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Robots to replace bricklayers over the next few years

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Yes, technical redundancy...get used to that phrase, it will define the next 20 years.

 

Professional drivers be ware; UBER is just the start.

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TBH the logistics of a robot bricklayer/builder to cover all aspects of the jobs connotations e.g. location/space/irregular walls/repairs etc is some way off if at all.

I would think it far more likely that most building  (as they are already starting to now) will be limited to pre-fabricated blocks on frames, that indeed could be more easily constructed by an automated process.

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15 minutes ago, Roman Roady said:

Yes, technical redundancy...get used to that phrase, it will define the next 20 years.

 

Professional drivers be ware; UBER is just the start.

There is some shocking statistic about the number of people in the USA working in the trucking/logistics industry (ie loads).

You can imagine automated trucks on huge motorways being viable before automated city cars.

Edited by Fromage Frais

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I think this is the same thing as in a number of industries.

The donkey work, the lowest skilled part and the simplest part of the job is starting to get automated. However, there are parts of many skilled jobs that remain extremely difficult to automate, and are likely to for the forseeable future. In the case of the brickie, corners, bays, lintels, etc. are likely to be substantially more difficult to automate and are going to remain the domain of the craftsman.

So, we see greater levels of specialisation in trades, who work a higher proportion of their time at the difficult parts of the job, whereas the menial parts get automated.

We've already seen this in other fields of business and office work. The drudge work of calculating the payroll is automated, and the more difficult bit of making sure everyone is getting the correct salary, correct bonus/commission/pension/etc. 

The problem which we are already seeing in some cases, is that it increases the barrier to changing job, and can increase the learning curve for new skills, because the bread-and-butter of the apprentice and novice have been automated, so they must instead learn on the more difficult skills.

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There will be more industrial change due to technology in the next 20 years than there has been in the last 400 years according to Gerd Leonhard. Buckle up!

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15 hours ago, ChumpusRex said:

I think this is the same thing as in a number of industries.

The donkey work, the lowest skilled part and the simplest part of the job is starting to get automated. However, there are parts of many skilled jobs that remain extremely difficult to automate, and are likely to for the forseeable future. In the case of the brickie, corners, bays, lintels, etc. are likely to be substantially more difficult to automate and are going to remain the domain of the craftsman.

So, we see greater levels of specialisation in trades, who work a higher proportion of their time at the difficult parts of the job, whereas the menial parts get automated.

We've already seen this in other fields of business and office work. The drudge work of calculating the payroll is automated, and the more difficult bit of making sure everyone is getting the correct salary, correct bonus/commission/pension/etc. 

The problem which we are already seeing in some cases, is that it increases the barrier to changing job, and can increase the learning curve for new skills, because the bread-and-butter of the apprentice and novice have been automated, so they must instead learn on the more difficult skills.

+1

and it also makes the learning of new more difficult skills less worthwhile as tomorrow those more difficult jobs can just as easily disappear as well - plus increasing competition for them.

Edited by billybong

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2 hours ago, billybong said:

+1

and it also makes the learning of new more difficult skills less worthwhile as tomorrow those more difficult jobs can just as easily disappear as well - plus increasing competition for them.

We may also change the design of new homes to suit automation so that these craft skills are not needed. 

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On 21/04/2017 at 4:32 PM, sideysid said:

TBH the logistics of a robot bricklayer/builder to cover all aspects of the jobs connotations e.g. location/space/irregular walls/repairs etc is some way off if at all.

I would think it far more likely that most building  (as they are already starting to now) will be limited to pre-fabricated blocks on frames, that indeed could be more easily constructed by an automated process.

I agree with this, setting up the robot each time for a wall of bricks seems more trouble than it is worth.  Why not just deliver the house in kit form from a factory like some other countries have been doing for years (in the case of this US company the brick work is only for cosmetic reasons anyway).

 

One video on the automation side that i saw recently which is more significant is:

https://www.google.ch/amp/www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-4401108/amp/Meet-Little-Orange-robot-warehouse-worker-China.html

 

Around the Midlands in about the last 20 years, apart from public sector the main job growth seems to be in warehousing and 'logistics', it seems like this field could be almost completely automated with the robots actually doing a better job.  Ironically politicians have been banging on for years about us needing lots of low skilled immigration to do this work, what will happen to these people when they are not needed?

 

Edited by reddog

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