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ska_mna

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About ska_mna

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  1. Interesting that they feel the need to stress this. They know which voting block wins them power.
  2. The #natwest twitter hashtag is a bloodbath this evening: https://twitter.com/search?q=natwest&src=typd
  3. How long does their infrastructure have to be down before they have bank run on their hands?
  4. Bump. http://www.telegraph.co.uk/finance/personalfinance/10489654/NatWest-in-technology-meltdown-on-Cyber-Monday.html
  5. It will be a popular with older voters. I was at a dinner party the other day and one chap (boomer age group) started on a mail-esque rant about Immigrants. His wife stopped him and I thought she was going to come in with a more intelligent counter argument... but instead launched into a similarly prejudiced and misinformed rant about how lazy young brits are. Our most powerful voting block is nothing more than an unholy melting pot of the blind leading the blind.
  6. Bookmarked for a full read later. Off the first page, this might ring a few bells:
  7. I think it is a positive step. I feel more empowered as a consumer when I buy a pair of socks than I do when I rent a house. Largely because the companies who I buy socks from are: i) competing in a true sock marketplace against other sock companies so want to protect their brand reputation and ii) well above the radar in terms of the regulatory system Small-time landlord chancers are none of those things. However, there is the risk that after several mergers and acquisitions and government backhanders, the institutional landlords end up as a Big Few with a virtual monopoly. Then we'll find the banks are our literal landlords.
  8. More house-sharing into later and later life. More multi-generational households. Smaller and smaller living spaces. Humans are very adaptable to circumstances, IMO. Which is unfortunate as we could do with another peasant's revolt before we get to that stage.
  9. I've now requested reimbursement for the drain company costs from the landlord. Landlord is now insinuating that it was the drain company we called out who broke the pipes! I've pointed out that we were acting on his instructions. Will see what happens next.
  10. I thought this thread was worth a bump today in light of today's news.
  11. I can imagine. :angry: My opinion is that as long as you give the property back in the same condition you received it in, then the landlord should have no right to dictate how you live your life. If that means taking larger deposits to offset risk, then that's fine with me. At the moment the situation is the "haves" dictating to the "have-nots" how they can live their lives. Jilted generation. Neo-feudalism / serfdom or whatever you want to call it. We were planning to move anyway - we took this place on short notice last year being the only place that would allow us pets at the time. The commute is too far though and the EPC rating is atrocious - transport and heating costs over that snowy winter almost bankrupted us! We're throwing the cards in the air again and hoping to land somewhere more suitable. Thanks.
  12. The landlord essentially refused to have anything to do with clearing the blockage as he said we'd caused it. Given that our bath, sink and toilet was full of crappy water and we needed to wash and didn't want to cork ourselves (!) I took the initiative. As it turns out, we didn't have anything to do with the blockage. I'm not sure why I keep ending up having showdowns and fall-outs with my landlords. Out of six landlords I've had, I've fallen out with four of them. Does the landlord "profession" just attract sociopaths or am I a ) unlucky or b ) a difficult tenant, I wonder? I know which I think it is. Time for that Peasant's Revolt, methinks.
  13. Thanks for the responses. General consensus seems to be that I shouldn't have called the initial drain company out. Another way of thinking about it by turning the events on their head: If I had refused to get a drain company out and persuaded the landlord to get one out (probably by withholding rent) and the blockage HAD turned out to be our negligence (putting stuff down there that shouldn't go down drains), I would have been happy to pay the landlords bill for the drain company given proof of the cause of the blockage. But that's not what happened - the blockage was not due to our negligence, it was down to a pipe breakage. Ergo, the reverse of the above should be true - the landlord should pick up the bill and repay me. *sigh* As it happens, we now have a break of landlord-tenant trust and are now searching for a new property under pressure of wanting to get out of here as soon as possible. It's a re-run of where we were last year when we also had a complete landlord-tenant relationship breakdown. Not sure what we're doing wrong - we're actually very easy going, personable tenants! Now the hunt is on for another rare pet-friendly tenancy. I'm so fed up of renting in this country!
  14. Hi, some advice or opinions on this would be welcome. Our drains blocked up two weeks ago (bath, toilet and bathroom sink not draining). I reported to the landlord who said get a drain cleaning company round. This surprised me a little as I thought drains/plumbing would fall into the landlord's responsibility. Anyway, I didn't want to cause a fuss so got a drain clearing company out with a jet hose at the cost of £150. They cleared the blockage and the drains started draining again. However, two weeks later, they've done it again. I reported to the landlord again and suggested that there must be something wrong with the plumbing but he was still insinuating that we'd blocked them by putting something down there that shouldn't have gone down. I called out the draining company again at the cost of another £150. This time, the drain man did some more diagnostics as well as a clear and we found that there was some kind of problem between the house and first manhole cover the garden. He suggested it was a break in the pipe. The ebbing and flowing of water and fact things were getting caught on it seemed to add up. So I reported this back to the landlord, expecting him to then take up the mantel from here on in. To my surprise, he wouldn't accept the diagnostics and said it was my word against his and that I should have got a drain company out who would put a camera up the drain to prove the break. I said that if I were to pay out for another company, the costs would be coming on for £500 in total, and if that it was a break I'd then want him to pay the money back. At this point things were starting to get a bit heated. Anyway, he wasn't budging so I said I'd have to take some legal advice and I somewhat stormed off. He did then come round half an hour later and we spent two hours together with him doing his own diagnostics. He did eventually admit that it was probably a break and would hire in a mini digger to lay a new drain. This will hopefully happen next week. OK, so my questions: 1) Should the landlord pay the £300 back to me for the two drain company visits? He claims it was my choice of company so was my problem that they didn't tell me it was a break on the first occasion. My argument is that I shouldn't have had to call them out in the first place as it's the landlord's responsibility. 2) The house will be without drainage (e.g. no toilet/sinks/bath) for a number of days while this work is done. What recourse do we have? We're actually moving out soon too, which makes things even more complicated in terms of landlord-tenant relationship. I kind-of want to get out sooner rather than later now as the relationship is pretty broken now. Boy, am I sick of landlords! My previous renting story here > Thoughts welcome.
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