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the end is a bit nigher

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Everything posted by the end is a bit nigher

  1. Obviously not, although you now have near 30k posts! I vaguely remember Blue breaking 11k. You lot have been busy.
  2. Given their policy on making work pay does anyone really think the Tories would allow a massive handout to what would in the majority be Labour voters? Middle class person A struggles to make ends meet and pay the mortgage. Chav B defaults and the government allows him a free pass out while leaving A to struggle. Can't see it myself.
  3. I saved it specially! I'm not a gold troll btw, although one of the reasons I stopped using the site was that at the time there was more about gold than houses. I have traded gold up and down in the past so no problem with discussing it, but back then (when I were lad) the discussion was more along the lines of buy gold because the world was about to end. Anyway, good to see Errol still here. Time to have a nose and see who else is left.
  4. Well, I return after a few years and people are still banging on about gold. If you had bought at peak in 1980 then in real terms you would only be down 20%!
  5. And hopefully the Government will follow the Irish lead and start withdrawing the taxbreak of offsetting income against interest payments for non-company BTLers.
  6. I sincerely hope so. There is more than one union out there that needs utterly destroying, starting with Unite. The sooner the 70s rejects are consigned to the bin, the better. Totally agree. Put time and effort into earning a decent amount of cash. Live within your means. Get shafted by the Libs. The Libs also have that clown Cable. Identifies the problem correctly and decides the solution is to get the banks lending again. Muppet. The bank of England is independent, except at times to suit Bruin, such as when he announced with pride that several central banks had cut interest rates to
  7. What else did anyone expect under the tax leech that is the Labour Government? Start high, slowly bring the level down until everyone is screwed. Then overspend against the new income and do the same again. Scum.
  8. I looked for the 'Public Sector Workers' option but couldn't see it. Could it be added please? With a few exceptions, and including their pensions, they have to be the most over-valued blood-suckers of the lot.
  9. It came from the money markets and savers but was lost against over-inflated property. The usual portrayal is off investment bankers dealing in derivaties, but the reality is quite different. Of course that doesn't suit the politics of some of the posters on here, which is why I rarely bother these days.
  10. Well, i'm still not sure the Great British public have got it yet, but anyone listening to the BBC commentary this morning should have got a hint. Losses were due to right-offs on commercial property and over-generous lending against residential property during the boom. Virtually nothing to do with investment banking.
  11. 3.5% it is Interest rates won't rise. They will hide behind the "it will come down later in the year" mantra. Stealth inflation. Do nothing when the rate is too high, but everything if it starts to fall.
  12. Errrrr, no. The shareholders of quite a few UK banks learned that if they leant money to people who couldn't pay it back then they lost most, if not all of their shareholding value, so I struggle to see how the real owners of these banks have benefitted. And you seem to have missed the cause of the reckless lending i.e. the Government dropping IRs specifically to increase borrowing to boost asset prices (Eddie George, 2003). That's what got us into this mess in the first place. You also seem to have missed the Government failing to stop the reckless lending despite being warned times of how
  13. I think you'll find you are wrong. I accept that certain Governments following Keynsian economics of borrow to spend are a threat to the stability of our societies. Don't forget, the nationalised banks have LENDING TARGETS they have to hit or be fined heavily. Those LENDING TARGETS are set by the Government, primarily to support Government policy. e.g. a key policy is for a larger private rental society created by people or organisations borrowing money to buy property. Where is the majority of this money to come from? The banks of course. I think the banks have learned a harsh lesson. I
  14. Yes, try and work out what really caused the problem. Lose your obsession with bankers and focus on the governments whose policies the banks are playing out. They are the real issue.
  15. Rough transalation: Building Socs say house prices won't rise so we won't lend you money. BTLers can't borrow so Government objective not met. IN the good old days Landlords were people who had their own money to buy property with. They didn't need someone else's money and Brown's Ponzi tax-breaks to do it.
  16. Has a look at thye IT contract market today and its a lot better than this time last year. Still 60% fewer jobs than in the boom, but 50% more than a year ago. Rates holding up ok too.
  17. Once upon a time NI went to actually caring for people, now it goes on whatever crap the Government wants to spend it on. Road tax used to go on road building and maintenance but now it goes on whatever crap the Government wants to spend it on. At least we know that income tax just goes on whatever crap the Government wants to spend it on, with no pretence otherwise.
  18. I think we should have yet another tiny tax on all bank transactions that ordinary people won't pay for. This could run alongside the Tobin tax that would go straight to the Government and the proposed feed the world tax that would also come from banking transactions. I also propose a tiny tax on bank transactions to find money to care for people in their old age, something NI used to do before it was used elsewhere. Similarly a small tax on banking transactions to bring roads back to the standard they should be. SOmething road tax was there for before it was filiter for other government purpo
  19. And that's one of the factors that influenced my decision to buy. I don't see them raising IRs to curb inflation. They may well raise them, but will always be behind the curve.
  20. Had a quick look through this thread and (apologies if I have missed it) but no-one has mentioned the obvious, which is that annuities closely reflect longer-term interest rates. If you retired in the 80s/90s when IRs were around 10% then you would have done very nicely. With interest rates near zero then you aren't going to get anything like the same return.
  21. But have a look at an inflation adjusted graph of the price of gold from 1980. you would have lost 50%. The price of gold now pretty much follows other assets. Recent falls in shares have been mirrored by falls in the price of gold and oil. Thanks for the extra book info.
  22. Institutional investment has been going on for at least 5 years. That was one of the drivers behind the price of oil in particular. Thanks for the book tip. I will look it up.
  23. Why do these union reps always think people should pay above inflation to line the pockets of council workers? His biggest complaint was that there was no consultation. Well, a message to those who are going to be leaving. For the few ex-council workers who do manage to find employment in the private sector, in the real world, you don't get consultation. You get told. And if you don't like it then you go somewhere else. Get used to it.
  24. Have you gold buggers still not realised that in the last couple of years that the direction of the price of gold has pretty much followed that of all other assets? Yes, I know it shot up from 250$ in 2002 (praise be to Gordon), but it is now being chosen as an investment just like any other. I had a pension review yesterday and was asked if I wanted to invest in gold or oil. Its mainstream now. Be aware.
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