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Sipp Guidance Please.


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#1 longtomsilver

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Posted 05 May 2012 - 12:41 PM

I've just got in by a whisker and have managed to change my mortgage from repayment to interest only but still intend to make use of the 10% overpayment rule twice in the next five years.

Question is, I have £7k in equities (up from £5k since November, done particularly well on REC.L (+38%), IQE.L (+20%) and SLP.L (-10%) they are the main ones. Not in an ISA anyway...

Am I correct, If I sell up and transfer the cash to my wife and she puts it in her SIPP as she pays tax then she'll get £8,500 to play with? Plus transfer ofa smaller poorly performing Scottish widows pension worth £1,500 then that's £10k to play with.

Mix will be...

30% IQE
25% SLP
15% REC
15% Nokia
15% Halliburton

Start of a diverse global portfolio which we will add to by approximately 4 other companies a year.
10 years ago we had Steve Jobs, Bob Hope and Johnny Cash - Now we have no Jobs, no Hope and no Cash So, what left? Alcohol.

John Baker, Aberdeen 8/10/2011 22:34
http://www.dailymail...n.html#comments

"the world seems a better place when you're wearing beer goggles".

Quote buried in same article from 27 year old female subject painting the town of Cardiff red on a booze fuelled night out.

#2 Voice of Reason

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Posted 05 May 2012 - 01:10 PM

£7k invested in a SIPP would become £8750 after the addition of basic rate tax relief.

Your wife needs to have income of at least £8750 this tax year to justify the contribution (otherwise she's limited to a gross contribution of 100% of earnings or £3600, whichever is greater).

You can't transfer a pension in your name to a SIPP in hers (if that's what you were suggesting).

£10k is a very small amount to invest in single company shares and SIPP charges might also prove a significant drag on performance.

Not sure what relevence your Mortgage situation has to your question or what you mean by "get in by a whisker"?
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#3 longtomsilver

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Posted 05 May 2012 - 01:32 PM

The old pensions hers not mine and the letter that came with it states that it'll pay £148 per annun from aged 60 assuming 7% per annun growth for the term. In every year since 2008 it has dropped in value by ~£30-40 a time :rolleyes:

Wife is a higher rate tax payer and this is what we are trying to push down so I keep the child benefit and continuity of contributions for my NI records. Yes, it's a small amount but even a journey of a thousand miles begins with a first step. Going interest only will allow her to put aside upto £1k a month which will mean 4-6 sizable investments in individual companies... assuming a trading fee of £11.95 on a £2k deal, stamp duty at 0.5% and the first year fund charge of 0.5% that's only 1.6% going down to 0.5% per annun in perpetuity thereafter. Is that excessive compared to the managed global portfolio annual charge of 1.5-1.75%

This isn't her main pension. Her company pension is 6% contribution and employer puts in an additional 9% still putting her well over the higher rate tax threshold :(

Edited by longtomsilver, 05 May 2012 - 02:25 PM.

10 years ago we had Steve Jobs, Bob Hope and Johnny Cash - Now we have no Jobs, no Hope and no Cash So, what left? Alcohol.

John Baker, Aberdeen 8/10/2011 22:34
http://www.dailymail...n.html#comments

"the world seems a better place when you're wearing beer goggles".

Quote buried in same article from 27 year old female subject painting the town of Cardiff red on a booze fuelled night out.

#4 rit

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Posted 05 May 2012 - 11:36 PM

You will be able to transfer the value of your ISA to your wife, but not the pension in your own name as this can not be transferred.

Once your wife has the funds she will be able to set up a pension (in her name) and so receive 40% tax rebate.

For such a small fund you will need a low cost provider who allows share dealing so look at a company such as H&L, they have low yearly costs compared to many SIPP providers for small accounts. Your wife will not end up with £8,500 directly in the account unless she add more funds to begin with. Any funds added are increased by the provider to cover basic 20% tax, the additional 20% of higher rate tax is something that you reclaim via the yearly tax return.

#5 porca misèria

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Posted 06 May 2012 - 08:15 AM

The tax-efficient thing is for your missus to put her 40% money into a SIPP.

Your money isn't relevant to that. At least, not directly. It becomes relevant if you (as a couple) spend more money than your 0% and "20%" allowances. In that case, cashing in your investments and using them as spending money frees up more overtaxed income to go into the SIPP.

#6 longtomsilver

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Posted 06 May 2012 - 10:58 AM

The tax-efficient thing is for your missus to put her 40% money into a SIPP.

Your money isn't relevant to that. At least, not directly. It becomes relevant if you (as a couple) spend more money than your 0% and "20%" allowances. In that case, cashing in your investments and using them as spending money frees up more overtaxed income to go into the SIPP.


Rit - we are going with HL ;)

Thanks. I'm expecting a cash bung soon and we will spend that so the wife can sacrifice more taxed income into her SIPP.

With regards to the tax return, if she put in 800 a month and the inland revenue top it up to 1000, how do we get the other 20% is it just paid out as a tax refund or does it have to be paid back into the SIPP not a problem either way.

Cheers.

:)
10 years ago we had Steve Jobs, Bob Hope and Johnny Cash - Now we have no Jobs, no Hope and no Cash So, what left? Alcohol.

John Baker, Aberdeen 8/10/2011 22:34
http://www.dailymail...n.html#comments

"the world seems a better place when you're wearing beer goggles".

Quote buried in same article from 27 year old female subject painting the town of Cardiff red on a booze fuelled night out.

#7 porca misèria

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Posted 08 May 2012 - 08:37 AM

With regards to the tax return, if she put in 800 a month and the inland revenue top it up to 1000, how do we get the other 20% is it just paid out as a tax refund or does it have to be paid back into the SIPP not a problem either way.

She puts in £800.

The pension provider claims £200 from HMRC, so there's £1000 in the SIPP. But that's a double-edged sword: pension income is taxable (albeit at a lower rate than hard-earned), so much of that £200 is just deferred.

She fills in her tax return, whereupon the tax on that £1000 is reduced to just the component known as "NI" (the one that clings). If tax was originally paid at a nominal 40% then HMRC refund her the remainder of that 40%, which is £200. The second £200 is for real, and absolutely worth claiming.

#8 longtomsilver

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Posted 09 May 2012 - 12:36 PM

She puts in £800.

The pension provider claims £200 from HMRC, so there's £1000 in the SIPP. But that's a double-edged sword: pension income is taxable (albeit at a lower rate than hard-earned), so much of that £200 is just deferred.

She fills in her tax return, whereupon the tax on that £1000 is reduced to just the component known as "NI" (the one that clings). If tax was originally paid at a nominal 40% then HMRC refund her the remainder of that 40%, which is £200. The second £200 is for real, and absolutely worth claiming.


+1

Thank you.

+2

Plain English :)
10 years ago we had Steve Jobs, Bob Hope and Johnny Cash - Now we have no Jobs, no Hope and no Cash So, what left? Alcohol.

John Baker, Aberdeen 8/10/2011 22:34
http://www.dailymail...n.html#comments

"the world seems a better place when you're wearing beer goggles".

Quote buried in same article from 27 year old female subject painting the town of Cardiff red on a booze fuelled night out.




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