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RajD

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  1. Come on now. That sort of attitude isn't going to get you anywhere. If we hadn't bailed out the banks and pandered to their every desire, we would now be living in a Mad Max-type post-acopalyptic world full of credit-deprived zombies chewing each others' faces off. It's a long article, so here's a quick summary - CON #1 THE SWOOP AND SQUAT Sell toxic MBS's to people who think they're buying investment-grade instruments. Buy an insurance policy against the known-to-be-toxic MBS's going bad. Push the insurance company to collapse by demanding cash collateral when the MBS's start going bad. Rely on your friends in the treasury to collect on the insurance payout - thank you very much Mr. Taxpayer. CON #2 THE DOLLAR STORE Institutions that were, in reality, high-risk gambling houses were allowed to masquerade as conservative commercial banks. As a result of this new designation, they were given access to a virtually endless tap of "free money" by unsuspecting taxpayers. In one of the most common maneuvers, they simply took the money they borrowed from the government at zero percent and lent it back to the government by buying Treasury bills that paid interest of three or four percent. It was basically a license to print money — no different than attaching an ATM to the side of the Federal Reserve. CON #3 THE PIG IN THE POKE One of the first times we saw the scam appear was in September 2008, right around the time that AIG was imploding. That was when the Fed changed some of its collateral rules, meaning banks that could once borrow only against sound collateral, like Treasury bills or AAA-rated corporate bonds, could now borrow against pretty much anything — including some of the mortgage-backed sewage that got us into this mess in the first place. In other words, banks that once had to show a real pig to borrow from the Fed could now show up with a cat and get pig money. "All of a sudden, banks were allowed to post absolute shit to the Fed's balance sheet," says the manager of the prominent hedge fund. The Pig in the Poke also came into play in April of last year, when Congress pushed a little-known agency called the Financial Accounting Standards Board, or FASB, to change the so-called "mark-to-market" accounting rules. Until this rule change, banks had to assign a real-market price to all of their assets. But last April, FASB changed all that. From now on, it announced, banks could avoid reporting losses on some of their crappy cat investments simply by declaring that they would "more likely than not" hold on to them until they recovered their pig value. In short, the banks didn't even have to actually hold on to the toxic shit they owned — they just had to sort of promise to hold on to it. That's why the "profit" numbers of a lot of these banks are really a joke. In many cases, we have absolutely no idea how many cats are in their proverbial bag. What they call "profits" might really be profits, only minus undeclared millions or billions in losses. "They're hiding all this stuff from their shareholders," says Ritholtz, who was disgusted that the banks lobbied for the rule changes. "Now, suddenly banks that were happy to mark to market on the way up don't have to mark to market on the way down." CON #4 THE RUMANIAN BOX Gordon Clown is known to have a rather large one of these. One of the great innovations of Victor Lustig, the legendary Depression-era con man who wrote the famous "Ten Commandments for Con Men," was a thing called the "Rumanian Box." This was a little machine that a mark would put a blank piece of paper into, only to see real currency come out the other side. In March of last year, the Fed sharply expanded a radical new program called quantitative easing, which effectively operated as a real-live Rumanian Box. The government put stacks of paper in one side, and out came $1.2 trillion "real" dollars. The government used some of that freshly printed money to prop itself up by purchasing Treasury bonds — a desperation move, since Washington's demand for cash was so great post-Cluster****** '08 that even the Chinese couldn't buy U.S. debt fast enough to keep America afloat. But the Fed used most of the new cash to buy mortgage-backed securities in an effort to spur home lending — instantly creating a massive market for major banks. And what did the banks do with the proceeds? Among other things, they bought Treasury bonds, essentially lending the money back to the government, at interest. The money that came out of the magic Rumanian Box went from the government back to the government, with Wall Street stepping into the circle just long enough to get paid. CON #5 THE BIG MITT In more ways than one can count, the economy in the bailout era turned into a "Big Mitt," the con man's name for a rigged poker game. Everybody was indeed looking at everyone else's cards, in many cases with state sanction. Only taxpayers and clients were left out of the loop. One of the best examples of the banks blatantly gambling, and winning, on government moves was the Public-Private Investment Program, or PPIP. In this bizarre scheme cooked up by goofball-geek Treasury Secretary Tim Geithner, the government loaned money to hedge funds and other private investors to buy up the absolutely most toxic horseshit on the market — the same kind of high-risk, high-yield mortgages that were most responsible for triggering the financial chain reaction in the fall of 2008. These satanic deals were the basic currency of the bubble: Jobless dope fiends bought houses with no money down, and the big banks wrapped those mortgages into securities and then sold them off to pensions and other suckers as investment-grade deals. The whole point of the PPIP was to get private investors to relieve the banks of these dangerous assets before they hurt any more innocent bystanders. But what did the banks do instead, once they got wind of the PPIP? They started buying that worthless crap again, presumably to sell back to the government at inflated prices! In the third quarter of last year, Goldman, Morgan Stanley, Citigroup and Bank of America combined to add $3.36 billion of exactly this horseshit to their balance sheets. CON #6 THE WIRE To help them screw their own clients, the major investment banks employ high-speed computer programs that can glimpse orders from investors before the deals are processed and then make trades on behalf of the banks at speeds of fractions of a second. None of them will admit it, but everybody knows what this computerized trading — known as "flash trading" — really is. "Flash trading is nothing more than computerized front-running," says the prominent hedge-fund manager. The SEC voted to ban flash trading in September, but five months later it has yet to issue a regulation to put a stop to the practice. CON #7 THE RELOAD It's important to remember that the housing bubble itself was a classic confidence game — the Ponzi scheme. The Ponzi scheme is any scam in which old investors must be continually paid off with money from new investors to keep up what appear to be high rates of investment return. Residential housing was never as valuable as it seemed during the bubble; the soaring home values were instead a reflection of a continual upward rush of new investors in mortgage-backed securities, a rush that finally collapsed in 2008. But by the end of 2009, the unimaginable was happening: The bubble was re-inflating. A bailout policy that was designed to help us get out from under the bursting of the largest asset bubble in history inadvertently produced exactly the opposite result, as all that government-fueled capital suddenly began flowing into the most dangerous and destructive investments all over again. Wall Street was going for the reload.
  2. A well-written piece putting together all of the con tricks that wall street has foisted off on us unsuspecting dummies - http://www.rollingstone.com/politics/story/32255149/wall_streets_bailout_hustle/print
  3. Interesting but very long article. Worth a look though. Looks like we're headed for a disastrous 2010. http://www.marketskeptics.com/2009/12/2010-food-crisis-for-dummies.html
  4. Yes. Just like the G8 summit. Waste of time. Much pontification. Little action.
  5. Number 4 and 6 definitely had tough paper rounds. Look more like they're in their 30s than 20s.
  6. Don't be silly. There were no such things as hurricanes, floods, typhoons or droughts before the genesis of mankind.
  7. Einstein was wrong. The problems we face today can clearly be solved at the same level of thinking we were at when we created them. What a dufus.
  8. Looks like Merv isn't quite as assured as you - World 'losing faith in debt-laden UK': Bank's warning over the nation's credit rating
  9. If only we could get all the politicians together to agree to stop those darned developing countries from using the resources that we so badly need on the pretext of some global catastrophe, that would be good. The Western way of life is non-negotiable.
  10. I'm sorry? What? It's impossible to read your posts. Your avatar is strangely hypnotic.
  11. Well, it could be added retrospectively to stop people from asking you to defend the main points in your post, which, because it's your post, you are implicitly assumed to agree with. Unfortunately I discovered that you can't edit the main topic post retrospectively.
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