Jump to content


Photo

Good Books Forum--HPC Reading List


  • Please log in to reply
22 replies to this topic

#1 BobBobson

BobBobson

    HPC Poster

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 242 posts

Posted 31 March 2011 - 12:57 AM

What about a section in the these forems where members can list/discuss particularly good HPC relevant books that they have read.

I imagine that it would be a fairly quiet section on these forems but would prove a great resource for many who are interested in HPC related subjects.

#2 reddog

reddog

    HPC Poster

  • New Members
  • PipPip
  • 96 posts

Posted 23 April 2011 - 02:00 PM

Hello - long time lurker, first time poster, so please be gentle!

I am looking for some up to date reading on the UK economy, and in particular our debt problems.

I have read 'The Accent of Money' by Niall Ferguson, which was an interesting history, but really finishes when the current problems were starting in 2008.

I have also read 'Whoops' by John Lanchester, which I thought was a great introduction to the subject, however I thought John let himself down by pressing his own opinions at the end rather than doing an unsentimental analysis of what our insane debt levels will actually mean for the future. I also didn't agree with his conclusion that there was no option other than to bail the banks out, in my opinion capitalism should have ran its full course to avoid future moral hazard.

I am looking for a book that will explore what will happen if we keep running deficits (even of 3%, which for some reason is considered ok), and what bankruptcy will look like for this country, investment strategies for this scenario would also be welcome (please don't turn this into a goldbug thread).

Thanks

#3 BobBobson

BobBobson

    HPC Poster

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 242 posts

Posted 12 May 2011 - 12:26 AM

Seems the 'good economics book' thread got pinned.

Here are some good ones that I have read so far.

Whoops - John Lanchester
Synopsis of Housing Crash. Witty easy to understand commentary on Housing Crash with lots of emphasis on UK.

Dollar Crisis (2003) , Corruption of Capitalism (2010) (2 different books) - Richard Duncan
Fairly thorough/technical (at least for the layman) examinations of evolution of US dollar standard / modern capitalism and the crisis that we are hurtling towards. In the Dollar Crisis (in the midst of ever-increasing home equity and around the time when Gordon Brown had claimed to have put an end to 'Boom n Bust' economics), Duncan totally correctly diagnosed the very unhealthy state of the US (and thus global) economy and also predicted a real estate crash. On the back of such a proven track record in correctly diagnosing economic conditions, one must surely take great heed of what Duncan suggests in his second book. Its not all doom n gloom, as Duncan suggests some remedial measures which could be taken in order to prevent the global economy from crashing on the heels of a failed dollar standard. He also states however, that he sees absolutely no evidence or likelihood of the financial powers that be putting such remedies into practice. He states that likely events that could trigger the economic collapse could be:

A meltdown in derivatives trade
Chinese economic crash (due to inflation 'imported' from US)
Some natural disaster sending latent shockwaves into global economic system (book was published pre Fukushima)

For me, these were hard books to read but easily the best out of all the economics material that I have read.

How to buy Gold and Silver - Mike Maloney

Easy to read with lots of interesting dinner table anecdotes and examples although Mike Maloney is also guilty of treating his readers as idiots, as much of this books material amounts to his pro Gold/Silver sales pitch and this book can therefore be seen as a kind of propaganda more so than a serious exposse of the precious metals market. However, it just so happens that Maloney has been proven right for years now, so this may not be bad propaganda to buy into.

Edited by Retardstic, 12 May 2011 - 12:27 AM.


#4 SuperChimp

SuperChimp

    HPC Regular

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 779 posts
  • Location:UK

Posted 25 January 2012 - 09:46 PM

This thread is pretty old, hopefully it may get some more interest.

I wrote a book on the Euro Crisis. You can get it from the link below.



Congratulations on writing a book! B)

I may try and read it, but it looks a bit complicated for a layman like myself.

A book I have read recently is:

Paper Money Collapse by Detlev S. Schlichter. The book covers a lot of old ground and any followers of the Austrian economic school will have read much of it before but I really enjoyed it.

If you just type Detlev Schlichter into YouTube there are some good interviews that quickly explain his ideas. :)

#5 AC44

AC44

    HPC Poster

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 235 posts

Posted 31 January 2012 - 03:00 PM

Treasure Island book by Nicholas Shaxson.

Very good information about how offshore centre were created, by who and how they are still supported by financial centres (And their impact on the economy in different countries). Very interesting.

Since then when I hear about London City Corporation, I can understand what it all means..

#6 Garf

Garf

    HPC Poster

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 249 posts

Posted 05 March 2012 - 10:44 AM

I've just discovered a book called Capital.... No. Not that one....

This one is a novel by John Lanchester about people living in "Pepys Road" London:
http://www.amazon.co...f_rd_i=468294#_

I'm enjoying the first section, which is available for review on amazon:

"... history had sprung an astonishing plot twist on the residents of Pepys Road. For the first time in history, the people who lived in the street were, by global and maybe even by local standards, rich. The thing which made them rich was the very fact that they lived in Pepys Road. They were rich simply because of that, because all of the houses in Pepys Road, as if by magic, were now worth millions of pounds."

This Lanchester chap may be the first HPC novelist... Bless!

Edited by Garf, 05 March 2012 - 10:47 AM.


#7 Garf

Garf

    HPC Poster

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 249 posts

Posted 12 March 2012 - 10:34 PM

Presentation to authors@google by David Graeber, author of DEBT: The First 5,000 Years

!

#8 SuperChimp

SuperChimp

    HPC Regular

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 779 posts
  • Location:UK

Posted 04 May 2012 - 04:21 PM

I want to recommend:

A Very English Deceit: The Secret History of the South Sea Bubble and the First Great Financial Scandal by Malcolm Balen

I find some books about economic history quite boring but this is a great read, especially as it is a about a period of British history I did not know that much about.

Attached File  south_sea_bubble.jpg   53.58KB   3 downloads

I am currently looking out for a decent book on the Industrial Revolution in England. I have read a couple in the past but found them quite heavy going.

Or a book about the DotCom bubble in the early 2000s.

Any recommendations?

#9 MEtallic

MEtallic

    HPC Poster

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 202 posts

Posted 20 May 2012 - 05:43 PM

Richard Duncan's 'The New Depression- Breakdown of the Paper Money Economy' is a great read. It follows on from his 'Dollar Collapse' which for me helped explain why asset prices, e.g house prices, appeared to be for ever rising prior to 2007.

He makes a key point- without massive injections of government spending and actions to bail out the banks in 2008, we would now be in the middle of another Depression even greater than the 1930-and look how well that ended! I, like most others on the forum, understand that the world financial system is a mess and equally, dislike the idea of supporting gambling dens banks, but it appears that unless governments injects large amounts of newly printed cash, prior to developing a system that isn't so broken, we will inevitably face an economic collapse of Biblical proportions.

I may well get negative responses to this, but please read both his books first before commenting.

#10 Giordano Bruno

Giordano Bruno

    HPC Veteran

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 2,023 posts

Posted 20 May 2012 - 06:13 PM

Richard Duncan's 'The New Depression- Breakdown of the Paper Money Economy' is a great read. It follows on from his 'Dollar Collapse' which for me helped explain why asset prices, e.g house prices, appeared to be for ever rising prior to 2007.

He makes a key point- without massive injections of government spending and actions to bail out the banks in 2008, we would now be in the middle of another Depression even greater than the 1930-and look how well that ended! I, like most others on the forum, understand that the world financial system is a mess and equally, dislike the idea of supporting gambling dens banks, but it appears that unless governments injects large amounts of newly printed cash, prior to developing a system that isn't so broken, we will inevitably face an economic collapse of Biblical proportions.

I may well get negative responses to this, but please read both his books first before commenting.

I was going to joke 'And, of course, you have no connection to Richard Duncan. :)' but it's not that funny. I checked Amazon and it's on Kindle but at £11.69! WTF! I really think there is something wrong with kindle pricing. :blink:

----------------- ********************** -----------------


Regarding QE I think that Fiat Money Inflation in France is worth a read.

Property prices only ever go up ... except, of course, when they stay the same or when they come down.

You can go wrong with bricks and mortar.

The banksters need their lovely fat bonuses. The taxpayer has to pay.
Never mind, Taxpayer. Think of it as an exercise in generosity.

Profits will be privatized and losses will be socialized. - Thanks a bunch!

For educated opinion on the Kercher murder case, please read 'Injustice in Perugia' by Bruce Fisher and 'The Monster of Perugia' by Mark Waterbury.
RIP Meredith Kercher.

Friends of Amanda Knox

#11 Timhm

Timhm

    HPC Poster

  • New Members
  • PipPip
  • 70 posts

Posted 20 May 2012 - 08:55 PM

He makes a key point- without massive injections of government spending and actions to bail out the banks in 2008, we would now be in the middle of another Depression even greater than the 1930-and look how well that ended!

For the benefit of those of us who don't have the book(s) to hand, would you mind summarising how he justifies this point please? Granted, from what I understand the governments of the time didn't handle the Great Depression very well, but that doesn't necessarily mean we have to choose between their option and his. And what about Iceland? They told everyone to go fornicate with themselves and last I heard they were doing ok.


I, like most others on the forum, understand that the world financial system is a mess and equally, dislike the idea of supporting gambling dens banks, but it appears that unless governments injects large amounts of newly printed cash, prior to developing a system that isn't so broken, we will inevitably face an economic collapse of Biblical proportions.

Again it depends how he justifies it, but at least the political classes in the 1930s actually learnt something (referring to Glass-Steagal here). Today, it seems like we're going through all this just to maintain the status quo or worse, impoverishing everyone else.

#12 jaspers

jaspers

    HPC Regular

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 999 posts
  • Location:North Yorks

Posted 20 May 2012 - 09:04 PM

Alternatively give Irving another read…

http://fraser.stloui...er/fisdeb33.pdf
Seven Deadly Social Sins: Politics without Principle. Wealth without work. Commerce without morality. Pleasure without Conscience. Education without Character. Science without Humanity. Worship without Sacrifice. --Mohandas K. Gandhi (1869-1948)

#13 okaycuckoo

okaycuckoo

    I live on HPC!

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 8,535 posts

Posted 20 May 2012 - 09:29 PM

There's a good argument that the depression was made worse by government intervention.

People take the example of the early 1920s when there was a big liquidation event - ecomony grew again after 18 months.

edit: Misspelling through tiredness - go to sleep, cuckoo. go to sleep.

Edited by okaycuckoo, 20 May 2012 - 09:30 PM.


#14 KingBingo

KingBingo

    HPC Senior Veteran

  • New Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,120 posts
  • Location:London

Posted 20 May 2012 - 09:38 PM

but it appears that unless governments injects large amounts of newly printed cash, prior to developing a system that isn't so broken, we will inevitably face an economic collapse of Biblical proportions.



Your better off reading Schiff and Hayek.

A depression is what we ARE getting. If we had collapse/default/reset it would be like when that has occurred many times before, recently Iceland & Argentina, i.e. 2/3 years tough times, then back again to productive economies with all the fax-production cleared away.

It sounds like this guy is just a cheerleader for central planning in money, the cause of the problems in the first place.

Try these:
http://www.amazon.co...37549847&sr=8-3
http://www.amazon.co...37549865&sr=1-1
The truth is that the economies of rich countries, including the UK, are being kept alive by another and astonishingly under-reported bull market — in government debt. This is the bond bubble; and when it bursts, as it surely will, the result will be a recession far deeper than the crash from which we are trying to recover.

Allister Heath
17 September 2011

#15 wonderpup

wonderpup

    I live on HPC!

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 9,876 posts

Posted 20 May 2012 - 11:48 PM

prior to developing a system that isn't so broken


Propping up the bankers is making sure this never happens- they like the system the way it is right now- and- thanks to the bailouts- they have the money to purchase the policymakers.

The one chance for real change was when the bankers were on their knees begging for state bailouts- but that opportunity was missed.

All we have left now is a slow march into global insolvency as the zombie banks feed off fake printed money and remain just strong enough to block any real change.




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users