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A.steve

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  1. I think a more relevant question is to ask if the Economist demographic expect to be judged... or if they would like others to think they will be judged. I think it interesting that many narratives, in recent years, have tended towards biblical apocalypses. I've long suspected that this is what the elite think about when they've run out of any better ideas. Might this be 'a sign' - that the incumbent elite are losing their grasp?
  2. The good news is that this correlates with earlier mortality... so, everything should self-correct. If as many as 42m are a major concern, we should expect a fair proportion to have died before 2040... that should make the stats look much more palatable.
  3. I didn't deny that EV sales were cutting demand for petroleum liquid fuels. I did ridicule you for suggesting that an effect would be noticeable in today's retail pricing of fuel. I think a good analogy would be for you to stand facing due East, sneeze, then argue that the today will be longer as a result. Your film argument also fails - it compares dissimilar things and draws an irrelevant comparison. As I remember it, 35mm film was always an expensive game... so, it's no surprise to me now that it still is. Digital cameras were expensive - now they aren't. I'm pretty sure that, if I wanted to develop film (obviously at a sensible scale) I could do so today (adjusted for inflation) cheaper than it could have been done 30 years ago. I can see the point in being able to develop film as art... and I suspect that is cheaper today (in real terms) than it ever has been previously. I never saw the point of buying envelopes of prints... except, I suppose, as a weapon that could be used to bore your enemies to death at parties. I suppose you've admitted your initial argument was daft by telling me that I "just don't notice it yet" - I don't notice it... because it hasn't happened. Prices for petrol and diesel are not rising at the pump because a few people have bought electric cars... the real cause is different to the one you proposed.
  4. I was always of the opinion that people tend not to 'use' horses because better technologies now exist. Real world observations do not align with your narrative. Might your judgement be subject to perceptual blinkers... sold to you by an EV propagandist? 🙂
  5. Are horses so expensive to keep in the 21st Century? Consider the relative cost of transport for a horse before WWI versus today. Today, just a few thousand for a horse-box; a few hundred for Hunter wellies - and under two-quid a litre for fuel solves mobility for your horse. Prior to WWI, you'd have needed to invent horse boxes; build factories to make them; develop a petrochemical industry and establish a luxury brand of footwear for the horse owner... which, I can assure you, in real terms, would have been much more expensive back in the day. Bringing it back to house prices... Has anyone else noted that, like-for-like, large houses with Equestrian Facilities are cheaper than those without?
  6. https://www.zazzle.co.uk/create_your_own_wine_bottle_label-256332126393769864?rf=238660393881987057&tc=EAIaIQobChMIuZ_S9qvs9wIVBGHmCh0W5ADgEAQYAyABEgKZ6fD_BwE&utm_source=google&utm_medium=cpc&utm_campaign=uk_shopping_gbp_home_1&ca_chid=2001810&ca_source=gaw&ca_nw=g&ca_dev=c&ca_cid=569591767401&ca_agid=133855740471&ca_caid=15525884070&ca_adid=569591767401&ca_tid=pla-1479442255328&ca_lp=9045572&gncclsrc=aw.ds&gclid=EAIaIQobChMIuZ_S9qvs9wIVBGHmCh0W5ADgEAQYAyABEgKZ6fD_BwE&dz=17791ef5-c4a4-4180-b662-7cf09ee9de84
  7. The only problem with an acknowledged 10% drop is that it would undermine confidence in rising prices... which would make further falls inevitable. An acknowledged 10% drop would make me expect a 75% drop in some prices, and a small rise in others. Best of luck making people feel confident to invest in that context.
  8. Perhaps. One has to wonder: do you want one? How far would you go, personally, to help create one? Are you the sort of lazy person who would settle for a Wintertide of mild frustration - because that requires less effort? As far as I can see, all we really need is for a (superficially) credible leader-figure to suggest it - and the public will make it so. For weirdos, who don't want a Winter of Discontent, perhaps there is solace that Britain doesn't seem to have any such figures. Does this need rebranding - to keep it fresh and "modern"? Can anyone here come up with a slogan, jingle, rap, mime or interpretive dance to promote this?
  9. LOL. I like it. The price is going up because there's less demand... Take your place on a pedestal next to George Soros. Classical economics states that reduced demand implies reduced prices; Soros' reflexivity says reduced prices can mean reduced demand; you've discovered that having an electric car makes you think that the influence of your evangelical tribe of electric car owners is paramount... and that everything you're not actively pursuing yourself is no-longer commercially viable as a result. As for it being the fault of the Russians, it's difficult to see the logic for that - unless you think that Russian geopolitics directly influences not only the price of raw materials - but, also, the retail price of refined fuel. I'm not buying-in. I think it curious how we had a mini, obviously orchestrated, fuel crisis... a few months before all the suppliers, simultaneously, decided to hike prices and take greater profits.
  10. What thing has had it's hardness underestimated? (No innuendo intended.) I share anonguest's apprehensions... not because I consider it likely that politicians are innocent - but because I find huge delays difficult to rationally explain. If 5% of the population (is that 5% of men, or 5% of the population - are we assuming men and women are equally 'utterly horrible'?) are rapists, and people chose to rape, then we should expect many victims from each rapist... it would seem likely that most people would have been raped - and many multiple times. I think the reality is very different... the terminology promotes the idea that either 'everything was fine' or 'one party is solely responsible for having committed a heinous criminal act'. Where long delays occur, I find myself wondering: perhaps both parties did not conduct themselves as would have been ideal... and the allegation of criminality only emerges after time has taken care of some of the inconvenient details. We think of this kind of crime as having been conducted by an aggressive stranger against a completely innocent victim who had no way to avoid the situation. It seems more likely, to me, that problems would occur more frequently where both parties went down a path that ended badly. Salacious, for sure, but - perhaps - not quite as portrayed in the media? Obviously, if one engages, socially, with untrustworthy, self-entitled, people... one is more likely to encounter problems. Perhaps this is why MPs seem to run into a disproportionate number of 'scrapes' like this?
  11. https://www.reuters.com/world/uk/uk-asks-competition-regulator-look-into-fuel-retailers-2022-05-17/ Curious - eh? Is this about infringement of competition or consumer law... or... is this about government having pursued policies of high inflation... involving policies promoting shortage... and an entire industry has taken note of the opportunities? Why should decreasing fuel duty not be seen as an opportunity for retailers to increase profit margins?
  12. Nice one. At what level would you estimate the average UK adult numeracy?
  13. One thing that really surprised me was how stable my spending patterns were between having negligible income as a student and... later when costs of day-to-day life were no-longer an issue. If anything, I think (adjusted for inflation) I've spent less the more easily I've been able to spend. I see something analogous when I observe others... where the importance of getting/doing things that are expensive correlates inversely with how easily I could pay to get/do those things. I suspect it can be explained by psychology.
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