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Big Rise In Completed Property Sales


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#76 LondonToManchester

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Posted 14 May 2009 - 03:41 PM

I think we may have been here before, but most of us have lived through at least one major recession on here. Things get pretty bad, and house prices do not go up in recessions. Your positive thinking is great, but you're making yourself look pretty foolish at times, which undermines any valid points you have to make.

I understand how you amy be worried about losing money on your properties, but as long as you keep your job and they are long term 'investments' then I don't know why you are bothered either way.


Trying to find the bottom so I can buy more.

Your right about one thing though I don't care about the value of my current properties I NEVER plan on selling them.
Prices will fall but then they will go sky high.

Better to roll the dice and lose then never to roll the dice!

Never ever ever Sell property!

#77 the end is a bit nigher

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Posted 14 May 2009 - 03:43 PM

Trying to find the bottom so I can buy more.

Your right about one thing though I don't care about the value of my current properties I NEVER plan on selling them.

I see you have posted again, yet despite posting a couple of insults earlier about not understanding equations, you have STILL failed to post an answer to my earlier question.

Please give your definition of DEMAND and how it is derived in the property market.

At the moment you are running scared.
Ok, we were right all along. It doesn't make the resulting outcome any less uncomfortable though.

Gold is a metal, not a currency. Gold is denominated in dollars. It's price in other currencies is related to the dollar exchange rate with those currencies.

Nothing I have stated above should be taken as financial advice as I am not qualified or authorised to provide financial advice other than to myself

#78 Jim B.

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Posted 14 May 2009 - 03:45 PM

Trying to find the bottom so I can buy more.


OK, well just remember, the bottom won't be a weekend, or even a month, there is no panic. Look at the graphs of the last crash. We are nowhere near there yet considering the state the country is in. Prices will hit bottom and then rumble along the bottom for months, it's not like they are suddenly going to shoot up. When you ahve small rises for more than 3 months on a trot we MAY have hit bottom.

ETA - Any landlord would be mad to buy now, the market is flooded with rental property. Who are you going to let to?

Edited by Jim B., 14 May 2009 - 03:47 PM.


#79 angrypirate

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Posted 14 May 2009 - 03:50 PM

Trying to find the bottom so I can buy more.

Your right about one thing though I don't care about the value of my current properties I NEVER plan on selling them.

If you are trying to buy more, are you the type of bull who is selfish that barges FTBs out of the markets??

Silly question - of course you are

I wish property wasnt viewed as investments. Its the whole reason why we are in this mess

#80 angrypirate

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Posted 14 May 2009 - 03:50 PM

Trying to find the bottom so I can buy more.

Your right about one thing though I don't care about the value of my current properties I NEVER plan on selling them.

If you are trying to buy more, are you the type of bull who is selfish that barges FTBs out of the markets??

Silly question - of course you are

I wish property wasnt viewed as investments. Its the whole reason why we are in this mess

#81 angrypirate

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Posted 14 May 2009 - 03:52 PM

If you are trying to buy more, are you the type of bull who is selfish that barges FTBs out of the markets??

Silly question - of course you are

I wish property wasnt viewed as investments. Its the whole reason why we are in this mess

Is there an echo in here?

#82 tomwatkins

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Posted 14 May 2009 - 03:56 PM

Trying to find the bottom so I can buy more.

Your right about one thing though I don't care about the value of my current properties I NEVER plan on selling them.


I hope you're not really a Mancunian are you? I just noticed some of the pearls of wisdom from your sign in page "better to roll the dice and lose than never to roll the dice" or something like that. Now that is the dumbest piece of advice I have ever seen on here. What does it mean? Does it mean better to give the house your money at MGM Grand, rather than walk away and have a nice meal, take your wife to a show and come back feeling happy? Am I missing something? Who actually said that pearl of wisdom-a Kamakazi pilot?

#83 LondonToManchester

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Posted 14 May 2009 - 04:02 PM

I see you have posted again, yet despite posting a couple of insults earlier about not understanding equations, you have STILL failed to post an answer to my earlier question.

Please give your definition of DEMAND and how it is derived in the property market.

At the moment you are running scared.


Demand how much something is wanted / needed

Demand in housing is different in the fact that EVERYONE (excluding homeless people) needs somewhere to live. Because of that there will always be a level of demand for housing (rented or home owners).

Demand can rise and fall for a whole bunch of reasons such as more people having families or more people deciding to leave an area.

As demand increases so does the price!
Prices will fall but then they will go sky high.

Better to roll the dice and lose then never to roll the dice!

Never ever ever Sell property!

#84 LondonToManchester

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Posted 14 May 2009 - 04:03 PM

I hope you're not really a Mancunian are you? I just noticed some of the pearls of wisdom from your sign in page "better to roll the dice and lose than never to roll the dice" or something like that. Now that is the dumbest piece of advice I have ever seen on here. What does it mean? Does it mean better to give the house your money at MGM Grand, rather than walk away and have a nice meal, take your wife to a show and come back feeling happy? Am I missing something? Who actually said that pearl of wisdom-a Kamakazi pilot?


Born and bred mate went to burnage high school, umist and support MANU :)
Prices will fall but then they will go sky high.

Better to roll the dice and lose then never to roll the dice!

Never ever ever Sell property!

#85 Bruce Banner

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Posted 14 May 2009 - 04:05 PM

HM Revenue and Customs reported that completed property sales leapt by 40% between February and March.

Again from the BBC




SO much for silly bears saying properties were SSTC but then comming back onto the market!



Sorry guys i have to do is again :)


AWOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOGA


Bears are the new sheeple LOL :)


You remind me of Rizo. ;)

Whatever happened to Rizo? :lol:







See below.
.



----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Lest there be any doubt.

No I believe prices will fall and am astounded that a so called Conservative led government could act in such a stupid way. As you can see from today, there are 2,000 HtB applicants and it has been on MSM none stop all day and they make up about 3.5% of a typical months mortgages.

BTL is a good potential way to bankruptcy and yes sometimes I make points to hopefully make people think.


#86 LondonToManchester

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Posted 14 May 2009 - 04:06 PM

If you are trying to buy more, are you the type of bull who is selfish that barges FTBs out of the markets??

Silly question - of course you are

I wish property wasnt viewed as investments. Its the whole reason why we are in this mess


I really don't care about FTB or people priced out (Should work abit harder IMO). I like them when they will pay my mortgage on rented properties.

I don't make the rules I just play by them :)
Prices will fall but then they will go sky high.

Better to roll the dice and lose then never to roll the dice!

Never ever ever Sell property!

#87 the end is a bit nigher

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Posted 14 May 2009 - 04:10 PM

Demand how much something is wanted / needed

That is EXACTLY what demand isn't. Is has absolutely nothing to do with want or need. You clearly didn't do basic economics and have now confirmed yourself to be as naive as we thought you were.

And increased volume does not necessarily mean increased price.
Ok, we were right all along. It doesn't make the resulting outcome any less uncomfortable though.

Gold is a metal, not a currency. Gold is denominated in dollars. It's price in other currencies is related to the dollar exchange rate with those currencies.

Nothing I have stated above should be taken as financial advice as I am not qualified or authorised to provide financial advice other than to myself

#88 FallingKnife

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Posted 14 May 2009 - 04:12 PM

Born and bred mate went to burnage high school, umist and support MANU :)


"MANU" ???? That's what all the top Reds call them I hear ;)

BTW - you're wrong about demand. Really wrong.
"The big wheel keeps on turning, on a simple line, day by day"

#89 othello

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Posted 14 May 2009 - 04:16 PM

Good news - in order for the market to discover the correct price of the assets, transactions have to take place in sufficient volume.

The somewhat 'frozen market' of recent times has been hindering price discovery - ie. tending to support higher prices. Once it unfreezes to some degree we can see prices start to fall to sustainable levels.

Looks like we have someone else to laugh at - Sibley and Hamish were getting lonely being the focus for ridicule. :lol:


You have made a crucial point that I think a lot of people have not appreciated. I am fully expecting to see more widespread falls, including those relating to more desirable properties, when the market starts to unfreeze. Supply and demand is going to remain very much leaning hard over on the supply side even when transaction levels rise.
We are becoming a nation of debt slaves, our short lives are bubbles in the champagne of the banking corporations. Don't blame the banks though, they just lend us what we want to borrow.

#90 tomwatkins

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Posted 14 May 2009 - 04:21 PM

Born and bred mate went to burnage high school, umist and support MANU :)

Well mate I am a Red since the days of the Babes but I can't excuse you because of that. Now if you said you were a City fan it would explain a lot. Having said that, why do you think it's a good move to make a bad bet? My own experience in property is bad (through circumstances that's all). You can guess my age (BTW I am RICS so I am semi-educated in the market). I have never been an "investor" and had to move to various parts of the North West that coincided with job moves. I had no choice but I never "timed" it right. A house was somewhere to live which is sensible IMHO. The bottom line is that I cannot believe that anybody would not grasp that an economy that relies on people (of the same nationality) swapping money and bidding on assets that have a proven record of extreme volatility is bad in the long-term. For every winner there is a loser. You are not adding one penny to real growth in a sustainable way. It's false short-terminism.

I am just waiting for the time when renters are viewed as the smart guys in the room-not the losers. It will come my friend. How do I know?-because I have seen it three times already in my lifetime. A lot of dead bodies along the way.




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