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Yvonne

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  1. Perhaps there needs to be more controls in residential areas, or quotas to ensure the right balance is kept. Hiking council tax will make it a less attractive option for some, but will likely just result in higher holiday prices. It is a balance as people do want to holiday in these areas too - although people can stay on farms and in more rural locations ofcourse.
  2. Think you're spot on. Some winners...yet alot of losers. Also dont think everyone should consider anyone who got fiurlough as minted - only the case for those who got 2nd jobs...alot didn't. Anyhow unfortunately real risk at mo that inflation may erode away savings...Applies not just to houses but even 2nd hand cars a fortune now... Where we go from here...who knows...unchecked inflation or hiked interest rates perhaps.
  3. The consultant makes a very valid point about Omicron and that they should consider exceptions for those who have antibodies. Omicron makes mandatory jabs even harder to justify for NHs staff, especially if the virus mutates in to something similar to the flu - which looks the way it is going at mo.
  4. Seems they are back tracking on the compulsory jabs for NHS staff. Consultants have alot of power in the NHS, especially in certain specialisms, they cant easily replace them if they refuse vaccination. Certain jabs are mandatory for clinical staff already but imo different with covid jab as so new and we are jn such a rapidly changing landdcape. https://www.google.com/amp/s/amp.theguardian.com/society/2022/jan/07/ministers-urged-to-delay-mandatory-covid-jabs-for-nhs-staff-in-england
  5. It would be very difficult to enforce vaccination in practice. My grandma is 90 and doesn't want the jab. Had enough of pricks in her lifetime ;). It's her choice, she's been ok so far. Also, a lot of things coming out of covid are unintended consequences, and insisting on vaccination for NHS staff is just going to give the NHS bigger problems with finding suitable staff etc and damage morale further, for a virus some say will get weaker and less harmful over time (if history is anything to go by). As someone who hasn't had the jab personally (not anti-vax as a general rule - would have most vaccinations), but decided based on gender and age that I'd rather risk Covid than a jab I don't have 100% trust in currently as any long term risks are as yet unknown (plus the constantly changing narrative and biased reporting on covid risk and scare mongering has reduced my trust further). But, for certain demographics the jabs I believe are offering valuable protection. However, enforced vaccination crosses the line, and is against human rights. I also think the media have currently seized on the unvaccinated as the new scapegoats to replace immigrants (which they used to previously scapegoat), to give people someone else to blame for all the problemsm rather than the government and decision makers.
  6. Excellent point, what next? Obese people should be refused NHS treatment? And those with diabetes brought on by lifestyle choices? It's ridiculous to suggest that people who choose not to get vaccinated should have to pay extra for NHS treatment or take out insurance.
  7. Love the betrayed wife analogy. I have a friend who works in finance as an analyst and he too is saying watch and wait...expect job losses end of October...we may even have a 2nd wave....and unless the government find more money to splurge...people will have to sell. That is the problem with the current market, lots of people just listing their houses but not actually needing to sell. Way better to look again in October....only people selling at the mo imo are those willing to take offers of atleast 10% off or those who have priced their houses more reasonably to start with (not many of them around!). I offered on a house last year...they rejected it...it never sold... Just had another offer of 10% lower than asking rejected..which I explained I wouldn't increase on. I have the money (could pay full asking but not going to - estate agent conceded on all points i raised re potential negative equity being a near term possibility and he conceded it's a calculated risk and said that negative equity isn't a problem unless you want to sell....well what if you do.... Personally I think we'll see a change come winter with hopefully some people who actually need to sell their house...and government may be limited in being able to do much more to prop things up..
  8. Noticed in Cambridgeshire where I've been looking over the past few months that some new builds are putting downward pressure on the market, as they are getting cheaper and cheaper....I suppose they actually need to sell these new builds.. rather than some people who just seem to put their properties on Rightmove for the hell of it. Hopefully over the next few months we'll start to see who actually needs to sell....and prices will correct...downwards.
  9. Hmm if I want to buy a house at 450k and it falls 20%, I could potentially save 90k. Is a saving of 12.5k on stamp duty, going to make it worth my while buying an overpriced house sooner rather than later....comparing 12.5k definite to 90k possible... Some people will benefit anyway from this cut, but I'm not sure this policy will have that much effect, other than the government being seen to do something.
  10. Exactly my predicament too....I'd be in at 20% below current prices. I've been monitoring the market but planning to seriously start looking in September when more financial pain will be being felt all round and furlough etc starting to run out. I've been slightly discouraged by ridiculous asking prices for properties I'm interested in. I've informed agents I'm around and interested in a few properties but not at anywhere near the asking prices. I'd be in at 20% below asking prices and am a cash buyer. What I would say; last year if you'd contacted agents re wanting to pay 20% less they'd ignore you, now they get indignant but they still call you up to talk to you and try to convince you the property is worth it! That's quite a change....IMO things are currently generally selling for around 10% below asking prices. It's a stand off at the moment. Sellers hoping for miracle buyers to appear to pay them top dollar. Not going to happen for most imo. I've been watching the market for over a year now....(was supposed to buy one house but pulled out at the start of the pandemic) and only more reasonably priced stuff is selling....apart from that some houses just sit about unsold...others go away then reappear.... That said, I think reasonably priced properties are still selling, but there aren't many around. Having sold a property in mid 2018, I do know that actually you definitely feel more vulnerable sitting hoping for a seller to come along and give you a decent price when you need to sell than when you're looking and asking prices are too high. At the end of the day, if a property isn't selling and needs to sell, the buyers will ultimately have the power....
  11. Sorry it sounds like you're feeling pressurised about this. It's a difficult time. Although it's a hard choice, it's for you to weigh up the property's pros and cons. It does sound though like you have significant worries about the cons...and that some of them may mean that it may not be the right property for you. With this coronavirus outbreak, it's perfectly acceptable to say that with everything going on, you need to pull out and will reconsider your plans after lockdown has ended. Yes you risk losing the property. The price may be ok, it may not be - if you really loved the property if prices were to fall 20% or 30% it may not be the end of the world. There is a strong chance prices will fall soon though with the financial shock caused with the coronavirus outbreak. I guess you have to figure out if the cons outweigh the pro and how bothered you are about not having that house. If you have worries, it's perfectly acceptable to pull out at the moment and give yourself time to think.
  12. Yes think that's only the beginning. If our death toll starts to mushroom alot of people are not wanting to go take their chances...particularly since this thing seems to be airborne and not just transmitted via touching things
  13. In a similar position to some others on here. Due to buy a house (there have been delays with planning permission which isn't yet signed off). Think the impact of this coronavirus will be massive - no one will want to view houses let alone buy them for months....Went to see a house yesterday (as am thinking of pulling out of the other one and wanted to see what else was available) and the agent said they had alot of cancellations for viewings. Our death toll is currently not huge - if our death toll starts to look like Italy, think alot of people will go in to lockdown mode as far as possible (whether the government orders it or not). So restaurants, pubs etc all going to take a huge knock. Reckon we'll end up with half the population carrying on as usual and the other half going in to lockdown. I have friends on 0 hours contract who have just had their work cancelled for the next month - which will undoubtedly turn out to be 3 months at least.... Hard to see how the economy isn't going to take a massive nosedive. Re the house purchase my problem is the owner of the house would be my potential neighbour - also really love the house and looked for ages....so think if I go to them with a new revised offer they will totally hate me and you don't want that with neighbours. So think I'll just have to pull out and look for something else....or have them come to me with counter offers - suggestions. Rock and a hard place in some ways, as would prefer not to have so much money in the bank...and bricks and mortars could be safer, but cannot stomach potentially overpaying by 80k (house I'm buying is 430k). On the flip side I am actually also glad to have money in the bank in some ways....as at least if my business goes tits up I have cash I can live off. My sister was due to buy a house and opted to pull out 2 weeks ago because of this virus thing also....
  14. Imo it's unreasonable for sellers to put Offers Over in the current climate. Deluded. It puts everyone off, I was told this by an estate agent last year so can only imagine what they are saying to vendors now! I was also told that reducing the price by 25k opens you up to a whole different market as like someone else said, some people don't like to negotiate too much, to a level they would deem as cheeky, so won't even consider those houses listed above a certain price level. Generally I just avoid houses listed Offers Over like the plague now as it says they aren't truly interested in selling so I don't waste my time. Good to hear that offers of 20% below the asking price are being considered....Fingers and toes crossed for everyone.
  15. I'm actively looking at the moment. Been looking for a while now following getting divorced... Just put an offer in on a house near Colchester, priced at 450k. Started at 10% below then went up to 420k, both offers rejected. Agent indicated 425k would probably be acceptable but not sure I like it enough as I'm thinking I'd probably rather be closer to Cambridge than Colchester (v flexible on location), so going to let it go and 5k extra still has to be earnt at the end of the day. Also garden was a bit small for me and the cat (really the cat is running the house search lol). Of all the houses I've been to see (and I've seen probably around 10 or so now) over the past few months, they're all still on the market. Imo there is a stand off at the moment between buyers ready to buy at a realistic price and sellers wanting the maximum price for their property and in denial about possible impact of hard Brexit. Especially at certain price levels though, buyers willing to pay top dollar just aren't there. The only houses I'm seeing come and go quickly on rightmove are those priced to sell....
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