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Ftse On 9 Day Losing Streak

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http://www.telegraph.co.uk/finance/debt-crisis-live/8911660/Debt-crisis-live.html

That fall on the FTSE 100 marks nine consectutive negative trading sessions. The total for this losing streak has been a fall of 7.78pc, equivalent to about £107 Billion in market capitalization.

Losing streak chart here

Still once the next happy clappy announcement comes this cat will bounce again.

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Surely it's time for a European leaders photoshoot, sorry I mean summit?

Hopefully Angela Merkel will remember not to do the Nazi salute again

:blink:

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Maybe someone should call black Friday to turn things around?

How about a Black December call to get everything nice and bubbly in time for 2012?

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How about a Black December call to get everything nice and bubbly in time for 2012?

Listening to 'The Archers' today in the car, (Dan or whoever it was) reminded (Doris or whoever it was) that it was only a month to Christmas. Well, turns out neither of them had bought presents yet. Oh noes!

Had to wonder whether that little exchange had been specially written in to boost our retail folk.

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i am boethius. author of the consolation of philosophy.

it is my belief that fortune is a wheel

inconstancy is my very essence says the wheel

rise up on my spokes if you like,

but dont complain when your cast back down into the depths.

good times pass away, but then so do the bad.

mutability is our tragedy, but its also our hope.

the worst of the times, like the best.

are always passing away.

Edited by right_freds_dead

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The next week will be interesting to see the sales figurs from the US for their Black Friday start of the Christmas selling season - called 'black' because sales are traditionally so good that retailers go into the black for the first time in the year.

I suspect that we will get lots of positive spin that will lift the DOW next week, only for later the spin to be turned into bull.

Of couse, if by next week the US is reporting that sales this weekend in the US are poor or down then all bets are off for a US recession and the DOW going down.

The FTSE will do whatever the DOW does.

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The next week will be interesting to see the sales figurs from the US for their Black Friday start of the Christmas selling season - called 'black' because sales are traditionally so good that retailers go into the black for the first time in the year.

I suspect that we will get lots of positive spin that will lift the DOW next week, only for later the spin to be turned into bull. bear.

Of couse, if by next week the US is reporting that sales this weekend in the US are poor or down then all bets are off for a US recession and the DOW going down.

The FTSE will do whatever the DOW does.

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The next week will be interesting to see the sales figurs from the US for their Black Friday start of the Christmas selling season - called 'black' because sales are traditionally so good that retailers go into the black for the first time in the year.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Black_Friday_%28shopping%29

Black Friday is the day following Thanksgiving Day in the United States, traditionally the beginning of the Christmas shopping season. On this day, most major retailers open extremely early, often at 4 a.m., or earlier, and offer promotional sales to kick off the shopping season.

..

The day's name originated in Philadelphia, where it originally was used to describe the heavy and disruptive pedestrian and vehicle traffic which would occur on the day after Thanksgiving.[4] Use of the term started before 1966 and began to see broader use outside Philadelphia around 1975. Later an alternative explanation began to be offered: that "Black Friday" indicates the point at which retailers begin to turn a profit, or are "in the black".[5]

I was busy saying the very same thing the other day to colleagues, then I read this which suggests the origin might be slightly different.

Although the notion is slightly bizarre especially when you consider the day itself is usually when retailers offer big discounts to get people in.

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Neck. Out. Sticking.

Santa Claus rally starts today. You'll be surprised how large.

Edited as I spelled Sanat wrong. Er...

Edited by Killer Bunny

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Neck. Out. Sticking.

Santa Claus rally starts today. You'll be surprised how large.

Edited as I spelled Sanat wrong. Er...

OK what happened????

SummaryChart2_15.UKX.png

Why the straight line like there was no trading for over two hours, then a sudden jump up?

EDIT: from the LSE- http://www.londonstockexchange.com/home/homepage.htm

Edited by Redcellar

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Neck. Out. Sticking.

Santa Claus rally starts today. You'll be surprised how large.

Edited as I spelled Sanat wrong. Er...

Brave call. The market should have fallen more by now with all the euro doom and gloom, my guess is if you're right it is because we've run out of sellers.

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Not really sticking your neck out as its 1% up. Somting about private sectore involvement in the EFSF

I suggest you reread my post.

I believe I talked about Santa Claus and large... Perhaps I imagined it.

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I suggest you reread my post.

I believe I talked about Santa Claus and large... Perhaps I imagined it.

This...?

BRUSSELS (Reuters) - Euro zone member states, mindful of flagging market confidence in euro zone debt, are considering dropping private sector involvement in the region's permanent bailout fund due to come into force in 2013, four EU officials said on Friday.

The discussions are taking place as part of wider negotiations over changing the EU treaty to introduce stricter fiscal rules, which Germany insists on as a precondition for deeper integration among euro zone states.

Commercial banks and insurance companies are expected to take a hit on their holdings of Greek sovereign bonds as part of the second bailout package being finalised for Athens.

But clauses relating to private sector involvement contained in the statutes of the European Stability Mechanism (ESM) - the permanent facility scheduled to start operating from mid-2013 - could be withdrawn, with the majority of euro zone states opposed to them.

http://uk.finance.yahoo.com/news/Exclusive-Euro-zone-drop-reuters_molt-3392055574.html?x=0

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The next week will be interesting to see the sales figurs from the US for their Black Friday start of the Christmas selling season -

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/finance/debt-crisis-live/8914584/Debt-crisis-live.html

It is forecast Americans will spend $20bn today and spend $500bn during the holiday season - up 3pc last year. Those at the front of queues in the City had waited since Wednesday afternoon.

"It's a good move to try to get shoppers to spend sooner, before they run out of money," said Burt Flickinger, III, president of retail consultancy Strategic Resource Group.

....

"Finances have been tough," said Millie Ayala, who queued at Toys R Us in New York since 5.30pm last night. "Things are a lot more expensive, but with Black Friday deals things are more affordable."

Or stores ramped prices before Black Friday to give suckers a great deal.

Got to love Burts comments.

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