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JST

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  1. Laurejon please stop writing this drivel you clearly know nothing about.
  2. Bottom line is the penalty charges don't reflect the loss suffered by the bank. If they did they would attempt to justify them. The fact that they affect some of the more vulnerable in society (or financially irresponsible as you would have it) is a side issue. This principal applies just as equally in commercial contracts etc. and is entirely fair. i.e. the purpose of a clause for liquidated damages must be to reflect actual loss suffered and not to punish the wrongdoes/party in breach.
  3. Precisely. I for one am glad that people are taking responsibility for reclaiming these unlawful charges. On the issue of penalty charges the relationship between banks is no different from any other commercial contract. The Dunlop Pneumatic Tyre v New Garage case is relevant in thousands of construction and orther commercial contracts each year. If businesses can rely on this when entering into an agreement then why not the consumer? The fact that these charges are unlawful is evident by banks failure to actually defend any of these claims.
  4. In fairness I think Liz did extraordinarily well. She was articulate and intelligent throughout the interview. Of course the panel were heavily weighted against her, which didn't make things easy. Also, I think she has had to adopt a diplomatic approach to gain the media exposure to Priced Out.
  5. I've voted. Whatever your views on the politics, the free market etc., you should vote. Getting house prices (and the government's failure to control a massive bubble) on to the political agenda is a big issue. Only about 20 or 30 people have voted since yesterday, meaning the gun lobby are doing better than us! Please get voting on this; it only takes a short time to register.
  6. I've voted. Whatever your views on the politics, the free market etc., you should vote. Getting house prices (and the government's failure to control a massive bubble) on to the political agenda is a big issue. Only about 20 or 30 people have voted since yesterday, meaning the gun lobby are doing better than us! Please get voting on this; it only takes a short time to register.
  7. Seattle is one of my favourite cities in the world. When I've visited before I found its residents to be urbane and largely liberal in outlook. Interestingly Seattle was at the epicentre of the dot-com crash. I recall visiting in 2001, when many of the former dot com employees were left looking for a new career.
  8. Martin Lewis was good enough to post on this site I recall - many months ago. Sorry, don't have the link.
  9. The thing that surprises me about these flats is the lack of parking. I've recently been looking at these flats (to rent not buy, I hasten to add) and am amazed by this. Granted some do have underground parking, but many don't. Who'd really pay £130,000 + for a flat with no parking?
  10. Thanks for all the advice on this thread. I'm due to start my new job in less than two weeks, but haven't found anywhere to live yet. I think it'll probably be Chapel Allerton or Roundhay as I don't know the city that well and these areas seem to be centrally located with plenty to do. I'm resigned to paying a minimum of £500 per month though. As an alternative I've thought about trying city centre new builds as there seem to be some reasonable deals on these.
  11. er...on the subject of tax abusers, what about this one. John Prescott - Deputy Prime Minister- responsible for ??? 1. 134,000 a year salary, 2. chauffeured Jaguar car, 3. grace-and-favour flat at Admiralty Arch 4. official country residence Dorneywood, in Buckinghamshire 5. £104,000 expenses 6. £300,000 cost of houses 7. £600,000 p/a total cost to tax payer The only saving grace being that at least he has no department to screw up (however, when we're paying approx £600,000 per year that's not much comfort)
  12. Obviously this is old news, but I've never seen this on HPC before so thought it was worth posting. I came across this speech of Stephen Nickell (our favourite MPC member) on the b of e's website. http://www.bankofengland.co.uk/publication...5/speech255.pdf In it Nickell considers what role the boe should have in controlling asset bubble's. He conclude's that it's impossible to say whether housing is in a bubble or not and in any event to have prevented it the boe would have had to have raised interest rates considerably, which would have substantially reduced GDP. It seems to be an in
  13. Actually if your house is repossessed then the lender can still pursue you 12 years later for the shortfall and accrued interest. So repossession is no get of jail card.
  14. Apologies if this has already been posted. The whole article's worth a read at: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/money/main.jhtm.../17/ixcoms.html Here's his view on the UK housing market:
  15. could also be classic head and shoulders pattern
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