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Planning Permission changes -commercial to residential


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#1 Timm

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Posted 18 March 2011 - 07:44 PM

Some serious flaws to it, but so far there seems to be quite an unusual spin on it.

Could this be the first wave of popular anti-planning re-education on behalf of the coalition?
Less credit - more money.

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#2 Dave Beans

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Posted 19 March 2011 - 02:23 AM

http://www.bbc.co.uk...siness-12792614

The Government is set to announce measures in the Budget to make it easier for companies in England to convert commercial property into private dwellings.

The BBC has learned that soon planning permission would no longer be required by developers. The government says this should result in up to 250,000 additional houses or flats being created. The plan would require changes to existing legislation. The new rules could be in place before the end of the year.

They would not apply to shops. Government sources said the changes, which are expected to be announced next Wednesday, could save £140m in red tape over 10 years.

The plan has been welcomed by the British Property Federation. Last year, some 129,000 new housing units were built in England. That is the lowest peacetime figure since 1923. Almost 10% of commercial properties currently lie vacant.


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#3 MongerOfDoom

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Posted 19 March 2011 - 02:39 AM

http://www.bbc.co.uk...siness-12792614



According to this link there are approx 30000 house-building starts a quarter, so 250k would be about a 2 years worth. Unfortunately, estimates based on rumored government policy very rarely turn out to have any accuracy whatsoever :-( Still, it would be excellent bear food if true.

http://www.propertyc...t-uk-homes.html

#4 Dave Beans

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Posted 19 March 2011 - 02:49 AM

According to this link there are approx 30000 house-building starts a quarter, so 250k would be about a 2 years worth. Unfortunately, estimates based on rumored government policy very rarely turn out to have any accuracy whatsoever :-( Still, it would be excellent bear food if true.

http://www.propertyc...t-uk-homes.html


Living on an industrial estate would be interesting...loud during the day, normally when your out, but quiet in the evenings..

Edited by Dave Beans, 19 March 2011 - 02:49 AM.

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#5 The Masked Tulip

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Posted 19 March 2011 - 04:05 AM

http://www.bbc.co.uk...siness-12792614

It does not apply to shops so I am not sure what commercial property they are thinking could be converted to houses & flats? B&Bs? Hotels? Is a restaurant a shop?


The Government is set to announce measures in the Budget to make it easier for companies in England to convert commercial property into private dwellings.

The BBC has learned that soon planning permission would no longer be required by developers.

The government says this should result in up to 250,000 additional houses or flats being created.

The plan would require changes to existing legislation.

The new rules could be in place before the end of the year.

They would not apply to shops.

Vacant properties

Government sources said the changes, which are expected to be announced next Wednesday, could save £140m in red tape over 10 years.

The plan has been welcomed by the British Property Federation.

Last year, some 129,000 new housing units were built in England.

That is the lowest peacetime figure since 1923.

Almost 10% of commercial properties currently lie vacant.


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#6 Harold Bishop

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Posted 19 March 2011 - 04:13 AM

I suppose it will come down to what a commercial building is. Apart from the obvious empty office block or industrial building, how about a closed village pub ? To date most end up closing and the owners often spend years trying to get change of use to residential. Same with uneconomical village shops. Are these commercial ? I doubt it. Also, there is a nice little piece of agricultural land near me for sale with a farm building on it. Is that commercial ? I doubt it.

I suspect there will be a very narrow definition of what is commercial and there will still be all sorts of planning details to overcome.

#7 mentholist

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Posted 19 March 2011 - 05:07 AM

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-12792614


So our "rebalancing" involves ridding the country of more productive space?

You want more decent housing. Release greenbelt and lots of it.

#8 Kyoto

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Posted 19 March 2011 - 06:00 AM

Relaxing planning rules in this way is obviously great from a HPC perspective, but it's a shame that you might see more character buildings and local businesses chopped up and sold off to BTL spivs in the process.


House Prices are wholly dictated by the amount of money people can borrow. Everything else, notably 'supply and demand' is a rounding error in comparison.

#9 Dave Spart

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Posted 19 March 2011 - 07:08 AM

So our "rebalancing" involves ridding the country of more productive space?

You want more decent housing. Release greenbelt and lots of it.


I'm not against releasing some green belt if its done throughtfully but when does that process stop? When is enough enough? Until there's none left? Not everyone who supports the idea of the green belt has a vested interest in property.

In the tiny island state of Singapore (half the size of London, population 5.5m), the number of open spaces seem to be dwindling to such an extent they are reclaiming land from the sea. They were even contemplating at one point cutting down all the trees on Orchard Road (to make room for more businesses) - the very thing which, blended with the modern, makes the place such a good tourist draw.

Try building upwards, not outwards. The UK is peppered with plenty of failed urban-sprawl cities, why not demolish the worst in their entirety and renew them with something more intelligent? Cos the UK is bust cos it invested in the past and not the future. <_<

Edited by Dave Spart, 19 March 2011 - 07:12 AM.

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#10 cartimandua51

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Posted 19 March 2011 - 07:17 AM

http://www.bbc.co.uk...siness-12792614

It does not apply to shops so I am not sure what commercial property they are thinking could be converted to houses & flats? B&Bs? Hotels? Is a restaurant a shop?




Assuming that factories count as manufacturing, rather than commercial, I would assume they are talking about things like 60s office blocks which are unlikely to cause much weeping among conservationists!
Perhaps some warehouses, disused petrol stations etc
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#11 mentholist

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Posted 19 March 2011 - 07:28 AM

I'm not against releasing some green belt if its done throughtfully but when does that process stop? When is enough enough? Until there's none left? Not everyone who supports the idea of the green belt has a vested interest in property.

In the tiny island state of Singapore (half the size of London, population 5.5m), the number of open spaces seem to be dwindling to such an extent they are reclaiming land from the sea. They were even contemplating at one point cutting down all the trees on Orchard Road (to make room for more businesses) - the very thing which, blended with the modern, makes the place such a good tourist draw.

Try building upwards, not outwards. The UK is peppered with plenty of failed urban-sprawl cities, why not demolish the worst in their entirety and renew them with something more intelligent? Cos the UK is bust cos it invested in the past and not the future. <_<


You're preaching to the almost converted. It just strikes me that if already occupied space is used up by residential property rather than commerce you simply shift the problem away from supply on the residential side to supply on the commercial side.

Personally I'd prefer to protect greenbelt by pursuing a stable or slowly declining population policy. Thus would help with energy management and a whole host of infrastructure related issues. But no what we need is immigration and growth at all costs apparently.

As for high density housing. It can be done but not everyone wants to live like this. My father paid 3 x his wages for a semi (oo-Er) with a garden big enough to swing a cat in. Similar new build structures now cost 7-8x average wages here and are crammed in due to profit maximisation and planning restrictions.

#12 porca misèria

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Posted 19 March 2011 - 07:39 AM

Living on an industrial estate would be interesting...loud during the day, normally when your out, but quiet in the evenings..

My parents used to live next door to light industry. Lovely house, converted from what was originally servants quarters behind a posh crescent. Being retired, they were in during the day. They were happy there.

Then the site got redeveloped to flats. Yuppies moved in. The noise became more annoying, and no time in the 24 hours was free of it. Parents moved out, ended up in a horrible little shoebox where they live now :( .

#13 porca misèria

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Posted 19 March 2011 - 07:42 AM

Love to know if this extends to old agricultural buildings. That could give us something new but not-necessarily-depressing in rural areas. And a huge gift to farmers is in-character for any UK government.

#14 frenchy

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Posted 19 March 2011 - 07:50 AM

I'm not against releasing some green belt if its done throughtfully but when does that process stop? When is enough enough? Until there's none left? Not everyone who supports the idea of the green belt has a vested interest in property.

In the tiny island state of Singapore (half the size of London, population 5.5m), the number of open spaces seem to be dwindling to such an extent they are reclaiming land from the sea. They were even contemplating at one point cutting down all the trees on Orchard Road (to make room for more businesses) - the very thing which, blended with the modern, makes the place such a good tourist draw.

Try building upwards, not outwards. The UK is peppered with plenty of failed urban-sprawl cities, why not demolish the worst in their entirety and renew them with something more intelligent? Cos the UK is bust cos it invested in the past and not the future. <_<


I think Singapore example is especially poor, sorry. For the UK to reach Singapore's population density you would need 1.7billion British people...
A very small percentage (single digit, ~6%) of the UK is built on, how much green belt do you need?

#15 OnlyMe

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Posted 19 March 2011 - 08:06 AM

I think Singapore example is especially poor, sorry. For the UK to reach Singapore's population density you would need 1.7billion British people...
A very small percentage (single digit, ~6%) of the UK is built on, how much green belt do you need?



Apparently enough for the poeple who already live near or on it.
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