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Why Can't The Media Say "buy A House"


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#61 ader

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Posted 29 March 2012 - 10:28 PM

You buy a flat-you own the volume within but have to pay for the upkeep of the container. :lol:


and if you buy a flat you own no land - the land is the expensive bit and you don't get any!

#62 sims

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Posted 29 March 2012 - 10:47 PM

and if you buy a flat you own no land - the land is the expensive bit and you don't get any!

Unless your flat includes the garden, eh. You'll also find that the freehold for houses converted to leasehold flats is typically fairly cheap, so if you have an irrational fascination with freeholds, feel free to buy a few and see what good it does you.

The only practical difference is having to ask for permission for major alterations to the building.. but with the statutory right to acquire the freehold nowadays, the more difficult thing is usually getting planning permission as long as what you're doing is reasonable.

Of course it's nicer to have a detached house with garden rather than a flat, but if it's in a decent city location, buying a flat can be a perfectly reasonable thing to do.

#63 (Blizzard)

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Posted 29 March 2012 - 11:02 PM

and if you buy a flat you own no land - the land is the expensive bit and you don't get any!


You are getting certain limited rights over some land, but this is all land 'ownership' ever really amounts to anyway.

Land is a kind of 'intellectual property', which isn't really property either.

Edited by (Blizzard), 29 March 2012 - 11:03 PM.

"As soon as the land of any country has all become private property, the landlords, like all other men, love to reap where they never sowed, and demand a rent even for its natural produce. The wood of the forest, the grass of the field, and all the natural fruits of the earth, which, when land was in common, cost the labourer only the trouble of gathering them, come, even to him, to have an additional price fixed upon them. He must then pay for the licence to gather them; and must give up to the landlord a portion of what his labour either collects or produces. This portion, or, what comes to the same thing, the price of this portion, constitutes the rent of land ...." Adam Smith: The Wealth of Nations[17]




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