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Inflation Website

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I don't know if this one has been discussed? I have nothing to do with this site, BUT it looks pretty good. I was looking for the cost of the TV licence and the uptake number, but found this instead (thanks "punter").

http://www.inflationarypressure.com

You can even check the inflation of Butter, over the years. Have fun.

Graph%20of%20price%20of%20House%20Prices%20against%20Council%20Tax%20showing%20inflation.png

Edited by MrTReturns

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Here are some interesting charts:

Graph%20of%20price%20of%20Average%20Earnings%20Index%20against%20House%20Prices%20showing%20inflation.png

Graph%20of%20price%20of%20Water%20Rates%20against%20House%20Prices%20showing%20inflation.png

Graph%20of%20price%20of%20Housing%20Rent%20against%20Average%20Earnings%20Index%20showing%20inflation.png

Graph%20of%20price%20of%20CDs%20and%20DVDs%20against%20Average%20Earnings%20Index%20showing%20inflation.png

Isn't this the best Christmas present ever?

Edited by MrTReturns

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I don't know if this one has been discussed? I have nothing to do with this site, BUT it looks pretty good. I was looking for the cost of the TV licence and the uptake number, but found this instead (thanks "punter").

http://www.inflationarypressure.com

You can even check the inflation of Butter, over the years. Have fun.

Graph%20of%20price%20of%20House%20Prices%20against%20Council%20Tax%20showing%20inflation.png

From the front page:

When will House Prices Increase?

Many UK homeowners are finding it difficult to sell their property. The last housing bubble burst in the early 1990’s and prices slowed almost no growth from 1992 to 1997. However after 1997 house prices increased rapidly to a peak in 2008.

Recent stresses have resulted in a recent reduction in prices. Homeowners with mortgages will be pleased to know that the current mortgage payment is at a similar level to 2000, making UK property very affordable.

I don't think I need say more. (And why the capital letters for 'House Prices Increase'? Psychologically important to the author?)

Edited by inflating

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From the front page:

When will House Prices Increase?

Many UK homeowners are finding it difficult to sell their property. The last housing bubble burst in the early 1990’s and prices slowed almost no growth from 1992 to 1997. However after 1997 house prices increased rapidly to a peak in 2008.

Recent stresses have resulted in a recent reduction in prices. Homeowners with mortgages will be pleased to know that the current mortgage payment is at a similar level to 2000, making UK property very affordable.

I don't think I need say more. (And why the capital letters for 'House Prices Increase'? Psychologically important to the author?)

What a ******nut, bases pricing of everything else on their price and then bases housing cost on interst payable only, with complete disregard for the actual cost.

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...making UK property very affordable.

...

I've been saying this for a while now, houses are affordable but they aren't good value.

IMHO it's now all about interest rates. Until they rise prices stay high. So far the Bank of England have had to buy about 36% of the countries government debt (debt of about £1 Trillion with QE of about £375 Billion) to keep rates down. So still about 2/3 of the debt left to buy to keep rates low.

The question is when will the first non Bank of England gilt holder realise we are in a Catch 22 and blink:

1. the QE has to continue to keep bond prices high and interest rates low. If the BofE stops buying now then the main buyer is taken out of the market. Supply and demand then dictates that prices fall and rates rise.

2. by continuing to QE at some point it will be realised that it will never be paid back and so will be akin to printing money for real, discrediting the currency, resulting in massive bond selling pushing prices down and interest rates up.

Gilt rates rise then all £ denominated debt interest rates rise in unison.

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Womens clothes dropped in price alot more than mens.

Women don't notice the drop in quality as much?

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I didn't visit the front page but there is a lot of spiel on there. Who is the author, what is their agenda, what are they trying to sell?

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I've been saying this for a while now, houses are affordable but they aren't good value.

IMHO it's now all about interest rates. Until they rise prices stay high. So far the Bank of England have had to buy about 36% of the countries government debt (debt of about £1 Trillion with QE of about £375 Billion) to keep rates down. So still about 2/3 of the debt left to buy to keep rates low.

The question is when will the first non Bank of England gilt holder realise we are in a Catch 22 and blink:

1. the QE has to continue to keep bond prices high and interest rates low. If the BofE stops buying now then the main buyer is taken out of the market. Supply and demand then dictates that prices fall and rates rise.

2. by continuing to QE at some point it will be realised that it will never be paid back and so will be akin to printing money for real, discrediting the currency, resulting in massive bond selling pushing prices down and interest rates up.

Gilt rates rise then all £ denominated debt interest rates rise in unison.

houses arent affordable.

Mortgages are.

Thats why houses are unaffordable.

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I've been saying this for a while now, houses are affordable but they aren't good value.

IMHO it's now all about interest rates. Until they rise prices stay high. So far the Bank of England have had to buy about 36% of the countries government debt (debt of about £1 Trillion with QE of about £375 Billion) to keep rates down. So still about 2/3 of the debt left to buy to keep rates low.

The question is when will the first non Bank of England gilt holder realise we are in a Catch 22 and blink:

1. the QE has to continue to keep bond prices high and interest rates low. If the BofE stops buying now then the main buyer is taken out of the market. Supply and demand then dictates that prices fall and rates rise.

2. by continuing to QE at some point it will be realised that it will never be paid back and so will be akin to printing money for real, discrediting the currency, resulting in massive bond selling pushing prices down and interest rates up.

Gilt rates rise then all £ denominated debt interest rates rise in unison.

Didn't we reach that point when the BoE gave the Treasury back the interest back it had paid on the gilts?

http://conservativehome.blogs.com/thecolumnists/2012/11/andrew-lilico-inflation-is-too-high-and-switching-from-qe-to-outright-money-printing-aint-gonna-help.html

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