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Ash4781

Heatwave

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Blimey it was hot one today! It's expected to be 25 degrees Celsius overnight where I am. Any coping strategies? I moved the mattress downstairs because in the bedroom the thermometer read 32 degrees. It's only 25 degrees down here with the fans running!

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I'm staying in The Worst Hotel in Hitchin (and that's up against some seriously stiff competition) on the hottest night of the year with no aircon, no fan, no net curtains and a room overlooking a mozzie-infested pool. Only two options: a night of constant tossing and cold showers; or a night of torment by a thousand nibbles. Which to choose?

 

 

IMG_0823.JPG

Edited by RentingForever

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This weather is a good reason to move North.  I have never particularly liked hot weather and as I get older I become less tolerant of it.

Edited by dougless

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Not complaining, we know short bursts of exceptionally hot weather happens from time to time, make the most of it. Lack or shortage of fresh water would be a much bigger problem.;)

Edited by winkie

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It is staggeringly hot (for the UK) at the moment. The SE is just abominable.

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As soon as the temperature drops below the room temperature then start fanning outside air in. You need an electric fan really.

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20 hours ago, Ash4781 said:

Blimey it was hot one today! It's expected to be 25 degrees Celsius overnight where I am. Any coping strategies? I moved the mattress downstairs because in the bedroom the thermometer read 32 degrees. It's only 25 degrees down here with the fans running!

Air conditioning. Even a portable unit with a "trunk" should enable you to get a good night's sleep. Money well spent.

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For next year, I'm getting one of those external units with two internal fan things.

. 26 degrees inside is just stupid. I have tin foil on the bedroom windows and those windscreen foil covers taped on a large set of Windows downstairs. That makes a big difference 

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1 hour ago, Bruce Banner said:

Air conditioning. Even a portable unit with a "trunk" should enable you to get a good night's sleep. Money well spent.

Cheers. I see a few retailers sell an odd in between product referred to as an air cooler which blows air over water or ice (you have to add it manually).

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38 minutes ago, Ash4781 said:

Cheers. I see a few retailers sell an odd in between product referred to as an air cooler which blows air over water or ice (you have to add it manually).

Just buy an ordinary fan and stick a bowl of water with ice cubes in front of it.

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1 hour ago, Ash4781 said:

Cheers. I see a few retailers sell an odd in between product referred to as an air cooler which blows air over water or ice (you have to add it manually).

Not the same thing at all. A proper air conditioner has a compressor with evaporator and condenser coils and cools and de-humidifies the air, with the condensed water being collected in a container that needs emptying, the de-humidification adds to the comfort level as much as the cooling on a hot humid night. Those air cooler thingies add to the humidity which is not what you want on a hot humid night.

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22 hours ago, RentingForever said:

Only two options: a night of constant tossing and cold showers; or a night of torment by a thousand nibbles. Which to choose?

 

 

IMG_0823.JPG

Wearing boxing gloves in bed should stop that constant tossing..

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Hang wet sheets across the windows for evaporative cooling. Sleep out in the garden.

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14 hours ago, Bruce Banner said:

Not the same thing at all. A proper air conditioner has a compressor with evaporator and condenser coils and cools and de-humidifies the air, with the condensed water being collected in a container that needs emptying, the de-humidification adds to the comfort level as much as the cooling on a hot humid night. Those air cooler thingies add to the humidity which is not what you want on a hot humid night.

^^ This ^^

We are mammals, and naked ones at that, not reptiles.

We cool ourselves by evaporation of our sweat. This works because the evaporation of any liquid (such as sweat) requires heat. When a liquid evaporates, it takes this heat from itself and whatever it is in contact with. In the case of sweat, that would be one's skin.

If you increase the humidity of your environment, you compromise your ability to cool yourself. This is because you limit the ability of your sweat to evaporate. For any air temperature, the air can only hold a certain percentage of water as vapour. If the percentage of water as vapour rises above this level, it will simply condense on surfaces. In condensing it will give back the energy it took on evaporation. For any air temperature and humidity, there will in fact be an equilibrium between water evaporating and condensing back on surfaces. Shift the amount of water vapour in the air higher, and the equilibrium will be disrupted and more condensing will occur until th equilibrium is restored.

In other words, if you make your surroundings more humid, expect more condensing of water vapour onto your skin - and therefore reduced cooling.

Evaporation is the key. For that you need dry air and a good flow of it over your skin.

That's why breezes feel cool. It's why "dry heat" is more bearable than humidity.

As for dampening your bed clothes, the best thing about this is it will make your bed so uncomfortably clammy that you'll realize the garden lawn ain't such a bad option , feral foxes and all.

Edited by Sledgehead

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4 hours ago, Sledgehead said:

^^ This ^^

We are mammals, and naked ones at that, not reptiles.

We cool ourselves by evaporation of our sweat. This works because the evaporation of any liquid (such as sweat) requires heat. When a liquid evaporates, it takes this heat from itself and whatever it is in contact with. In the case of sweat, that would be one's skin.

If you increase the humidity of your environment, you compromise your ability to cool yourself. This is because you limit the ability of your sweat to evaporate. For any air temperature, the air can only hold a certain percentage of water as vapour. If the percentage of water as vapour rises above this level, it will simply condense on surfaces. In condensing it will give back the energy it took on evaporation. For any air temperature and humidity, there will in fact be an equilibrium between water evaporating and condensing back on surfaces. Shift the amount of water vapour in the air higher, and the equilibrium will be disrupted and more condensing will occur until th equilibrium is restored.

In other words, if you make your surroundings more humid, expect more condensing of water vapour onto your skin - and therefore reduced cooling.

Evaporation is the key. For that you need dry air and a good flow of it over your skin.

That's why breezes feel cool. It's why "dry heat" is more bearable than humidity.

As for dampening your bed clothes, the best thing about this is it will make your bed so uncomfortably clammy that you'll realize the garden lawn ain't such a bad option , feral foxes and all.

Don't suffer from heat trouble these days I am quite a bit fitter and slimmer than I was thirty years ago and after climbing a few mountains with a heavy rucksack at a gallop I get used to being overly hot.

 However, in my unfit younger days I used to throw cold water on myself at night only to find that a few minutes later I was twice as hot...so your comments make sense.

 

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As someone currently blowing up like a beachball due to a knee injury and comfort drinking i can confirm carrying extra weight makes a huge difference in the hot weather.

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6 minutes ago, thisisthisitmaybe said:

As someone currently blowing up like a beachball due to a knee injury and comfort drinking i can confirm carrying extra weight makes a huge difference in the hot weather.

I tore my cartilage three weeks ago after a bad fall off a high hedge gardening,  couldn't extend my leg and was limping badly. Saw the specialist last week who told me to get walking distance and extend the knee through the pain and crunching. Really has healed quickly since and I did go on a 15 mile hike with the heavy rucksack yesterday and today in the heat.

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Quote

 

I spent 15 years in Japan with temperatures of up to 40 c but with dreadfully high humidity.

I`ll never complain.

Edited by council dweller

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1 hour ago, crashmonitor said:

I tore my cartilage three weeks ago after a bad fall off a high hedge gardening,  couldn't extend my leg and was limping badly. Saw the specialist last week who told me to get walking distance and extend the knee through the pain and crunching. Really has healed quickly since and I did go on a 15 mile hike with the heavy rucksack yesterday and today in the heat.

I cant believe you actually tore your catillage unless you are the hardest man in the universe and ace the sas selection programme without breaking sweat.

Which you could well be!

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