. FOI would reveal the scale of damage to council tax payers and the huge waste of time it was.

    If you want landlords to improve properties, then ensure there ar systems to force them - and there currently are - but by EH not a new branch of the council.
    And if you want neighbour nuisance dealt with then you need to actually learn how to change people.
    Councils just evict bad tenants. Do they expect more from private landlords?

  5. Based on the information entered this Buy to Let property appears to be self-financing.
    The maximum we could lend on a self-financing basis is £82,500

    • This amount is subject to a satisfactory valuation.
    • View our Buy to Let eligibility criteria for information on minimum income, secured credit commitments, maximum number of Buy to Let properties and our valuation policy.
    • We may require supporting evidence to help us assess the plausibility of the monthly running costs.
    • You can save a copy of these results for your records and to help you submit the application on Introducer Internet.

    Summary

    Date

    18 March 2017

    Property value

    £110,000

    Mortgage required

    £60,000

    Repayment method

    Repayment

    Term

    25 years

    Gross monthly rent

    £550

    Please input the following figures on Introducer Internet


    AIP > Loan Required > Loan Details

    Loan details
    Mortgage required £60,000
    Purchase price/valuation £110,000
    Annual rental income 
    in respect to this property
    £6,600

    FMA > Loan required > BTL details

    BTL property self-financing assessment
    Gross monthly rent £550
    Monthly mortgage payment £369
    Monthly agent's fees (if applicable) £0
    Monthly allowance for rental voids £0
    Monthly property maintenance (see help text) £10
    Other monthly costs (see help text) £0
    Other monthly commitments to be paid from rent £0
    Surplus /(deficit) £171

    Any additional information

    For all applications we will assess the plausibility of these costs. Please provide as much information as possible here to explain the amounts entered as this will help us underwrite your case quicker.

  6. Based on the information entered this Buy to Let property appears to be self-financing.
    The maximum we could lend on a self-financing basis is £82,500

    • This amount is subject to a satisfactory valuation.
    • View our Buy to Let eligibility criteria for information on minimum income, secured credit commitments, maximum number of Buy to Let properties and our valuation policy.
    • We may require supporting evidence to help us assess the plausibility of the monthly running costs.
    • You can save a copy of these results for your records and to help you submit the application on Introducer Internet.

    Summary

    Date

    18 March 2017

    Property value

    £110,000

    Mortgage required

    £60,000

    Repayment method

    Repayment

    Term

    25 years

    Gross monthly rent

    £550

    Please input the following figures on Introducer Internet


    AIP > Loan Required > Loan Details

    Loan details
    Mortgage required £60,000
    Purchase price/valuation £110,000
    Annual rental income 
    in respect to this property
    £6,600

    FMA > Loan required > BTL details

    BTL property self-financing assessment
    Gross monthly rent £550
    Monthly mortgage payment £369
    Monthly agent's fees (if applicable) £0
    Monthly allowance for rental voids £0
    Monthly property maintenance (see help text) £10
    Other monthly costs (see help text) £0
    Other monthly commitments to be paid from rent £0
    Surplus /(deficit) £171

    Any additional information

    For all applications we will assess the plausibility of these costs. Please provide as much information as possible here to explain the amounts entered as this will help us underwrite your case quicker.

  7. 4 hours ago, stormymonday_2011 said:

    I dont suppose that would be too hard for a government to reflect that fact in its pension calculations

    It is being done already for employees who paid Contracted Out NIC upto 2016 when it was finally abolished,  Many are getting a lower state pension as a result with many receiving sums closer to the old state pension rate of £119 rather than the new flat rate state pension of £155. Some cant make up the shortfall even by working longer or making voluntary contributions because they simply dont have enough qualifying years to retirement

    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/pensions-retirement/financial-planning/face-a-smaller-state-pension-because-you-were-contracted-out-her/

    When the new state pension came in all formerly contracted out employees were contacted back into the state system at the full NIC rate of 12%. This left the self employed as the only group who could qualify for the new State pension by paying lower rate NIC than everyone else.The Budget change was an attempt to remove the anomaly, As that has been blocked my suspicion is that the government will simply claw the money back by changing the State Pension rules so that the self employed will find their contributions no longer buy a full year in the new state pension. My back of a fag packet calculation suggests that if they were paid nearer the old state pension than the new one then they would be £36 a week worse off on retirement or £1872 per year.  This would actually be a huge win for the Treasury so dont be surprised if this idea is floated for the November Budget perhaps with the sop of allowing the self employed to pay additional Voluntary NIC to qualify for the full pension.

     

    This is the only logical conclusion.

  8. On 16/03/2017 at 11:49 PM, wonderpup said:

    This gives rise to a Zen like paradox; If a man on a zero hours contract is offered no work he is both employed and unemployed at the same time. Which makes his status as a claiment of jobseekers allowance an almost philisophical question that may well lie beyond the intellectual capacities of his job coach.

     

     

    But in theory this is what UC is for. To instantly fill in the lulls in ZHC.

  9. 11 minutes ago, Snugglybear said:

    An article on the web says "The idea of a ‘Right to Buy’ for council house tenants originated after 1945 as part of the Conservative attempt to build a ‘property-owning democracy’; however, it was deemed inappropriate and of doubtful political value by party elites until Conservative councils enacted profitable local sales schemes during the late 1960s."

    I'm presuming that Oxford Council was predominantly Conservative in the early 1970s.

    oldham sold houses in the early 70s too.

    and that is as red as red can be.

  10. On 08/03/2017 at 11:48 PM, CunningPlan said:

    No one seems to be discussing T Levels. On face value this seems to be a good plan. Makes a straight choice after gcse of Academic level or Technical level. I think the alternatives have been confusing to kids and employers for years and this may well help people make a better choice. Or maybe I am just out of touch?

    Something on news this morning about cutting the number of subjects at A level (and GSCE?) 
    includes Design technology and German.
     

  11. 3 hours ago, hotairmail said:

    They would get it half done by imposing stringent requirements on homes to let - without any subsidy.

    Then give a generous subsidy to homeowners to help them insulate their homes.

     

    Knowing our governments of whichever hue, it will probably end up being the other way round.

    They have sort of. You can't let a property with an EPC less than E 

    https://www.rla.org.uk/landlord/guides/minimum-energy-efficiency-standards.shtml

    As from the 1st April 2018 there will be a requirement for any properties rented out in the private rented sector to normally have a minimum energy performance rating of E on an Energy Performance Certificate (EPC). The regulations will come into force for new lets and renewals of tenancies with effect from 1st April 2018 and for all existing tenancies on 1st April 2020. It will be unlawful to rent a property which breaches the requirement for a minimum E rating, unless there is an applicable exemption. A civil penalty of up to £4,000 will be imposed for breaches. This guidance summarises the regulations. There are separate regulations effective from 1st April 2016 under which a tenant can apply for consent to carry out energy efficiency improvements in privately rented properties.

  12. https://skwawkbox.org/2017/02/26/exclusive-electoral-expert-copeland-by-election-unlawful-count-suspect/
     

    The key matter in the preliminary instance is the count of issued, rejected and cast votes, as the rules say that rejected and valid votes must add up to the number of issued votes (minus, in the case of postal votes, any postal votes sent out but not returned. According to Applied IF, figures for all of these must be published.

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