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Moving To Germany


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#76 Landagan

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Posted 06 October 2011 - 07:13 AM

Based on my experiences in Spain.

By far the biggest obstacle you will find to learning the language will be the insistence of everyone you meet to speak English to you.

I'm not sure why it's so hard to combat, but it really is. even down to family level in my experience.

They are forced to learn our language to apply for jobs.
They have all put many years into learning, and quite often you will be the only way they can display that effort, and make it all feel worthwhile.

They have NO concern about your own need to learn their language. Prepare to feel ostracised along these lines.

You will find yourself very popular when speaking English, and very unpopular when not.

So unless you have SERIOUS time to study and study hard, do not assume that you will pick up anything by immersion.

#77 Snugglybear

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Posted 06 October 2011 - 07:14 AM

No, more like 1988-1995 again (when loads of Brits, especially manual workers, went to Germany for work).


There was even a fictional television drama made about the above, which ran to four series.

Look up "Auf Wiedersehen Pet" on the interweb.

#78 Rupert The

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Posted 06 October 2011 - 07:58 AM

A few years ago, I was in Amsterdam & happened to meet a bunch of IT people (I also work in IT).

In their view, for most IT jobs, speaking English was more important than speaking Dutch.
They even said that if I (as a non-Dutch speaker) & a Dutch national who did not speak English applied for the same job, all other factors being equal, I would get the job.

I checked out a couple of agencies & sure enough, quite a lot of vacancies specified the ability to speak English as a requirement.

I'm not sure how their job market is now though.

#79 swissy_fit

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Posted 06 October 2011 - 08:37 AM

For gods sake Swissy_fit please try to fit in or give it a rest!
Snobs in Paris French womans knickers etc etc

:)
I fit in fine, in provincial France or Switzerland. Parisiens and Parisiennes frequently annoy me(despite their beautiful city and beautiful accents which I love), we all have our little failings....
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The logical financial outcome is deflation. The logical political outcome is inflation. (Thanks to Injin 21st Sept 2008)

#80 abroad

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Posted 06 October 2011 - 10:39 AM

Biggest issue is getting a position, language will come if you need it. I moved to Germany in 99 and could work fully in German in a year. I really only needed it in German only meetings of which there were a few of every month, specifically Geschaefleitungs(site mgt team) and Works Council meetings. In the office we used to speak German in mornings and English in the PM so everyone got a go at it, everyone wanted to speak their second language.

I moved to Belgium 6 years ago, my French is now OK enough to get by now but its not as good as my German as I dont need ot use it as much, my wife and daughter speak fluent French and German and my daughter also speaks Dutch. Its all about need, if you need it then you will learn it. Get teh kids into local school. My daughter moved from primary school in Germany to primary in Belgium and spoke no French befoe the move, 6 months and she spoke French. Dutch was easy for her as she already spoke German and was mother tongue English speaker.

I would recommend some immersion classes before you go to at least help you make out the words, otherwise it just sounds like noise. The regional differences in German are pretty large so regardless of where you go it will be different from your high(Hoch) German that you will learn in the UK.

If you want it then its possible, its not always easy but its not massively difficult. We actively avoided the ex pat thing and international schools but still ended up with a lots of English speaking friends.

Find a job first, then plan the rest round it. Tax is higher as is healthcare costs so take that into account. Rent until you are sure its where you want to live and work long term. Set a minimum termof 2-3 years, it will fly in.

#81 hotairmail

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Posted 06 October 2011 - 10:48 AM

Biggest issue is getting a position, language will come if you need it. I moved to Germany in 99 and could work fully in German in a year. I really only needed it in German only meetings of which there were a few of every month, specifically Geschaefleitungs(site mgt team) and Works Council meetings. In the office we used to speak German in mornings and English in the PM so everyone got a go at it, everyone wanted to speak their second language.

I moved to Belgium 6 years ago, my French is now OK enough to get by now but its not as good as my German as I dont need ot use it as much, my wife and daughter speak fluent French and German and my daughter also speaks Dutch. Its all about need, if you need it then you will learn it. Get teh kids into local school. My daughter moved from primary school in Germany to primary in Belgium and spoke no French befoe the move, 6 months and she spoke French. Dutch was easy for her as she already spoke German and was mother tongue English speaker.

I would recommend some immersion classes before you go to at least help you make out the words, otherwise it just sounds like noise. The regional differences in German are pretty large so regardless of where you go it will be different from your high(Hoch) German that you will learn in the UK.

If you want it then its possible, its not always easy but its not massively difficult. We actively avoided the ex pat thing and international schools but still ended up with a lots of English speaking friends.

Find a job first, then plan the rest round it. Tax is higher as is healthcare costs so take that into account. Rent until you are sure its where you want to live and work long term. Set a minimum termof 2-3 years, it will fly in.


I learnt German in the 1970's. Looking back we were still hard up in this country following the second world war although we didn't realise that at the time.

Our German texts were actually pre War and extremely formal. "Das Schone Deutchland"...seems to have been based on a series of postcards depicting Third Reich Germany...a heifting to the land commmon in propaganda.

http://www.akpool.co...ene-deutschland



Still not as bad as our more modern French text that included a typical French family in normal settings who had a monkey (Nikki le singe) as their pet. I grew up believing all French families had monkeys as pets.



#82 kazap

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Posted 06 October 2011 - 12:13 PM

If I were doing it I would probably set up my own business and work with English speakers over the internet. I already earn 3-400 a month through some hobby websites so I'd hope that doing it fall time I could make a reasonable living.

Personally moving abroad has no interest for me (even though my wife and son are bi-lingual!) as I think you just replace one set of problems with a whole new set. Unless of course you have a real connection / passion for the new country.

Not sure now is a good time to move to the Eurozone!

What I might do is move to a more remote part of the UK, coming from London there are plenty of places I could now move to mortgage free, this would allow one to take the risk of setting up an online business which just has to make enough to cover costs. Sounds attractive but would one be any better off?

#83 guitarman001

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Posted 06 October 2011 - 12:24 PM

I'm an engineer thinking of moving to Germany in a year or two's time.
I've been using Michel Thomas, a few books, and Deutsche Welle (THE resource to use).

#84 hotairmail

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Posted 06 October 2011 - 01:15 PM

If I were doing it I would probably set up my own business and work with English speakers over the internet. I already earn 3-400 a month through some hobby websites so I'd hope that doing it fall time I could make a reasonable living.

Personally moving abroad has no interest for me (even though my wife and son are bi-lingual!) as I think you just replace one set of problems with a whole new set. Unless of course you have a real connection / passion for the new country.

Not sure now is a good time to move to the Eurozone!

What I might do is move to a more remote part of the UK, coming from London there are plenty of places I could now move to mortgage free, this would allow one to take the risk of setting up an online business which just has to make enough to cover costs. Sounds attractive but would one be any better off?



Do they speak Lahn-dahn? You'll never fit in anywhere else. I would stay where you are. Bit like Parisians to the rest of France. You come round here pushing prices up and acting like lah-de-dah. :lol:



#85 abroad

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Posted 06 October 2011 - 01:24 PM

There is never a totally perfect time for things like this. Don't do it expecting it to make you rich financially and you won't be disappointed and you might get lucky and be surprised. There are always loads of folks that are always going to do it in a few years or would if they could but very few actually do it. You either want to or you don't. I agree it does not solve all the issues, its just a new set of different problems.

Just stay flexible and look at it as an adventure, you do need your spouse to be fully on board as their life is actually changed more than your life is as an office or factory floor is pretty similar the world over...age should not be a barrier if your head is the right way with respect to a move.

Edited by abroad, 06 October 2011 - 01:26 PM.





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