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Norway Versus Uk?


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#16 porca misèria

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Posted 06 January 2012 - 08:19 PM

Ok, I've got a decent job opportunity in Norway doing the same job as here but paying about £5k per annum more after taxes. Not a lot considering the cost of living in Oslo. However I am concerned about my kids growing up in the UK - you know why!

On the other hand I have to learn Norwegian. I've also heard that it is a very closed society and that alcohol is extremely expensive.
I love the UK, I just can't stand the retards that live here.

I am really stumped here. It is not a lot more money to live in a more expensive country. But a country with perhaps more to offer a young family (I have two young kids).

Would you move?

Have to disagree with some of the posters here. Oslo has its dark side: I've walked past druggies injecting openly there, for instance (I confess to being shocked and hurrying past). It also has its vibrant side, though your city life will be that much more limited until your Norwegian is good enough to enjoy the theatre, for instance. It wouldn't be my first choice of Norwegian city (Trondheim would, out of those I've seen) but I'd take it over London any day.

Main advantages: you're within reach of real countryside, and your rent money will get you something decent. Apart from that, the question has to be your character: whether you're up for something new, or whether you'll be forever whinging about [whatever] in the UK being better.

As for pay, I understand it's a lot flatter there than here. But you can see for yourself: Norwegians are very open about it, and there's a government website where you can see the full details of anyone's income!

#17 porca misèria

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Posted 06 January 2012 - 08:27 PM

Do you see the connection there? Maybe it's the cheap booze in the UK that creates the retards over here (it certainly causes them to act antisocially).

So expensive booze is actually a good thing.

Scandinavians have a very unhealthy relationship with booze. Including homebrew, which avoids the fearsome prices. But it's got a lot better as it's converging with other (Northern) European countries including us. My uncle used to say how immensely refreshing it was when he travelled in Germany or the UK and could just go into a bar and have a drink in a healthy social atmosphere: nowadays you'll find that even in their cities (albeit not cheap).

Amongst countries I've lived in, Italy stands out as NOT having a problem with drinking culture - no drunken-yobs scene. And Italy has cheaper booze than us, unless you buy beer in a pub!

#18 Gigantic Purple Slug

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Posted 06 January 2012 - 08:29 PM

very safe, unless you happen to have gone to a certain island and been shot with 70 others by a nutter with a rifle.


http://en.wikipedia....l_homicide_rate

Don't be swayed by the one off incident.

Norway is one of the few places in the world where I would fight a mugger.

The embarassment of telling my colleagues there that I had been mugged would be worse than the mugging itself.

#19 Trampa501

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Posted 06 January 2012 - 09:01 PM

How old are your children? If they are less than 8 or 9 years old, then they should pick up the language quite quickly - certainly faster than you. But if they're in their teens, there could be serious problems in adjusting, and you could be condemning them to fail at an important stage in life. I'm not saying it's inevitable, and you can of course hire private tutors, but it is an issue.
Pensions - work out what your entitlement will be if you work for the rest of your career in Norway. I suspect it will be a lot more, but check if you can transfer contributions already made in the UK to add to the Norwegian tally.
Also - does your better half work? Can they speak Norwegian? Will they want to get a job too - how realistic is it?
Best check the expatica type forums, I would guess..
Good luck - it sounds an excellent opportunity, but there are possible drawbacks.
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#20 ccc

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Posted 07 January 2012 - 11:04 AM

Do it. If it is shite then come back after 6 months and nothing will have changed. Nothing to lose. You should also ask for more money - again - nothing to lose.

THE END.
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#21 bearwithasorehead

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Posted 07 January 2012 - 03:31 PM

5 mins 30 seconds in

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_WD_OR26WQM


Yes, this is what I am afraid of: 'he'll be back before long. He'll miss kipper, or custard.... wildcat strikes...'

#22 TheBlueCat

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Posted 07 January 2012 - 04:22 PM

Ok, I've got a decent job opportunity in Norway doing the same job as here but paying about £5k per annum more after taxes. Not a lot considering the cost of living in Oslo. However I am concerned about my kids growing up in the UK - you know why!

On the other hand I have to learn Norwegian. I've also heard that it is a very closed society and that alcohol is extremely expensive.
I love the UK, I just can't stand the retards that live here.

I am really stumped here. It is not a lot more money to live in a more expensive country. But a country with perhaps more to offer a young family (I have two young kids).

Would you move?

You're looking at this the wrong way. Move because you think it'll be an exciting adventure, particularly for your kids. Once you're there you can figure out if you want to stay for the long term or not.

#23 blobloblob

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Posted 07 January 2012 - 05:57 PM

However, the outdoor lifestyle is done to an excellent level. Take up sailing and cross country skiing! Holidays are easy - pack a tent and drive round the country.
Here's some photos I took last time I went... http://flic.kr/s/aHsiPUqVX7


Stunningly beautiful place. I love the look of that road on this pic - Down the Trollstiggen.

#24 Gone baby gone

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Posted 07 January 2012 - 06:41 PM

Excuses, the weather is hardly worse than in the UK (certainly no worse than Scotland). Most likely they never bothered to integrate properly (didn't learn the language?) and therefore lacked social life.


I don't know where you were thinking of in Scotland, but there isn't a city or town with average temperatures of -5c and perennial heavy snowfall like Oslo has across the winter? Also, they moved to Norway from Wales, which had significantly longer hours of daylight and warmer winter temps.

As for the language, one of them was approaching fluency before they left the UK, both were fluent before they left Norway to return. They had a kid and the better half (a scientist) said she didn't rate the way that science was taught in Norway.

Great Viking ship museum though! I enjoyed my visits.

#25 Debbie568

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Posted 07 January 2012 - 11:22 PM

Excuses, the weather is hardly worse than in the UK (certainly no worse than Scotland). Most likely they never bothered to integrate properly (didn't learn the language?) and therefore lacked social life.


Scottish weather like in Norway? I don't think so. I don't think Edinburgh and snow are well acquainted at all, particularly north of the castle, near the sea. Even the rain here is pathetic. Norway: real rain, real snow, real cold. East Scotland: pretend rain, pretend snow, pretend cold.

Ben Nevis or the Cairngorms might be able to give Norway a run for it's money.

#26 RichB

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Posted 08 January 2012 - 12:16 AM

Round Oslo it was rather pleasant - very sheltered, so not the driving wind you get on the east coast of scotland, and when it got cold (deeply cold I may add - we had +37 and -35 degrees on our maxmin thermometer in 6 months) because there is little wind and the air is dry, you don't feel the cold so much.
And when you go out, you go out dressed for cold... not like scotland.

Long summer nights, gets darkish around 11:30pm for an hour or 2. Means you can whiz home after work, then have almost a whole day to go out in the woods/garden/boat etc.

#27 RichB

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Posted 08 January 2012 - 12:18 AM

Stunningly beautiful place. I love the look of that road on this pic - Down the Trollstiggen.


Yeah, you should take a trip out there, that road is quite famous, but there are many other, far more interesting roads to drive round - the Eagle Road down to Geiranger for instance: http://www.360cities...8.40,-1.20,70.0

#28 petetong

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Posted 08 January 2012 - 01:04 AM

Have to disagree with some of the posters here. Oslo has its dark side: I've walked past druggies injecting openly there, for instance (I confess to being shocked and hurrying past). It also has its vibrant side, though your city life will be that much more limited until your Norwegian is good enough to enjoy the theatre, for instance. It wouldn't be my first choice of Norwegian city (Trondheim would, out of those I've seen) but I'd take it over London any day.

Main advantages: you're within reach of real countryside, and your rent money will get you something decent. Apart from that, the question has to be your character: whether you're up for something new, or whether you'll be forever whinging about [whatever] in the UK being better.

As for pay, I understand it's a lot flatter there than here. But you can see for yourself: Norwegians are very open about it, and there's a government website where you can see the full details of anyone's income!


Isn't Oslo and Norway supposed to have the highest numbers of smack heads in Europe ? Seems to be very open in Oslo: Oslo smackheads
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