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Why Don't Black Americans Swim


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#31 shipbuilder

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Posted 09 April 2012 - 08:46 AM

Was it ever less than blindingly obvious that participation in sports and other activities is mainly due to opportunity, culture and socio-economic status?
Maybe the working classes don't have the requisite balance to ride horses and play polo, or perhaps the upper and middle classes have naturally wider shoulders and are more suited to rugby than football....
"If human vices such as greed or envy are systematically cultivated, the inevitable result is nothing less than a collapse of intelligence. A man driven by greed or envy loses the power of seeing things as they really are, of seeing things in their roundness and wholeness, and his very successes become failures. If whole societies become infected by these vices, they may indeed achieve astonishing things but they become increasingly incapable of solving the most elementary problems of everyday existence. The Gross National Product may rise rapidly: as measured by statisticians but not as experienced by actual people, who find themselves oppressed by increasing frustration, alienation, insecurity, and so forth. After a while, even the Gross National Product refuses to rise any further, not because of scientific or technological failure, but because of a creeping paralysis of non-cooperation, as expressed in various types of escapism on the part, not only of the oppressed and exploited, but even of highly privileged groups"

E.F. Schumacher, 'Small is Beautiful', 1973.

"Modern methods of production have given us the possibility of ease and security for all; we have chosen, instead, to have overwork for some and starvation for others. Hitherto we have continued to be as energetic as we were before there were machines; in this we have been foolish, but there is no reason to go on being foolish forever".

Bertrand Russell, 'In Praise of Idleness', 1932.

"The first man who, having fenced in a piece of land, said "This is mine," and found people nave enough to believe him, that man was the true founder of civil society. From how many crimes, wars, and murders, from how many horrors and misfortunes might not any one have saved mankind, by pulling up the stakes, or filling up the ditch, and crying to his fellows: Beware of listening to this impostor; you are undone if you once forget that the fruits of the earth belong to us all, and the earth itself to nobody.

Jean-Jacques Rousseau, 'Discourse on Inequality', 1754.

#32 TheBlueCat

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Posted 09 April 2012 - 09:15 PM

Pro-Cycling is going through a similar questioning process. Paris-Roubaix yesterday, didn't see a single black rider in the peleton. In the Tour de France I believe there was a single black in 156 riders.

Cycling is coming to the conclusion that it's just considered to be a northern european fascination.

I'm not a buyer of these genetic explanations for ability at sport (at least not the ones strongly corrolated to skin colour*) and, in the case of cycling, you've got to think the differences are totally cultural. If Kenyan runners can win every marathon going then, from a genetic perspective, there's absolutely nothing stopping Kenyans from being world class cyclists.

* single gene theories, on the other hand, are very interesting and backed up by solid evidence. A great example being the altitude sickness thing: http://www.livescien...e-sickness.html

#33 TheBlueCat

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Posted 09 April 2012 - 09:20 PM

Was it ever less than blindingly obvious that participation in sports and other activities is mainly due to opportunity, culture and socio-economic status?
Maybe the working classes don't have the requisite balance to ride horses and play polo, or perhaps the upper and middle classes have naturally wider shoulders and are more suited to rugby than football....

Quite, although I don't think it's always the case that one class it trying to keep another out; more often than not it's just a matter of habit. I like cycling because I grew up in a small rural town where all the kids cycled everywhere and because my dad used to take me to watch time trials. Similarly, I'd guess that many Rugby Union players like the sport because they went to to a private school and that's what they played. There may be some sports where there's a genuine antipathy to newcomers but I think it's pretty rare.

edit:spelling

Edited by tbatst2000, 09 April 2012 - 09:21 PM.


#34 bergkamp N4

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Posted 10 April 2012 - 12:06 AM

[quote name='pl1' timestamp='1333807814' post='909008506']
http://www.bbc.co.uk...canada-11172054


I really don't get this story, is it that difficult to swim. I always thought swimming was like whistling insofar as you put your lips together and blow i.e. just push your arms forward and kick your legs. Clearly not, swimming really is something you need to be taught?



OP why are you posting this on a site that is about the insane house prices
and then some one else posting some dumb Leroy comment which is neither helpful or remotely funny....... six teenagers died and going from the ages and family names it looks like 2 sets of three brothers.
I really feel for the families.




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