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Do You Have A Favourite Coin?


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#1 TwoBobRob

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Posted 08 March 2012 - 11:45 AM

.....If so, why?

I'm guessing there are popular designs amongst collectors and I'd assume this is true for investors too, but what's the general consensus - stick to your faves, price on the day, or whatever takes your fancy?

Any to be avoided?

#2 Take Me Back To London!

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Posted 08 March 2012 - 02:18 PM

British gold soveigens due to their excemption from capital gains tax (CGT), they have a long history, were once in circulation and are the most well known bullion coin throughout the world, also they are a smaller size, easier to transport and carry without attracting attention, unlike the bigger 1 troy ounce coins like the Krugerrand, Eagle or Maples. My personal favourite is the King George V gold soveregins, especially the "big head versions", they are in better condition than the earlier Edward VII and Victoria sovereigens. Also picking up some of the recent low/special mintage 2002 and 2005 year sovereigns are worth considering as they can be bought for about a £5 more than a regular sov.

My other "historical" favorites are the 20 Swiss Franc Vrenelli, Italian 20 Lira (King Emanuelle II and Umberto) and French 20 Franc Napolean III coins, which can be bought near the spot price, but have a possible extra appreciation due to their history and age.

I would suggest not buying the proof coins, which trade well above spot price and their condition, handling and storage is all important and is best left to the coin afficinardos.
Bankers may well have acted as if they’ve been sitting in the casino during the boom years. But it was a state-owned casino, with governments as the croupiers, and central bankers behind the bar giving out free booze.

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#3 Spot

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Posted 08 March 2012 - 04:01 PM

I like 1/4 Oz Britannias because they also are exempt from CGT, but unlike Sovs, 4 of 'em make a nice round ounce of gold.

#4 Asheron

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Posted 08 March 2012 - 07:37 PM

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Edited by Asheron, 08 March 2012 - 07:40 PM.

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#5 Sir Sidney Ruff-Diamond

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Posted 08 March 2012 - 08:50 PM

I rather like the two pound coin. Very difficult to counterfeit (unlike the pound coin), nice designs, weighty feel.

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#6 TwoBobRob

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Posted 08 March 2012 - 09:11 PM

I rather like the two pound coin. Very difficult to counterfeit (unlike the pound coin), nice designs, weighty feel.



Congratulations by the way, on an excellent username :)

#7 Sir Sidney Ruff-Diamond

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Posted 08 March 2012 - 10:07 PM

Congratulations by the way, on an excellent username :)


If you read up on him, this moniker was much closer to his true persona than many realise.



"Anyone thinking of buying in any of the housing markets that this survey has identified as bubbling should wait until prices have fallen"

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#8 Quiet Guy

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Posted 08 March 2012 - 10:12 PM

Victoria 'Young Head' sovereigns - Shield and St. George pattern.

I just think they took a bit more time and effort with the production of the old sovereigns compared to the modern versions - especially recently minted coins. Photos of a Shield I used to own attached.

But a word of warning - don't expect to get the premium back from a dealer or for nice looking or slightly rarer coins such as Shields if you sell.

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#9 SuperChimp

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Posted 09 March 2012 - 08:24 AM

Victoria 'Young Head' sovereigns - Shield and St. George pattern.


I agree. Of the three portraits of Victoria in my opinion the Young Head was the nicest.

As I prefer to buy in whole ounces and cannot afford gold I buy American Siver Eagles.

Silver_American_Eagle.jpg

I think the quality is fantastic.

The Mexican Libertad is also great.

frontback-mexican_silver_libertad.jpg

Edited by Marcus Aurelius, 09 March 2012 - 08:25 AM.


#10 newbonic

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Posted 09 March 2012 - 01:44 PM

Has to be 1 oz silver maples for me...

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#11 Take Me Back To London!

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Posted 09 March 2012 - 08:59 PM

Victoria 'Young Head' sovereigns - Shield and St. George pattern.

I just think they took a bit more time and effort with the production of the old sovereigns compared to the modern versions - especially recently minted coins.


I agree with you there regarding the sovs. Also the everyday circulated coinage which the Royal Mint churn out are rubbish
Bankers may well have acted as if they’ve been sitting in the casino during the boom years. But it was a state-owned casino, with governments as the croupiers, and central bankers behind the bar giving out free booze.

John Stepek

#12 SuperChimp

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Posted 10 March 2012 - 05:18 PM

Also the everyday circulated coinage which the Royal Mint churn out are rubbish


Its a real shame. If you look at the pre-decimilization coinage their designs were fantastic. Even the smaller coinage such as the penny had iconic designs.

Although I do like the new idea of each coin having a part of the shield and when they are put together they form a full shield. The 'Olympic' theme with the 50p coins is an interesting idea as well.

#13 Stay Beautiful

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Posted 10 March 2012 - 05:28 PM

a 1914 Half Soveriegn (GB),

a 1964 Half Dollar (USA).

#14 Renewed Investor

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Posted 26 March 2012 - 02:37 PM

My favourite is the Perth Mint Kookaburras. And out of them the 2008 is the best design IMHO.

#15 Ruffneck

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Posted 29 March 2012 - 12:05 PM

Gothic florin is pretty nice.

Edited by Ruffneck, 29 March 2012 - 12:06 PM.

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